Ten reasons to vote to change the Government tomorrow and to vote National

November 7th, 2008 at 3:34 pm by David Farrar
  1. The New Zealand economy is facing the most challenging international circumstances since the 1930s. To get through it with a minimum of damage to people’s jobs and incomes will require a Government that has an unrelenting focus on economic growth – just as Kevin Rudd does.
  2. Winston. If Governments get away with tolerating Ministers who blatantly lie, then the message it will send is that you get rewarded for lying to the public, The behaviour of Peters has been a disgrace, and only exceeded by the Prime Minister’s tolerance and defence of it. It will be healthy for Labour to get punished at the polls, so that next time they are in this situation their response will be not to tolerate corruption instead of making excuses for it. Rewarding Labour with a fourth term for covering up for Winston would be an awful message to send.
  3. Healthcare. The ideological jihad against the private sector must stop. It is literally killing people. A coordinated approach to using all the resources out there will lead to better outcomes for those who need top quality healthcare.
  4. Tax. If Labour is returned it is almost inevitable they will massively increase taxes in their secret December mini-budget. They have shown an inability to keep a lid on spending over the last nine years. The best you can get under Labour is that they will not cancel the tax cuts already legislated. Under you will have a Government that knows it is spending your money and will work hard to reduce taxes so families have more in their pockets.
  5. The Electoral Finance Act. Need more be said. National will repeal it immediately (while leaving in place transparency around donations). Labour will make it worse, exempt their own MPs from much of it, and introduce full taxpayer funding of political parties.
  6. Law & Order. We saw this week that Brad Shipton gets out in under three years for a pack rape with a sentence of almost nine year. Sickening. But this is no accident. Labour deliberately changed the law in 2001 to allow rapists and violent criminals to get parole after one third instead of two thirds of their sentence. I have no idea why, but they did. We don’t necessarily have a lot of criminals in NZ – we just keep letting them out to keep committing crimes. National will I am sure will be tougher on criminals. Labour have said they see no need for further changes and that the status quo is acceptable.
  7. Public Service Independence. Where does one start? The Police Commissioner hounded out of office on Helen Clark’s lies (this is beyond dispute). Madeleine Setchell and Erin Leigh. The attacks on the Auditor-General for doing his job over the illegal Parliamentary spending. The disgraceful behaviour towards the Director of the Serious Fraud Office because he exposed the truth about Winston’s donations. A neutral and independent public service is preferable to the US model where politicians appoint their supporters to everything. Throwing out Labour will help restore an independent public service.
  8. Education. By the time kids are at secondary school, it is too late if they can not read or write. Their future prospects are blighted and wasted. National’s focus on early detection and intervention for children who can not read, write or count could be the most important thing they do. National will spend more money on eight year olds that can’t vote than 18 year olds that can.
  9. Moderation or Radicalism? A John Key led Government will change direction and policies from Labour, but not radically so. The focus will be on improving economic growth, jobs and incomes. National looks to make up around 95% of a National-led Government. The alternative will be an unstable radical Government where Labour makes up less than 75% of it, and economic growth will be well down the list of priorities of its coalition partners. National, ACT and United Future may disagree somewhat on the policies for economic growth but they all see them as vital. The Green Party sees economic growth as a necessary evil, and to be tolerated only under duress. Chris Trotter said that a Labour/Green/Maori Party Government would be the most leftwing Government in 70 years, and he was right.
  10. John Key. He will be a great Prime Minister. Give him the chance to prove it.

I decided to stop at 10. I should probably also mention the 75% of homes to have fibre within six years as another reason. This is achievable and it will make a huge difference to New Zealand in terms of competitive advantage, plus changing where and how we work.

No matter who you vote for, make sure you vote tomorrow.

from somewhere near Cambridge!

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107 Responses to “Ten reasons to vote to change the Government tomorrow and to vote National”

  1. big bruv (13,928 comments) says:

    “DPF from somewhere near Cambridge!”

    Who the fuck is driving?…..it might pay to slow down just a little bit lads.

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  2. dime (9,980 comments) says:

    DPF off to visit bruv? that will be interesting.

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  3. jafapete (757 comments) says:

    Latest Roy Morgan poll is out: http://www.roymorgan.com/news/polls/2008/4334/

    It seems to show that not everybody is convinced about the need to vote National. I like it because if the result is half way between Roy Morgan and Comar Brunton, then my own prediction will be very close.

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  4. stayathomemum (140 comments) says:

    my neighbours might find this in their mailbox tomorrow morning!

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  5. emmess (1,428 comments) says:

    One point of disagreement

    >>The Green Party sees economic growth as a necessary evil

    And an un in front of necessary, not that they would get any though

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  6. Razork (375 comments) says:

    Nice work DPF.
    Ever considered working for the National party :-)

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  7. gingercrush (153 comments) says:

    Will be voting National. I would actually like to see Act get no more than 4 seats personally.

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  8. Michaels (1,318 comments) says:

    I want to congratulate John Key and his team.
    So many have commented that it’s been a boring campaign but I think John has done exactly what was needed.
    He ran a honest, clean and truthful campaign which sadly can’t be said about all.
    I believe they can finish off tonight, sit back, enjoy a wine together and say, we’ve done our best and now it’s upto the public.
    But before they all head their own way home, someone better call the caterers and make sure the champagne is in the chiller for tomorrow night!!!
    Well done guys, you have my two ticks!!!

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  9. dime (9,980 comments) says:

    razork – ever considered getting back to pandasport?

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  10. Fisiani (1,039 comments) says:

    stayathomemum make sure you get it in their mailboxes by 11.59 tonight

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  11. Razork (375 comments) says:

    DIME; why would i go there and be abused when I can be abused right here?
    It’s essentially the poor mans’s standard these days anyway.

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  12. berend (1,711 comments) says:

    How many reasons not to vote National? Supported NCEA, supported anti-smacking, supported ETS, basically they’ve supported every major disastrous policy introduced by Labour. Changing the government isn’t the same as changing direction people. They will take just as money from you as Labour does, and deliver just as little.

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  13. Tylerdurden (12 comments) says:

    Another good reason not to vote for the commy:

    http://foghorn.co.nz/aunty-robert/

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  14. Buggerlugs (1,592 comments) says:

    jafapete – why don’t you and david poneke get together and compare cardy patterns? Plonker.

