Fight crime at birth says Tamihere

April 3rd, 2009 at 8:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

West Auckland’s Waipareira Trust wants access to hospital maternity wards to start tackling the “drivers of crime” from birth.

The trust’s chief executive, , plans to use a summit meeting on the drivers of crime at Parliament today to propose a radical devolution of welfare funding to community groups.

He wants to be funded to cut youth offending in Waitakere by 5 or 10 per cent by target dates, rather than to work with young offenders only after they have committed crimes.

Sounds good to me.

Mr Tamihere said the current response to crime was ineffective.

“The problem is that there are 173 groups in Waitakere City putting their hands up for youth-related matters. Furthermore, all their services run nine-to-five, not from 10pm to 6am when all the shit happens.

“We are going to roll out a service in the next three months looking at that, and we have 85 Maori wardens and we’ll start to come together.”

He said the trust was “negotiating access to the maternity wards” to start working with problem families from birth.

Those first few years are critical in determining if someone is likely to have a life of crime or a life of work.

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22 Responses to “Fight crime at birth says Tamihere”

  1. andrei (2,430 comments) says:

    Another well meaning start but it will end up the way it always does, a bunch of parasites achieving diddly while sucking at the taxpayers tit.

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  2. CraigM (692 comments) says:

    “The problem is that there are 173 groups in Waitakere City putting their hands up for youth-related matters. Furthermore, all their services run nine-to-five, not from 10pm to 6am when all the shit happens.”

    173 !! How much of taxpayers money is spent on these 173 groups?

    Isn’t this just a calsssic example of milking the system so that some public servant/service or funding provider can say they are doing something constructive? How is success measured? Why isn’t the government already coordinating all these groups?

    I wonder what could be achieved if all of those groups and people with common objectives, worked together. How many are actually making a difference and how many are riding the gravy train?

    173 groups – staggering. How come there is still youth crime in Waitakere?

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  3. david (2,482 comments) says:

    One thing you could put the house on is that the better organised will be receiving “help” from several of the 173 groups simultaneously.

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  4. bharmer (686 comments) says:

    DPF says “Those first few years are critical in determining if someone is likely to have a life of crime or a life of work”

    These so-called drivers of crime, though influential, are not an infallible predictor of outcomes. John Tamihere presumably had a similar early childhood to that of his brother, with widely different results.

    The message that needs to be understood is that we are each responsible for our own choices, regardless of our infancy experiences.

    [DPF: Oh I agree. People do make a choice. But that choice is easier if you grow up in a household where you are not abused, where parents are working, where there is not a drug and alcohol culture, where you are sent to school ect etc.]

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  5. Komata (971 comments) says:

    CraigM

    I wonder if we have missed an important point.

    173 Groups – agreed, but how many of these groups are MAORI (or PacI) groups ‘helping their own’?

    A most important factor – any bets that the majority of them actually are from those ethnic groupings?

    If so, then the fact that there is such a large number becomes perfectly reasonable: the wonder is that there are not actually MORE!!

    Maori, and PacI, in case you haven’t noticed, are very adept at using ‘the system’ for their own gains – and don’t even THINK of asking for a financial breakdown or where the money actually went – it’s a bottomless hole that the European mind has no way of ever commprehending.

    No accountability, and no trace of where it went – money launderers are amateurs by comparison with these people.

    And if the money is ever turned off? Or even thought about being turned off?

    Welll, there is always ‘The Treaty’ and cries about racism and disadvantage, and bias – and lies to a compliant media with ‘the usual suspects’ in ‘instantaneous attendance’ just for effect.

    It would be intereasting to get a break-down of the ethnicity of those concerned, though I doubt very much that we ever will – at least not from the MSM.

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  6. Inventory2 (9,788 comments) says:

    I would not be at all surprised to see Tamihere’s name appear on the National Party list in 2011. He has far more in common with John Key et al than he ever had with Helen Clark and her cohorts.

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  7. Patrick Starr (3,675 comments) says:

    “and we have 85 Maori wardens and we’ll start to come together.”

    just more of the same old bullshit. Maori Wardens aren’t going to break a culture of single parent welfare dependancy

    ““negotiating access to the maternity wards” to start working with problem families from birth”

    cut off the DPB and you dont need to go to the maternity ward

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  8. CraigM (692 comments) says:

    Komata – I would imagine you are correct.

    It is what I was alluding to with my gravy train comment. :-)

    Me, I’m just a middle age white guy who earns a good dollar. My sole purpose in the community we call NZ is to pay tax so thers can freeload.

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  9. Razork (374 comments) says:

    It is a pity that John tamihere has manged to shoot himself in the foot a couple of times as i believe he could have been quite special.

    But the Waipareira trust money thing must always hang over him and I can’t see him fulfilling half of what he could have.

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  10. insider (990 comments) says:

    Silly names with unusual spellings, the kind you’d expect to see on some hoodied bling laden golden toothed hip hop “artiste”, and too many apostrophes is a good warning sign.

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  11. Lou (43 comments) says:

    Inventory2 I was going to suggest something similiar, but you beat me to it!
    I’d love to see John back out there punching and kicking in the political ring, and why not do it under John’s big happy tent.

