Another body snatching case

December 13th, 2007 at 10:17 am by David Farrar

It’s sad that there has been another body snatching case.  Losing a family member is tough enough without having to put up with battles over the corpse.  The wishes of the deceased (who nominates a next of kin or executor) should be respected, even if you disagree.

The problem with the Police having failed to take action in the earlier case, despite explicit court orders, is that there is no incentive to obey the law now.  Yes it is nice if people obey the law just because it is the law, but for some that is not enough so you need a fear of punishment to act as an incentive.

If people saw some hefty fines, or worse, for people breaking court orders in relation to these matters, then they might not act quite so selfishly.

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25 Responses to “Another body snatching case”

  1. Johnboy (16,597 comments) says:

    If politicians can break the law and not be prosecuted by the police I guess it indicates to others that they can too, especially if the PC holy cow of cultural sensitivity can be invoked.

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  2. Linda Reid (415 comments) says:

    It’s more and more like the wild west. Might is right and I’ll do as I please.

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  3. barry (1,317 comments) says:

    prehistoric savages……………

    [DPF: Sigh - generalisations don't help]

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  4. toms (299 comments) says:

    Get in a car. Drive up to the coast. Dig her up again. Get her cremated the same night.

    If the police refuse to intervene, then stop whinging and do what has to be done yourself.

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  5. barry (1,317 comments) says:

    DPF – people who run around body snatching cant be regarded as sort of normal. Unfortunately (or maybe its fortunate ) the law in NZ is that there is no ownership vested in a human body. Interesting actually as one certainly does ownership in a cow or sheep body – but not human. (if they did have ownership, then there would be value, then body snatching would be a finacial activity………..)

    I dont care what anyone thinks, stealing bodies requires a somewhat very strange thinking process. Combine this activity with the death by drowning in Lower Hutt (or was is Wainui) and one cant help but wonder if the thinking behind these activities is compatable with life in the 21st century.

    As the DNA man (Watson) said recently of Africa “we would like to think that all peoples were of equeal intelligence, but activites in africa would indicate that this isnt true” (or words to that effect.)

    The same could be said in this case. Maybe prehistoric savages is a bit harsh, but its not far off the mark.

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  6. Mike S (229 comments) says:

    This is a terrible situation for the family, especially as the biological father who has taken the body is described in at least one report as being “estranged” from his daughter.
    I don’t for a moment believe this is about Maori culture, it is about a disgruntled Dad trying to get his way at the end. He couldnt be bothered putting their relationship right while she was alive, so why should he be able to do this now?

    It really seems to me to be a case of abuse.
    I normally hesitate to see more laws placed on our books but I’d like to see one where this was lifted from a civil to a criminal matter and hefty penalties applied.

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  7. Monty (978 comments) says:

    East Coast Maori are becoming a law unto themselves (actually they have been for many years). The Police are simply too wimpy to challenge them. The drive between welington and Gisborne is 8 hours. They should have been stopped in their tracks and arrested –

    This sort of behaviour wil become more common place until they are arrested and the Law obeyed.

    This is about egos and arrogance. They are simply not respecting the deceased when this sort of fiasco occurs. Why are Maori leaders not saying whay an disgrace this is?

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  8. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    This case is so different from the ChCh case where the husband was taken back to the East Coast against the wishes of his partner. That case was insensitive and some would say crude.

    This situation is beyond bizarre. It was formulated in a manipulative, cunning, cowardly and heinous context. The father was a dog and loser who had never invested in the girl at any time. He was probably a large reason she was on drugs. He may well have introduced her to them at his financial gain.

    She had a trusted mother and was in a very long term stable relationship.
    The biological father had no business entering dicussions about her body.
    The family should’ve pushed him away straight away. The cronies who helped him are gutter residents and have np pride in their culture or homeland.

    The elders should step in on behalf of the family and give them first priority for their wishes for their daughter and partner. How can they be trusted otherwise. Obviously there should be laws set up pertaining to last wishes and who should take responsibility after death. Maori should be very clued up on these things so these perversions of justice cannot happen.

    The father is a pervert, the tribal elders are cowards.

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  9. Craig Ranapia (1,915 comments) says:

    Get in a car. Drive up to the coast. Dig her up again. Get her cremated the same night.

    If the police refuse to intervene, then stop whinging and do what has to be done yourself.

    Fucking hell, Tom, even by your non-existent standards that’s more than usually stupid. Get a posse together and go desecrate a cemetery (which, incidentally would be private property) because the Gisborne police are too spineless to enforce a court order? Yup, that’s not going to make a horrendously bad situation even worse.

    Meanwhile, perhaps its time for the Police Minister and the Commissioner to front up and explain whether there’s now a de facto cultural defence for body snatching and flouting court orders. If there is, I’d like to see it codified in law. At least then, everybody is more certain where they stand.

    I’d also like to hear from the Funeral Directors Association of New Zealand whether its members (including the Harbour City funeral home) will let me wander off with the corpse of any relation whose funeral arrangements I don’t happen to approve of.