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  15. Razork (375 comments) says:

    Foghorn = spam.

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  16. jastowns (126 comments) says:

    there will be no change,change is a action,at the top of the himalaya there government is talking about change,change is a word for those that have refused to pull there heads from there asses and look at what is really going on

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  17. Nefarious (533 comments) says:

    jastown, I’d strongly recommend changing the meds.

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  18. democracymum (648 comments) says:

    Have readied myself for the celebrations (or the unspeakable) on Saturday.

    The fridge is full of bubbly, and I have on hand
    Whaleoil’s, fabulous Hitler video, and the slow motion
    replay of Helen’s fall from grace.

    All will be consumed in great quantities regardless of the outcome.

    Church on Sunday to thank God from deliverance from evil,
    or to pray for the future of our country. Prefer the former
    to the latter.

    PS looking forward to seeing Labour and the Green’s
    banner ads being removed from my favourite websites at 12:00am

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  19. Burrt Badger (21 comments) says:

    Jastowns. I’d strongly recommend that you start taking the meds again, because all of your posts show some very interesting thought patterns?????????
    Crawl back into the orrifice you crawled out of, and stay there!!!!!!!

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  20. Wycroft (873 comments) says:

    Hear hear David, and if there’s one person for whom I want to see a National government, more than me that is, it’s you.

    Thank you, thank you, thank you for what you’ve done for a more vibrant and transparent democratic process.

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  21. RRM (9,933 comments) says:

    These are all good reasons – hence when the Nats win tomorrow (and they will) you won’t see me on here decrying Key’s election as the worst thing that’s happened to the country since Pearl Harbour or 9/11.

    (Time and place for everything, eh Phil? ;-) )

    Key has far exceeded my “Small weak whipping boy for Clark to dispatch” expectations and he *seems* to be a hell of a good guy. I can only hope Roger Douglas doesn’t get his hooks into him…

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  22. MY (6 comments) says:

    David, on behalf of all of us who can’t imagine their life without Kiwiblog – thank you for all your efforts over the years, for your wit, erudition, charm, and kindness. You are an exceptionally gifted human being – but then, you don’t need me to tell you that. I am sure you and WO will be happy with the result tomorrow – the result which would be much harder to achieve without your passionate contribution.

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  23. bwakile (757 comments) says:

    yes thanks David for all your work. You, more than anyone, has put democracy back in the hands of the people.

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  24. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    Does anyone know of anywhere I can watch the election results online?

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  25. iago (18 comments) says:

    Re: Public Service Independence

    What about National deciding to interfere with Pharmac and fund Herceptin? Surely it is best left to the experts to make decisions on drug funding. They can’t exactly back out now either, breaking an election promise to cancer sufferers is political suicide.

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  26. jastowns (126 comments) says:

    its a laugh all those that think i need meds have done no research outside of the tv or the paper,how ignorant you seem to me and others that have done research outside your box,turn of your tv you have all got the tools right in front of you,instead of wasting time writing insults,why not have a look infowar.com listen to the live stream,learn something that has 100%truth

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  27. mistywindow (27 comments) says:

    I’m not convinced that National are on the right track. They’re too far down the “Me too” path for my liking.
    They should be telling the nation that it’s time to get tough. Blood, sweat and tears to get our terminally ill productivity up. Swinging voters aren’t stupid. They’d understand and back a bit of honest bad news.

    National seem too ready to follow Labour; dishing out a goody bag to encourage more spending. They need to pay attention to Dr Paul Callaghan’s message which is supported by Michael Chick of Tait Electronics, Mike Daniell of Fisher & Paykel Healthcare, Richard Taylor, David Skilling, Stephen Tindall, and others.

    Do National have a hidden agenda. I have heard that the above powerful people have convinced National of the unpalatable truth of Dr Paul’s recipe for turning us around. Is there a secret agenda?

    I hope so, but it would have been better for their credibility and durability if they’d been up front.

    I’m tempted to vote for that plonker Rodney to drag the wee tinkers to the right.

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  28. ropata (117 comments) says:

    Hear, hear, David
    It’s been stimulating, challenging and frustrating following your blog over the last X years in Helengrad.
    Your top 10 are all great points but as a Christian I commend this article from Allan Chesswas, it’s helped to confirm my decision to vote Blue tomorrow.

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  29. Nefarious (533 comments) says:

    Nefarious top ten reasons to change the government tomorrow. In no particular order, except 1 and 2.

    1. Helen Clark
    2. Micheal Cullen
    3. Judith Tizard
    4. Annette King
    5. Parekura the Hutt
    6. Ruth Dyson
    7. Trevor Mallard
    8. The Greens – All of them.
    9. Winnocent
    10. The rest of the Labour fucktards.

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  30. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    its a laugh all those that think i need meds have done no research outside of the tv or the paper,how ignorant you seem to me and others that have done research outside your box,turn of your tv you have all got the tools right in front of you,instead of wasting time writing insults,why not have a look infowar.com listen to the live stream,learn something that has 100%truth

    Do you recommend tea leaves or chicken bones?

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  31. democracymum (648 comments) says:

    Give that lady a medal on the news tonight who said
    She hoped it was not too late for change
    Because she wanted to see the back of Helen Clark

    Not what Helen or the reporter were expecting

    Well done!

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  32. Bevan (3,924 comments) says:

    ….Stephen Tindall….

    You mean the Labour Party sycophant who owns the Warehouse?

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  33. Buggerlugs (1,592 comments) says:

    That cunt (don’t care about the demerits) Brent Edwards has just done a 10 minute hatchet job on National on National Radio. I hope that little balding fucker chokes on his fucking museli on Sunday when he gets his redundancy notice. Thank fuck most voters don’t listen to Radio Pravda…

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  34. peanut (139 comments) says:

    I would like to alert you to an extremely disturbing trend, which has developed in the procurement procedures, being used by local body and government departments.

    I have been associated with the civil engineering construction industry for over thirty years. I have been actively involved with preparing tenders, project management and administration of a multitude of local body and central government contracts. I am very familiar with Volume 1 of the Competitive Pricing Procedures Manual, which was developed and implemented by Transfund in the 90s (and still meant to be used under current law), to ensure best value for money for the procurement of physical works and professional services contracts let by local and central government.

