Broken Boughs

October 13th, 2009 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

An interesting 68 page report from Maxim on the role of effective family interventions. They have actually done an evaluation of the dufferent family intervention programmes.

Their conclusion is:

We conclude that the preferred approach to family intervention is to develop and implement programmes that are family-focused, intervene early and are targeted to children and families that are at risk or experiencing actual problems.

They evaluate seven programmes:

  • Family Start
  • Parents as First Teachers
  • Early Start
  • Whanau Toko I Te Ora
  • The Parenting Programme;
  • Incredible Years
  • Triple P.

And their recommendations:

  1. Three programmes should be further implemented and funded: Early Start, the Incredible Years and Triple P.
  2. A comprehensive review of exemplary, evidence-based home visitation and parent management training programmes should
    be undertaken to identify other programmes that might be suitable for implementation and funding in New Zealand.
  3. Funding should be carefully allocated. Existing funding from unproven and/or ineffective programmes like Family Start and Parents as First Teachers should be reallocated to evidence-based programmes.
    Continued funding should be conditional on programmes continuing to demonstrate that they are effective and delivered with fidelity.
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14 Responses to “Broken Boughs”

  1. tristanb (1,127 comments) says:

    Yeah, Maxim says that. But what does FHM say?

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  2. Pete George (23,559 comments) says:

    Who’s a duffer?

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  3. fizzleplug (72 comments) says:

    Just because the Poms find our accent super doesn’t mean we have to start spelling things dufferently

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  4. backster (2,171 comments) says:

    We just gotta have Whanau Toko I Te Ora….cost not a problem ,and it will help us understand the World Cup Rugby Commentary.

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  5. getstaffed (9,186 comments) says:

    We conclude that the preferred approach to family intervention is to develop and implement programmes that are family-focused, intervene early and are targeted to children and families that are at risk or experiencing actual problems

    And there’s the problem. Our inability to differentiate correlative from causative factors, combined with public timidity in the face of bleeding heart liberals who scream racism, wealth’ism or whatever-else’ism will stymie any progress. Sadly.

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  6. malcolm (1,952 comments) says:

    Maxim; the Families Commission which costs us nothing.

    I don’t agree with much of what Maxim say and I find the thin veil they put over their obvious Christian ideology a little puzzling and slightly creepy, however I think NZ needs more of these private think tanks.

    Anyway, good on them.

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  7. side show bob (3,660 comments) says:

    Oh great more caring and sharing twaddle, more bullshit for the masses. For fucks sake the country is broke, so the taxpayer is now being asked for further funding, like the numerous other intervention schemes are raving successes. I wonder it Maxim have considered the further financial strain this will place on the budget. Given the way things are something like this could be the straw that breaks the camels back. What will be the outcome if NZ goes down the shithouse, how many families will go belly up then.

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  8. RRM (9,917 comments) says:

    SSB: Aren’t they talking about reallocating funding already in place for other programmes, to where they believe it will do more good?

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  9. RRM (9,917 comments) says:

    PS it is interesting that a “think tank” is to be admired – whereas, should you dare to form a lefty political party and presume to suggest an agenda to improve the country’s lot, then the prevailing view is that which the Rodent expressed here yesterday:

    “[they] just want power because they think they are smarter and more caring than everyone else and therefore should get to boss the rest of us around. They are driven by conceit and arrogance not respect and intelligence.”

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  10. Brian Smaller (4,023 comments) says:

    Not having read the report, does it say how effective these “interventions” are? Do 10% or 90% of these disfunctional familes move on to be productive citizens, stop murdering their kids, stop stealing everything that isn’t nailed down and get a work ethic?

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  11. Pete George (23,559 comments) says:

    RRM: Aren’t they talking about reallocating funding already in place for other programmes, to where they believe it will do more god?

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  12. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    I’m with Brian’s comment.
    We need to lock up the bad ones, rehabilitate those that can be and start early so we don’t have to rehabilitate in the first place.
    so at least this report is a start and yes it all costs money.
    Rather the little at the beginning than the fortune throughout their lifetimes.

    I’ll believe it when I see National openly data sharing between govt depts and focusing on the “at risk families”, all few thousand of them and leaving the majority of ordinary families alone.

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  13. Viking2 (11,467 comments) says:

    Not the same subject but entirely related. This survey result released today. Its about knowing about yourself and knowing about relationships. No mystery to these things and so this survey correlates quite well with what the MI are on about.

    Kiwi sex: We want to know what love is
    NZPA
    Last updated 17:26 13/10/2009

    Most New Zealanders would have liked to learn more about the emotional side of sex during their sex education, says a survey by condom maker Durex.

    Sex education in New Zealand was dominated by “facts of life” topics such as puberty, pregnancy and menstruation, according to the latest Durex Sexual Wellbeing survey, released today.

    However, 63 percent of New Zealanders surveyed said they wished their sex education had covered the emotional side of sex as well.

    Also featuring high on the wish-list was abortion, with 39 percent wishing this topic had been covered, and more than a third wished they had been taught more about HIV/Aids (37 percent).

    Half wished relationships had been covered.

    Forty-three percent who had sex education at school said they did not learn about contraception and a similar number (44 percent) were not taught about sexually transmitted infections (STIs). This was higher in the older age groups.

    Durex NZ manager David Rae said that while some of the findings were expected, there were a few that were surprising.

    “It is evident from the research Kiwis wished they were better informed about health issues associated with sex, such as HIV/Aids, contraception and STIs. This is of concern given the high incidence of STIs in this country,” he said.

    At the other end of the spectrum New Zealanders clearly want to know more about the emotional side of sex, aspects including respect and mutual enjoyment for both partners, he said.

    Despite the explosion in teenage media and the internet, school sex education was still cited as a major source of information for 60 percent of New Zealanders who received it – a higher proportion than any other source, the survey found.

    – NZPA

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  14. dimmocrazy (286 comments) says:

    Another example of the backward socialist approach to all and any problems. What’s wrong with families is that their autonomous nature has been severely broken down, while the traditional relationships between procreation and family and the associated set of moral values and responsibilities have been destroyed. The solution is to restore the context and concept of family, not to develop ever more ‘interventions’ whereby a whole raft of social science Willies start creating jobs for their mates while ever further placing the State right at the kitchen table and into the bedroom.

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