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  12. boomtownprat (281 comments) says:

    Tamihere, national candidate for Mt Albert 09?

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  13. Inventory2 (9,788 comments) says:

    BTP – no, but Lee at Monkey With Typewriter reckons Michael Jones could be in the running.

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  14. slightlyrighty (2,448 comments) says:

    The biggest indicator that a male child is likely to embark on a life of crime is the absence of a father in that boys life. I have always felt that the DBP, as well intentioned as it was, has allowed young women to exclude fathers all too easily, rather than try and work through relationship issues.

    I am fully aware that there are number of women and children who are safer away from the monsters that have entered their lives, but there are many couples who just find the relationship too hard and the DBP gives them a soft option. There are also a number of young women who see motherhood as a path to more state income.

    I am also aware that there are a number solo mothers who have raised fine young men who have gone on to achieve great things. John Key is one example.

    But those young men who end up in a life of crime, and joined to gangs, generally have come from a broken home, usually with no father figure on which to model themselves on. Any move to target potential criminals from birth must include a review of government policy that adds to the problems faced. The Domestic Purposes Benefit, though well intentioned, is one such government policy.

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  15. dad4justice (7,406 comments) says:

    slightlyrighty – every prisoner I talk to these days states that the main reason for their offending was a lack of a role model father in all the all important childhood nurturing years. Sadly the gangs supply a sense of belonging and acceptance.

    Fatherlessness is encouraged by welfare agencies, CYFS, lawyers and psychologists in the femily court gravy train, child extortion payments, gender bias police and the feminazis in government.

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  16. big bruv (12,352 comments) says:

    “lack of a father”…”lack of a male role model”….blah blah blah.

    What a lot of utter bullshit.

    There are hundreds of kids who are raised perfectly well in one parent families, there are hundreds of single parents doing a bloody great job.
    The reason these low life blame the lack of a father figure is because they can!..it is easier to look to blame somebody else than take personal responsibility and sadly there is a long line of idiots who accept the lack of a father figure as an excuse.

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  17. s.russell (1,486 comments) says:

    “Another well meaning start but it will end up the way it always does, a bunch of parasites achieving diddly while sucking at the taxpayers tit.”

    So what do you propose? Do nothing? Abandon hope? Stop trying to solve the problems?

    You are also wrong about what people achieve. There are a lot of small-scale programmes that do achieve positive results. The success is usually because of the extraordinary dedication of extraordinary individuals (which is why it is hard to scale them up).

    The benefit to the whole community of getting just one person diverted off the path of crime and chaos and onto a path of productive life is huge. It is worth making the effort even when numerical results are small.

    Giving up and not trying is NOT an option. Shame on you for suggesting it.

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  18. baxter (893 comments) says:

    TAMIHERE::::::::::”:The problem is that there are 173 groups in Waitakere City putting their hands up for youth-related matters. Furthermore, all their services run nine-to-five, not from 10pm to 6am when all the shit happens.”

    This was always a major problem when I was in the Police, especially on weekends and holidays. I might add in our case I always found the Maori Wardens the best agency to deal with, no paperwork, prompt action…I would support allowing Tamihere to run his scheme as a trial.

    I don’t see this talkfest embracing anything other than further social-work action. The Police and Corrections headquarters representatives will represent social bureaucratic views not coalface views, and the others will be social workers promoting dubious international research propositions. Back to basics is whats required more discipline enforced at all levels with appropriate sanctions for breaches.. What we will get is unfortunately the reverse.

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  19. Inventory2 (9,788 comments) says:

    baxter said “Back to basics is whats required more discipline enforced at all levels with appropriate sanctions for breaches..”

    Couldn’t agree more baxter. I well remember when my former step-daughter threw her toys out of the cot – she’d had yet another barney with her mother and wanted to move out, but she was too young for the “leave home, stay at school and board with someone” allowance or whatever it was called. Sheesh – you would have thought we were calling for a return to slavery!! “I’ve got rights!” she squealed. I reminded her that rights came as part of a package with responsibilities, which pissed her off even more :-)

    But that’s the nub of it – liberal, left-leaning teachers are filling kids’ heads with a completely distorted worldview, where everything is arse-about-face, where kids have rights but don’t have to take responsibility for anything, and where there are no consequences whatsoever for inappropriate or antisocial behaviour. The sad thing is, it’s going to take at least a generation to turn around.

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  20. Lee C (4,516 comments) says:

    If I may, David, here is my take on this:
    http://monkeyswithtypewriter.blogspot.com/2009/04/hidden-poverty-of-helen-clark.html

    Thnx Lee – MWT

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  21. Patrick Starr (3,675 comments) says:

    LeeC/Inventory2

    you were querying the Mt Albert demographic

    here’s the 2001 model. Maori are behind pacific and well behind asian

    http://www2.stats.govt.nz/domino/external/web/CommProfiles.nsf/FindInfobyArea/517800-au

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  22. kiki (425 comments) says:

    The trust should go further and not just turn up at the maternity ward they should get in before the problem starts and slide in between the couples in bed. If John positioned himself carefully between the couples the problem could be solved.

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