    I am aware that Land Transport NZ will soon release new procurement procedures, based on their consultative document, issued in 2006, and subsequent submissions. I am also conscious of the fact that LTNZ has changed Transfund’s main procurement objectives, from price and promoting private sector markets to responsiveness and sustainability. These objectives were presumably conceived from concerns over the reduction of available contractors and resources during the housing boom in NZ in the last five years. This situation has now dramatically changed, and presently, and in the foreseeable future, there is now an over supply of willing and capable contractors.

    I know that a consortium of large roading companies (Roading NZ) and Association of Consulting Engineers have been lobbying seriously for wholesale changes to the CPP Manual, in line with the governments new objectives. They argue that, for large contractors to justify investment in training and resources, and to provide sustainability, there needs to be a redefinition of “value for money” and a reversal of the culture in which contracts are priced and administered. They have submitted a variety of arguments for these changes, including the introduction of collaborative procurement; where contractors and consultants work together to theoretically provide their version of “value for money”. In my opinion, their submission is deceptive and full of self interest, with the prime motive to reduce competition and cover up professional deficiencies. Contrary to their arguments, their proposals if implemented, will only lead to increased costs, reduced productivity and a further decrease in professionalism.

    This is actually paving the way for the exclusion of very capable, smaller and privately owned contracting companies, in tough economic times. And, more importantly, it is seriously contradictory to the rate payer and tax payer interests. This is of huge concern and requires urgent attention.

    In my experience, competition based on price and adversarial procurement is the only way to increase productivity, innovation, raise the standards of design and supervision, and reduce costs. It enables designers and contractors to clearly identify mistakes and assign liabilities. People can only learn from their mistakes, and systems will subsequently improve as the result of this. However, it does require the professional engineers to the contract, to take a more active on-site role. In the last few years, they have taken a departure from this role to lessen their professional liability and costs, and to increase their own profitability. This has lead to a slow decline in professional engineers’ knowledge base, to the extent that they are losing their confidence to provide adequate design and supervision without the contractor’s “collaboration”.

    The use of collaborative contracts will progress to further covering up of mistakes and further degeneration of profession knowledge and practical learning. Our political system is designed to be adversarial, to minimise corruption and complacency and the same should apply to all aspects of construction contracts. Tenders that are evaluated with the price not being considered important, but based on the engineers’ subjective opinion of how relaxed they feel with the contractor, will not deliver “value for money”. In fact, they can add several hundred thousand, even millions of dollars, to the value of the contract. This results in less work being undertaken by the councils and government, due to the absurdly inflated price of the tendered contract.

    I believe collaborative contracts, and tenders evaluated with minimal regard for the tendered price, are favoured by engineers who have lost touch with their fundamental professional responsibilities. They are also preferred by contractors who wish to eliminate competition and increase profit margins for share holders (many of whom are foreign based).

    Although the new procurement procedures have not yet been officially issued, local bodies in our region, foreseeing the changes, are already moving away from the current Competitive Pricing Procedures, and are adopting their own modified standards, which protect larger NZ wide or multi-national contractors. Some of the alterations being adopted are anti-competitive, and detrimental to good local businesses, rate payers and tax payers.

    After the election, I would like to see the new government prevent the release of these new anti-competitive procurement procedures, and insist that the current or any upgraded manual for competitive pricing procedures ensures the promotion of private enterprise and halts the monopolization of New Zealand roading works by large overseas owned multi-national companies.

    If necessary, I can provide further information about recent contracts that have been awarded under anti-competitive pricing procedures and have excluded capable legitimate contractors, who have submitted substantially lower prices. In one case, a government contract was awarded for nearly two million dollars above the lowest price tendered by a competent contractor.

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  35. chfr (126 comments) says:

    I have been reading the vote08 section of stuff (I know I probably shouldn’t) and in the last 2 days I have noticed that the comments section seem to have changed in hue in the last day or so.

    Either the mood of the electorate has changed (and I don’t think it has) or NZ First and Labour are getting their supporters to flood talkback and the stuff blogs. Anyone have any ideas???

    I can’t bring myself to think the electorate is falling for winocent and hellun again.

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  36. Owen McShane (1,226 comments) says:

    The Maori party advertisement on TV One tonight was impressive, appealing to both the head and the heart – as we have come to expect.

    As one who is committed to the late Julian Simon’s view that the people are “The Ultimate Resource” I was naturally impressed by their affirmation, in line with the great Maori proverb, that the three most important resources are “the people, the people, the people!”

    But given that belief, how could the Maori Party join a coalition which includes the Green Party, a party that is equally convinced that “the people” are a are a destructive force, responsible for all the sorrows of the world?

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  37. KennyJelly (31 comments) says:

    @chfr

    I just downloaded and listening to Danny Watson’s on ZB. I died a little inside to found so many people still think that Winston was an innocent victim being targeted by a “far right” conspiracy, and decided to give Winstons First thier sympathy party vote. These people will have Kiwis blood on their hands if Helen Mugabe and Winston Liar managed to get back into the parliament. You think the current Green/Winstons First/Labour combination is bad? Wait till the 5 headed monster comes alive. Be prepare to see millions and millions of dollars gone to waste on passing stupid law.

    On a side note, if the 5 headed monster does come alive, the first thing I will do is write to Sue Bradford and ask her to add a “no putting your kids in cloth dryer” clause to the Anti-discipline bill. Obviously it is working, just look at how many kids are not being bashed to death since the passing of that bill. We just gotta clarify that putting your 3 year old in a dryer is also uncool, so that no kid will be a victim of vicious cloth dryer ever again.

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  38. slightlyrighty (2,475 comments) says:

    I wonder if the staff of Capital and Coast health are feeling well disposed towards Labour, given that there seems to be a risk of them not being paid as the board has no money with which to do so.

    What happened to the 12 billion spent on health? Will this be fixed by Labour or are they too busy looking for dirt? My wife is due to give birth at Wellington Hospital in 6-7 weeks and I would really like some certainty here.

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  39. Tylerdurden (12 comments) says:

    Razork – nah not spam. They have a competition with billboard photoshop jobs. Currently billboards taking the piss out of national are winning.