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  10. ghostwhowalks (377 comments) says:

    I see you are repeating the myth that the previous court order required the police to ‘take action’

    Like all civil court orders the police are not obliged to act unless they are a party to the proceedings. Which they wee clearly not.
    Since a disturbing a body in a grave is an offence , the police were advised of the results of the proceedings so they knew it was lawful .
    That is the end of the police responsibilities.
    This is no different than say a motor accident where someone wins damages , the police dont enforce that court order either.

    Just the sort of half baked legal opinion we have come to expect from DPF , especially over the EFB, about to become EFA( and its new offspring)

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  11. thehawkreturns (162 comments) says:

    There are rumours that Auckland Central Police Station are offering several unidentified bodies for immediate delivery to good burial sites.
    The morgue superintendent has been issued with a new laser speed camera and needs the practice.

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  12. gd (2,286 comments) says:

    DPF Both cases involve those of Maori descent (Sigh) Denial of the facts and excuse for the Police not to act. Racist behaviour. If the parties had been whiteys the Plod would have been all over them and bugger the cultural sensitvities cause whiteys not allowed that luxury.

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  13. Craig Ranapia (1,915 comments) says:

    [DPF: And that’s 35 demerits]

    Thank you, DPF, but my seasonal goodwill is exhausted. Any more defamatory bullshit from that quarter, and you’ll both be getting a nastygram from Runn, Grabbit and Sue for Christmas.

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  14. Grant (444 comments) says:

    WTF inspired that little outburst? GhostWhoAppearsToNotBeAsInclusiveAsLeftiesContinuallyInsistTheyAre?

    That’s a very thin veneer you have over that homophobia of yours. Surely the folks at the VDS and that other site will be upset to see you commenting like that.
    G

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  15. Rex Widerstrom (5,354 comments) says:

    Mike S, as the father of two part-Maori kids, thanks for noting that:

    I don’t for a moment believe this is about Maori culture, it is about a disgruntled Dad trying to get his way at the end.

    Some of the other commentary here was begininning to make me feel a little odd… I couldn’t decide whether to let my flesh creep or my blood boil.

    Arguments about cremation vs burial, this cemetary vs that cemetary, and who gets aunty’s Chesterfield (and sometimes body) are hardly confined to one racial group. The death of a family member – especially when some members of that family are estranged from other members – is a time when emotions are fraught and old enmities revived.

    You think bodynapping is the worst someone can do at a time like this? A growing trend at funerals is to show a video retrospective of the deceased’s life, which means the video production company I run gets asked to compile the tribute and then play it at the service.

    Till we did the first one, I thought the worst back-biting, claws out, mud wrestling infighting I’d seen was during the lead-up to weddings. Now I let my business partner handle all the hitchings and dispatchings. It’s much safer dealing with evil capitalists who want to sell you soap :-)

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  16. john (478 comments) says:

    (Non PC) if the agrieved family said on tv they were going up north to smash the maoris face in for stealing the body , i bet mr plod would put their donuts down and arrest the grieving family ,(the easy option) They cannot upset the body snatchers,ie the first ?? nation. who do get away with murder ,for a Very long time ,before trials.

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  17. Chicken Little (741 comments) says:

    Bet my house Ghost = Nih from KBB and VDS. Not that many people round with fucked up attitudes like that these days.

    Interestingly, fairly sure Nih also = Robert Owen. To be confirmed.

    Ahh… tangled web these leftie fucktards weave ain’t it?

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  18. Tina (687 comments) says:

    “I don’t for a moment believe this is about Maori culture, ”

    Well, good…..

    Since when in the West did the “cultural” mob legally trump the wishes of the next of kin/executor?

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  19. Adam Smith (890 comments) says:

    Why is it that in the James Takamori case, the family cannot get a High Court order enforced?

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  20. Adam Smith (890 comments) says:

    From the Herald today in an artcile on the Marshall case

    “James Takamore was buried at Kutarere, southwest of Opotiki, after his body was taken from Christchurch by his Bay of Plenty whanau against the wishes of partner Denise Clarke.

    Eastern Bay of Plenty police said they would refuse to exhume him if asked to enforce an exhumation permit obtained by his partner because they did not want to be “the meat in the sandwich”.

    This statement echoesa similar one from police in Gisborne re the more recent case. In addition in the artcile the Gisborne mayor, does not want to receive a request for action either. Why will the authorities not enforce the law and/or orders of the High Court?

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  21. Adam Smith (890 comments) says:

    So now the police decide which court orders to enforce.

    What a mickey mouse situation, I thought the police were there to enforce the law. Silly me.

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  22. Tina (687 comments) says:

    So how about next of kin arranging private exhumation with police “prescence”, pre equipped with the Court directive, attempted interference by the bros must then be actionable as assault etc?

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  23. Tina (687 comments) says:

    Errr..”presence”

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  24. gd (2,286 comments) says:

    I will say it again If it had been my family Plod would have been around and arrested the guilty parties and enforced the Court order no worries.

    And if I started to bleat about ‘cultural sensitivities” Plod would have laughed at me.

    But then I dont have ‘special Laws” to protect me.

    Its called racism.

    Treating people differently in the same circumstances because of the colour of their skin ( or because they claim to be of a certain ethnic group)

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