    Im suggesting we vote for one taking the piss out of labour. Like the one below:

    http://foghorn.co.nz/aunty-robert/

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  40. Lindsay Addie (1,529 comments) says:

    My predictions for the election are here:

    http://lindsayaddie.blogspot.com/2008/11/my-prediction.html

    Look at the pie chart. Feeling too lazy to retype the numbers again. :lol:

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  41. Gulag Archipelago (146 comments) says:

    To reiterate,
    Moses said to the children of Israel, “Pick up your shovels, mount your asses and camels, and I will lead you to the Promised Land.” Nearly 5,000 years later David Lange said, “Lay down your shovels, sit on your asses, light up a camel, this is the Promised Land.”

    Now, Helen Clark is going to steal your shovels, tax your asses, raise the price of your camels, and mortgage the Promised Land. If you are one of the fortunate people who have anything left after paying taxes, we expect a generous contribution to Kiwiblog

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  42. Fisiani (1,039 comments) says:

    Folks go to bed and sleep. It will be a long day of celebrating tomrrow. Some here are misguided and one eyed but bookmakers are seldom wrong. Centrebet at 9pm is paying 6.00 for a Labour PM and 1.12 for a national PM. Heavy betting apparently coming from 9th Floor to make a killing.

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  43. slightlyrighty (2,475 comments) says:

    I do not condone binge drinking

    http://www.throng.co.nz/pulp-sport/the-bill-ben-party-election-night-drinking-game

    But THIS looks like fun!!!!!!!!

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  44. Barnsley Bill (983 comments) says:

    Iago at 5.40 said;

    “Re: Public Service Independence

    What about National deciding to interfere with Pharmac and fund Herceptin? Surely it is best left to the experts to make decisions on drug funding. They can’t exactly back out now either, breaking an election promise to cancer sufferers is political suicide.”

    DPF, I aplogise in advance and will take my punishment without complaint.
    Iago, you are a stupid motherfucker.
    I can only assume that cancer has never touched you or your family. As angry as I am I do not wish it to be so.. others may be less charitable.

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  45. bharmer (687 comments) says:

    What I have never understood about Pharmac is why our little bunch of “experts” disagrees with the recommendations of the proven experts in every other developed country in the world. I am not inclined to leave anything to this little bunch of experts. National is right to get rid of the infamous 9 week funding.

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  46. Lindsay Addie (1,529 comments) says:

    BB.

    I agree with your comments about cancer and about Iago. I had a brother and my sister both with cancer last year. My sister died of cervical cancer, my brother survived. I think the government should do all it can to fund the latest drugs for cancer treatment.

    I’ve witnessed first hand the difficult decisions cancer specialists have to make because of the cost of cancer drugs.

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  47. noskire (842 comments) says:

    Slightly-off topic, but if anyone is still surfing the Herald, Stuff, Kiwiblog or TV3 websites after midnight, keep an eye out for Labour ads. Get a screenshot if you can.

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  48. Glutaemus Maximus (2,207 comments) says:

    So here we are on the penultimate night.

    I will give the lefties one last chance to snatch my hand off on a wager for $1k for National getting 55%+ of the party vote.

    Stayed at the Langham last night.

    In the Taxi on the way to the Viaduct, the taxi driver said that ALL his fares for the past week that talked politics wanted change!

    He than said that traditionally, Fijian Indians had always voted Labour!

    And this election he said there was a huge change in sentiment.

    How could a woman who had never had kids or a proper job know how to deal with a financial crisis!

    Think he could be very right! He also said that the Maori he knew were sick of Labour treating them like retards!

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  49. Glutaemus Maximus (2,207 comments) says:

    “I agree with your comments about cancer and about Iago. I had a brother and my sister both with cancer last year. My sister died of cervical cancer, my brother survived. I think the government should do all it can to fund the latest drugs for cancer treatment.

    I’ve witnessed first hand the difficult decisions cancer specialists have to make because of the cost of cancer drugs.”

    Far more important for the State to buy a huge Station for dear Leader to enjoy with her cronies! $40-50m.

    All to be a complete Dicktator!

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  50. bringbackthebiff (99 comments) says:

    bringbackthebiff hopes for you all that the Labour scum is swept from parliament

    Go Nats you got my ticks, not the same ticks Helen has

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  51. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    John Key. He will be a great Prime Minister. Give him the chance to prove it.

    A John Key led Government will change direction and policies from Labour, but not radically so. The focus will be on improving economic growth, jobs and incomes.

    Yeah Key’s better than Hulun but then so is a chimp. Unfortunately Key has shown me nothing that leads me to suspect he understands that radical change is the only thing that will lesson the storm still to hit. This time next year half of the readers on this blog will have been unemployed for six months. Key and the Nat’s policy statements contain nothing but platitudes. Don’t scare the horses? Fine, understand.

    But if anyone believes that the storm will be in the least mitigated by the Nat’s policies enunciated during the campaign, they’re barking. One of the first things I’d do for example is form a crisis management team: e.g. Key, Brash, Douglas, English, Moore, Little, Anderton, Caygill. It has to be cross-party, this is a national issue in magnitude second only to a hot war. I would also have a similar summit as in 1984, inviting the Roundtable, people like Whelen, Hickey, Morgan. Unlike the Knowledge Wave I’d make sure action, real action, followed. I’m not saying this won’t happen, but statements such as Key made ruling Douglas out of Cabinet suggest to me he’s more of a follower than a leader. I hope he’s like other politicians who say one thing and do another, and I hope he’s interested in radical change, because the situation warrants nothing less. What I fear is that he will behave as he has since he entered Parliament, as a compromiser. NZ needs that right now like we need a hole in the head, notwithstanding that a Liarbore govt would be even worse than that.

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  52. iaroha (3 comments) says:

    FOUR good reasons to party vote Green tomorrow instead of voting for a National Government :

    GROWTH WITH A FUTURE FOR OUR CHILDREN AND THE PLANET !

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  53. Ross Elliot (83 comments) says:

    Well, I dunno what to say, and this may sound pretty negative, but if those ratfucksonofabitch cocksuckers give Labour another shot at coalition, you can kiss my hairy ass.

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  54. JTK (1 comment) says:

    Is it a good time to sell your house? Buy a new car? Invest in shares? – Most would say “No”. Why? Due to the present global situation, the economic future is predictably worsening.
    So if you’re not going to make a decision to change your house, car, investment portfolio, why on earth would you want to change the leaders of the country? A change in Government to National, after nine years of opposition, would take a long while to “get on it’s feet” to start to make any changes at all. By then, the hole will be a lot deeper, and harder to get out of. Maintain the current Governments momentum to haul NZ through the tough times and think about change when the light at the end of the tunnel is switched back on again. Don’t vote National now, as they won’t recover within three years and will be out the door again in 2011.
    And by the way DPF, these ten reasons above sound more centre-left; Muldoon would be laughing at the thought that they were pro-National! If you are wearing a blue badge, then don’t stand under a red light, someone might think you’re batting for the other team.

    Have a nice day tomorrow,
    JTK – Sydney

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  55. jackp (668 comments) says:

    Reid, I think you have to give Key more credit than that. Helen is out for power. She would make the economic situation a time of opportunity such as dropping the tax cuts and increasing the take with the ETS, etc and making people more dependent on government. I don’t think Key would take advantage, at least not his first term. He is a quick study and I like that because he hasn’t been jaded like helen and winston peters are. He will focus on productivity of this country, something the greens, labour and progressives can’t grasp and productivity will increase the quality of living in New Zealand. Even Key admits there are going to be some job losses and there is no getting around that. I think he will pull through. He was smart not to run negative campaign and so far it seemed to work pretty well. We’ll see tomorrow night.

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  56. OECD rank 22 kiwi (2,752 comments) says:

    Already voted, thanks. :cool:

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  57. Ross Elliot (83 comments) says:

    Reid is right. Key doesn’t get it. He’s not consciously inheriting the Douglas-Richardson legacy: he’s a walk-the-fine-line sorta bloke. But that won’t save us.

    Fact is, someone with balls would restart the Douglas-Richardson policy, even by stealth, and let the Devil take the hindmost.

    Fuck ‘em all. New Zealand is too important to have wankers running it. Kia kaha!

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  58. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    Jack, like I said, he’s better than Hulun. Yes, he will win the election. Yes, he is a quick study. So what?

    His flagship productivity policy is fast broadband. Whoopee.

    That BTW is a Keynesian approach, but that’s just by the by I guess. There is no vision in that and it’s playing at the margins (i.e. not attacking the root causes) and it will have a miniscule effect on the economy as a whole. It would be a minor but not major boost if these were normal times but they aren’t and he continues to talk as if they were. As I said, I understand that during an election campaign, you can’t scare the horses, particularly those horses too stupid to see more than the next few weeks ahead since they’re the majority of the country. However as I said we need radical plays: e.g. completely change our focus on our traditional markets, because those markets aren’t going to be buying our produce at least for the next two-three years and probably beyond.

    I think perhaps that some people here just hate Hulun so much they’ve grasped the alternative with rose-tinted glasses. Frankly I’ve never owned any myself.

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  59. grumpyoldhori (2,362 comments) says:

    Owen McShane
    Why should the average Maori voter on the average wage go for the Nats, like all other voters should they not be asking, what is in it for me ?
    Cynical, yep, I was an early member of that party, every time I hear a Nat MP go on about how bad socialism is I roar with laughter.
    Maori owe Nats what ?

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  60. grumpyoldhori (2,362 comments) says:

    Ross Elliot
    It would be amusing to see Key dumped as leader after the Nats get in and Douglas installed as finance minister.
    But, would the majority of the Nats be happy knowing they will get only one
    term ?
    Don’t hold an election in 2011, that would be fun.

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  61. Ross Elliot (83 comments) says:

    George, Key won’t be dumped. Who you gonna call? Bill English? Spare me.

    John Key is not a bad man. Far from it. But he’s a pragmatic man. The type that National has far too often been subject to.

    National is not the future, but it’ll do for now.

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  62. Robert Black (423 comments) says:

    Bill English was at Selwyn College with my brother same year, Otago University, all male hostel, as I also attended, a great institution, but in my year they let in beavers. About 12 if I remember! (boy did those beavers suffer!). A shame to hear John Harraway suffered from the collegiate powers in later years.

    Simon Botherway was just a scared little fresher in my second year, now a boring banker wanker, or something like that.

    Anyway, back to the topic, my bro said Bill English was like a boring member, always in the background with the hard studying Chogies and Indians, rarely drunk.

    Oh well, you get that with politicians, waiting to pounce, waiting their time.

    There was there two dicks in my law classes as I recall, ones surname was Laws and the other oh, he was too boring to remember, but I hear he is like nearly a Cabinet Minister now, God he was a boring asshole, I am sure his name will come to me later. Cuntlicker, that was it David Cunninglingus, something like that.

    Oh nice to remember old times!

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  63. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    Chances are, grumpy, that in 2011 the reef-fish a.k.a. horses who give us our govts won’t understand that on 8/11/09 the Nats were handed a basket-case that would have taxed the wisdom of Solomon.

    The Nats, bless them, aren’t very good at lies at least by comparison with Liarbore and so they may only get one term anyway, with or without Douglas.

    The point is, everyone who understands economics apart from a very small minority of leftist-economists such as those employed by the unions, thinks what Douglas did in 1984 was the right thing. Everyone in Treasury thinks that. Everyone in business thinks that. The reef-fish don’t think that because they don’t fucking think, they just passively absorb the subliminal messages, which Liarbore has been very astute in propagating, with the explicit and somewhat naive help of the media. Point is, if the majority of doctors and specialists tell you that you have a problem but a few quacks and the majority of the public say you don’t, who are you going to believe?

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  64. Ross Elliot (83 comments) says:

    What’s a beaver?

    Other than the animal and a euphemistic female body part, that is…

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  65. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    Ross, it all starts when a man and a woman meet and fall in love…

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  66. adc (595 comments) says:

    I’d say 75% of the homes in this country having fibre within 6 years is a damn good reason NOT to vote for a party.

    What a waste of money that would be! Sure it would be nice to have fibre, but you won’t be able to afford the data charges.

    I already have a fibre. If you want more than 2Mbps international bandwidth allowance uncapped, you are paying a couple grand a month.

    So fibre, whoopeee. Noone will be able to afford the data charges, and we’ll bankrupt the country putting it in. It’s not cheap to lay fibre.

    I’d rather that money went on something a leetle bit higher priority thanks – DSL2 will do fine for now.

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  67. adc (595 comments) says:

    ps fibre at work, DSL at home…

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  68. Dazzaman (1,140 comments) says:

    Can feel a lot of excitement and anticipation here. I can hear the bells!!! Ding, dong, ding, dong,……The wicked witch is dead!!!

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  69. Dazzaman (1,140 comments) says:

    “like all other voters should they not be asking, what is in it for me ?” grumpyoldhori

    What’s in it for me?!!! Duh. Hori, whose going to pay for the “What”!!!!

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  70. Ross Elliot (83 comments) says:

    Ross, it all starts when a man and a woman meet and fall in love…

    Thanks, I’ll try to remember that… and if any ladies are keen?

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  71. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    It’s a shame that when he loses Cullen won’t care too much. He’s left his legacy. A glorious golden time of social justice and unfettered growth. One of the best Finance Ministers we’ve ever had his supporters will say. He’ll probably write a book about it: MJS II.

    Shame he really is such a (insert OECD’s link)

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  72. Don the Kiwi (1,762 comments) says:

    National by a landslide.

    YEEE AAA HOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!! :-) :-) :lol: :-)

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  73. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    Not too sure myself Ross, but I believe there’s a beaver involved somewhere.

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  74. jastowns (126 comments) says:

    john key will do all he can to take wealth from many,he will sell public assets,change will be the only thing left in your pockets by the time hes through
    key is a new world order stooge
    he will win the election and he will fuck nz by design
    all the key supporters will be left scratching there asses asking why they didnt see it coming
    helens bad but she wont hold a candle to keys

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  75. Dazzaman (1,140 comments) says:

    That’s an awful link OECD rank 22 kiwi….I would never use that term to describe a woman…..Cullen & Clark yes, a woman no!

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  76. adc (595 comments) says:

    Thanks to iPredict, I’m now really looking forward to the election – I can’t lose. I put a shitload of money on Hulun, so if I lose the money I’m very happy, and if Hulun wins, I win enough cash to drown my sorrows for a while…

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  77. Dazzaman (1,140 comments) says:

    jastowns……kaboom!!! Dropkick back to loserville…..the standard, or wherever troll HQ is.

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  78. Dazzaman (1,140 comments) says:

    jastowns=conspiracy theorist=NZFirst voter=looking for a new leader to unthinkingly follow over the cliff to oblivion

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  79. OECD rank 22 kiwi (2,752 comments) says:

    A good article by Bernard Hickey over at Interest.co.nz on the need for change:
    Opinion: 11 charts showing why we need a new government

    I think someone has just earned themselves a place on the upcoming honours list.

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  80. iaroha (3 comments) says:

    This may sound like a silly question but I just posted here for the first time and received this comment attached on my post:

    “Says: Your comment is awaiting moderation”

    Can someone please tell me what that means ? Have I somehow transgressed this blog’s policy and if so does that mean I am supposed to modify my post or will the mod do that for me ?

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  81. iago (18 comments) says:

    “DPF, I aplogise in advance and will take my punishment without complaint.
    Iago, you are a stupid motherfucker.
    I can only assume that cancer has never touched you or your family. As angry as I am I do not wish it to be so.. others may be less charitable.”

    Thanks for the personal attacks.

    But we are not talking about some miracle drug here, it is only proven to be effective in a small number of people, but it has gained a large amount of publicity. If National had promised to give Pharmac additional funding, and Herceptin happened to be covered by this I wouldn’t have a problem. But they have made a promise to fund Herceptin rather than allow Pharmac to make that decision (perhaps there were other cancer drugs they would have considered worthy of funding). I’m not sure I am conformtable with the precedent it sets, do we now fund drugs for whoever shouts the loudest.

    I’ll probably vote National later today so don’t hate me too much.

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  82. paradigm (452 comments) says:

    I strongly disagree with the people in this discussion thread calling for National to introduce sweeping right wing changes. In general such changes cause some short to mid term negative effects, with much of the positives not manifesting within a term of government. What this means is the economically illiterate public see the right wing party has having caused nothing but trouble, and proceed to dump them at the next election. Then the left wing get in just around the time that the economy starts to benefit from the reforms, and the benefits of the economic reforms are instead attributed to the left wing party. The left wing party is trumpeted as heros, and get multiple terms in office (as seen with our Labour party). They then proceed to send the country “up the boohai”. I note that this has not only been seen here, but also in other countries such as Finland. What we need at this juncture is incremental right wing changes over several terms of government. In that regard I agree strongly with Act’s suggestion that we reduce or hault new spending instead of just slashing our current government spending.

    On the note of prosperity being incorrectly attributed to left wing parties see Russel Brown as written a pathetic appologist piece for the Helen Clark government at Hard News, praising them as a party that achieved record low unemployment and reduced public debt. I wonder if he can quote any specific labour party policy that led to the favourable economic conditions they enjoyed for most of their time in government, or whether it was simply a combination of favourable international conditions and the hard reforms from the previous governments starting to bear fruit.

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  83. iaroha (3 comments) says:

    Iago I agree with your third para but not the last.

    There is plenty of information out there now telling us that a large % of cancers can actually be PREVENTED (I’m a health professional with an interest in this). Another reason why I’m voting Green … because Green Party policy is directed towards prevention as the priority in health care (unlike Mr Key who appears to favour the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff approach).

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  84. OECD rank 22 kiwi (2,752 comments) says:

    Russell Brown is a weasel. Thankfully he’s soon to get the sack from his taxpayer funded job. :lol:

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  85. jastowns (126 comments) says:

    goodbye helen hello police state,more cameras,less rights,i wonder if the change you dicks talk of is the same change that England had when they went from blair to brown,ask anyone who lives there,what fucken change its worse than ever over there
    wake the fuck up this line has been used all over the world and nothing has change only got worse
    i wonder how long it will take you fucken left or right dipshits to realize there has been no change, one,two years will any of you have the balls to admit you were wrong or will you hold on for the third year

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  86. OECD rank 22 kiwi (2,752 comments) says:

    The change doesn’t happen in the UK until 2010 when Brown final has to face the electorate. Labour will lose big time and the Conservatives will come to power. Kiss goodbye to ID cards at that point.

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  87. Nomestradamus (3,344 comments) says:

    Jastowns:

    You’re carving out a niche for yourself as Kiwiblog’s conspiracy theorist, or village idiot (whichever you prefer). Unfortunately, with today being election day, we can’t discuss specific policy. But I’ll be expecting you to produce “the truth” (with irrefutable evidence) that you keep wittering on about. And, no, dodgy links to crackpot YouTube videos (which is the sum and total of your “case” to date) don’t count – I want to see references to reputable websites.

    Or is it just easier to admit you’re wrong?

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  88. Nomestradamus (3,344 comments) says:

    Oh goodness, I’ve just noticed I posted exactly one hour after Jastowns did – 1.21am and 2.21am – and on the same day even! Spooky! In Jastowns’ world, does that mean tick… tick… boom? :)

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  89. paradigm (452 comments) says:

    Jastowns said:
    “…dicks… …fucken… …fuck… …fucken…”

    A fair while ago, I got told gratuetous foul language was a sign of rank ignorance. I am not really seeing any evidence to the contrary here (but then again the people who told me this were probably conspirators set out to erode popular support for Jastowns’ opposition to the new world order).

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  90. Nomestradamus (3,344 comments) says:

    Paradigm:

    You strike me as a very open-minded person.

    This is Jastowns’ first comment on Kiwiblog. It’s being provided for, er, strictly educational purposes, you’ll understand.

    And, boy, does Jastowns have a cracker of a story to tell:

    November 4th, 2008 at 7:45 pm

    there is much more going on than you have been told
    just prove me wrong only one rule no government info unless its from japan, italy,russia,iran,they know the truth and have started to release there info to the public not that any of you will see it unless you look outside main stream media

    November 4th, 2008 at 8:17 pm

    i am a free thinker that will not be told what to believe,i make up my own mind from the research i gather ,please prove me wrong,

    November 4th, 2008 at 11:05 pm

    i read most of your comments and know government propaganda is working well
    i never lie,and what is on these two vids is the most important info you will ever see
    info most of you need

    Such a promising start. I can’t wait for the next instalment from Jastowns!

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  91. OECD rank 22 kiwi (2,752 comments) says:

    It’s payback time for the EFA. Labour must pay for subjecting the electorate the this grossly unjust law.

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  92. Andrew W (1,629 comments) says:

    testing

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  93. reid (16,509 comments) says:

    Well I guess conspiracy theory or truth is a safe topic to talk about this morning, so apologies for the diversion but since there ain’t no comments on the General Debate…

    Jastown you may be correct in many respects – I don’t know what your beliefs actually are so I can’t judge but mate, you’re wasting your breath. If you’re really passionate about flagging the issues because of their inherent importance then I suggest you setup your own site and tell the story in a logical concise way with as much objective transparent evidence and background as possible.

    Most people won’t accept anything you say or even look into it, because your suggestions and allegations break their paradigm of how they believe the world works. That paradigm has been built up over their lifetime and the more interested they are in politics, military, finance and general institutional frameworks, the stronger it is. This is why most people won’t accept that the official 911 story is full of holes even though that is transparently obvious. They can’t and won’t look at it objectively as a forensic investigator might, because they can’t and won’t be objective since it involves breaking their paradigm of how the world works. The secret of course is to ignore the questions of who did it, how they did it and why they did it and concentrate purely on the official story and how believable that is.

    A paradigm is a huge thing to change in people because it involves changing your lifetime investment in emotional as well as intellectual issues. To explain what a paradigm is, look at the internet and compare computing pre and post internet. The internet is a new paradigm in computing and look at the changes it has wrought.

    Paradigms in politics are things like communism vs capitalism; democracy vs regimes like Burma/NK and conservatism vs socialism.

    See how easy it is to look at something that’s completely objective like computing and talk about paradigms but as you move into politics and institutions it becomes much more emotional.

    The more emotional people are about it, the more those people on either side of the paradigm will take completely opposite conclusions from exactly the same event and furthermore they’ll be absolutely vehement in their defence of their position, their passion rising depending on how far they are toward either end of the spectrum.

    Look at how we conservatives argue against the lefties and we’re both convinced we’re right and importantly that we can justify our conclusions scientifically, by pointing to the conditions in the world that we observe.

    Unlike computing, we can’t and don’t argue the toss objectively although importantly, we absolutely believe that we are indeed being objective.

    That’s what people who see things in conspiracy so-called “theory” are up against when they try to alert people to it and that’s why most people dismiss it out of hand – they don’t and they won’t even consider it.

    Shame I won’t be here for the rest of the day but if you want a good Kiwi conspiracy theory jastown then google “Opal file.”

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  94. ross (1,437 comments) says:

    Gordon Campbell, a Left-wing commentator on Scoop, yesterday stated the following:

    “If MMP enabled the major party that came in a distant second in tomorrow’s election to form the winning team, I think there would be such outrage up and down the country – wrong-headed or not, it would happen – that MMP would quickly join the audio cassette and CB radio in the dustbin of history”.

    I think he is spot on. MMP has already suffered by the fact that a candidate can be heavily defeated in an electorate seat and still make into Parliament on the list (and potentially become a Minister!). MMP will suffer even more if the runner-up in this election is able to govern. I would like to see the losing party accept its loss gracefully and to invite the winner to form the next government. I’d also like MMP tweaked so that firstly, the winning party must be given first choice of forming a government, and secondly, the number of list MPs is reduced to, say, 20. In other words, the vast majority of seats should be electorate seats.

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  95. jcuknz (704 comments) says:

    If we were to follow the intent of the electoral act then all blogs would be dissabled from midnight [0001 hours] to 7pm[1900hrs] on Election Day …. I only found this thread today [election day]

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  96. adc (595 comments) says:

    when I say it’s not cheap to lay fibre, I’m talking about in the order of hundreds of thousands of dollars per km kind of not cheap.

    If you really think the country should spend tens of billions of dollars putting in fibre to homes, then what will be left? This would make Cullen’s trainset look like a good idea.

    I did my masters thesis on fibre. I use and pay for one at my office. I have the quotes for how much it cost to drag the fibre 120m up the road to our building (40k). I pay the bill for the international data charges. Hands up who else knows anything about it.

    So negative karma me if you like, but really, if we spend all the country’s money on putting in fibre to every home (even just in urban centres), we won’t have any money left for things like education or health. There are better things to spend that kind of money on, especially since DSL2 will give you over 20Mbps without having to dig a single trench.

    Now an upgraded fibre backbone I would support. And an upgraded international link. That would actually provide more usable bandwidth over existing access technologies. We aren’t even maxing out (not even close) DSL in most cases.

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  97. jastowns (126 comments) says:

    reid how right you are,yes my world did change with 911 and the realization that Muslims had nothing to do with that dreadful day,then my awakening,its not easy to admit everything you know is bullshit,a myth like santa,
    the reason i come here to this site is not because i like to be insulted,it is because most here still believe in the tooth fairy(so to speak)and i promise all that read this i am not a lyre nor have i ever been
    to find out all main stream media is owned by those setting the agenda is the wake up
    you all think 911 was done by muslims because the media has told you this but what if they are lying to us
    the numbers are growing at a amazing rate that dont believe the offical 911 story (WHY)
    please go to you tube and watch LOOSE CHANGE 2 at least give it a go if you still think that the millions of people that know the truth are crazy then so be it,at least you will know where im coming from,

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  98. Banana Llama (1,043 comments) says:

    Jastowns

    Maybe CIA trained operatives that had gone rogue and based themselves in Afghanistan had enough nouse and daring to formulate and execute this plan which took America by surprise, maybe people find this the most hardest thing to believe.

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  99. PhilBest (5,125 comments) says:

    Jastowns, you and your type are stark, raving lunatics.

    There is hardly an anti-American crowd guru more revered than Noam Chomsky. He may be politically sick in the head, but he is not so stark, raving bonkers as to buy that stuff. Listen to him on the subject HERE:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BzGd0t8v-d4

    (And that is “Part One”, follow the embeds for Part 2)

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  100. PhilBest (5,125 comments) says:

    RRM (1303) Vote: Add rating 0 Subtract rating 1 Says:
    November 7th, 2008 at 5:15 pm

    “These are all good reasons – hence when the Nats win tomorrow (and they will) you won’t see me on here decrying Key’s election as the worst thing that’s happened to the country since Pearl Harbour or 9/11.

    (Time and place for everything, eh Phil?…..”

    OK, RRM, I’m not going to live that one down, am I. (Unless something unthinkable actually happens…..and I truly hope not, for America’s sake and the whole world’s).

    Here’s what the estimable Victor Davis Hanson said, and that is how I SHOULD have put it:

    “…..the suicide of both print and electronic journalism has ensured that, should Barack Obama be elected president, the public will only then learn what they should have known far earlier about their commander-in-chief — but in circumstances and from sources they may well regret……”

    By the way, that is a surprisingly decent summary of yours about John Key, considering you’re a lefty about to see his team lose. But I suspect that deep down, you’d like to see Labour get back to its decent workingman and Catholic roots and give away the social engineering, nanny state, feminism, “sexual revolution”, and political correctness stuff………eh? But I don’t know who’s going to do it, as the party has been irretrievably stacked over the last few years.

    I’ll return your compliment about John Key, and say that I admired David Lange most of the time, likewise Mike Moore, I also thought well of Clayton Cosgrove and Damien O’Conner, and I think John Tamihere was right, the best man in the party, but he was too little, too late to rescue the Labour Party from the Trojan Horse takeover it has experienced at the hands of the “H” brigade. Perhaps he can be brought back if the “Goff moderates” prevail over the next 3 years?

    Furthermore, I don’t know if I’ve ever commented before here, I always thought the Republicans overdid the mean-spirited pursuit of Bill Clinton, and invited a backlash as a consequence. Clinton deserved credit as a “least bad” option in a necessary Democratic Presidential interlude in US politics. It will be difficult now for them to look appropriately righteously indignant over a “worst bad” Democratic President.

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  101. Owen McShane (1,226 comments) says:

    Grumpyoldhori,
    The Maori Party do not owe the Nats anything.
    However, the Maori were guaranteed their rights in property under Article 2 of the Treaty and a right wing grouping is more likely to protect and even strengthen those property rights than the left which are determined to undermine them.
    Look at the Te Arai development proposed by Te Uri O Hau. There seems little point in Waitange settlements which give Maori their land back but then refuse to let them use it. When DoC gangs up on Maori landowners with their allies the EDS and Forest and Bird the Maori landowners do not stand a chance – nor do the rest of us for that matter. DoC has major government funding to attack the use of private property and the MfE funds EDS and Forest and Bird too.
    It would not be hard to persuade a National Led government to repeal the Foreshore and Seabed act (which simply stole Maori property rights) and especially so if they are in coalition with Act.
    A coalition with a Labour grouping with the Greens etc may have some warm fuzzy attraction but they will rather have you as dependent beneficiaries rather than prosperous independent citizens living your own life on your own land.
    You might like to read a paper I gave on this topic to an Act organised conference, at:
    http://rmastudies.org.nz/documents/foreshore.pdf
    I wrote this paper in 2003 but this short paragraph was surely prescient:

    “No doubt this will not stop DoC taking exclusive ownership of large areas of accessible foreshores and seabed because DoC has total confidence in its belief that it should own and manage the whole country.
    I can understand that if you are the world’s largest possum farmer, then you need all the land you can get. But I suspect that by the time we have sorted out this current debate we will wake up and find half the seabed has been taken from us anyhow – but by DoC rather than by Maori.”

    DoC’s new marine park on the west coast of Auckland has been put in place to effectively expunge a mining right to the iron sands, a licence properly held but now effectively valueless. Why would anyone invest in New Zealand? But DoC and their friends regard all mining as raping of the Earth Mother. So grumpyoldhori I would get that greenstone while you still can!

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  102. Robert Black (423 comments) says:

    That’s what you get for letting Mussies into New Zealand.

    Oh the insanity!

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  103. Dazzaman (1,140 comments) says:

    “I strongly disagree with the people in this discussion thread calling for National to introduce sweeping right wing changes.”  paradigm
    What you say is true regarding the short/medium term “pains” of the needed economic reforms but the pain of not doing so, which is being keenly felt now (even before the current economic crisis hit) will only be exacerbated the longer they are left. Have to endure to gain the rewards!

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