Blunt on crying wolf

January 21st, 2010 at 7:17 pm by David Farrar

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16 Responses to “Blunt on crying wolf”

  1. Fletch (6,026 comments) says:

    I must be a bit slow or something, cause I don’t get it…..

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  2. LauraNorda (27 comments) says:

    Fletch, your not the only one. I knew I was thick, but having it confirmed this way is well……..depressing.

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  3. KiwiGreg (3,177 comments) says:

    Remember we were all going to die of swine flu, which turned out to just be flu?

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  4. Jack5 (4,591 comments) says:

    Someone crying wolf about harmless cocker spaniel pups, the swine flu scare that was scarcely more potent than ordinary flu.
    But what does it refer to? Global warming fear mongering? Fears about rising oceans and shrinking glaciers?

    Beats me…

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  5. john.bt (170 comments) says:

    Actually Greg the common or garden flu kills around 400 folk per annum but the swine flu can only do 20. And I found “eschatology” in a Rongotai College dictionary that is about as old as DPF. I will return it one day!

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  6. Rex Widerstrom (5,261 comments) says:

    Never mind bloody swine flu, when are they going to end the alarmism about bird flu?

    If I wanted to bring my beloved parrot home with me I couldn’t, even if I was willing to pay for quarantine and even though it was bred in captivity because somehow or other it might sneeze on a chicken.

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  7. Pete George (22,850 comments) says:

    There was apparently a bit of luck with swine flu, it spread widely but they found that many older people, often more susceptible, had immunity via a previous strain up to fifty years or more earlier. We may not always be that lucky. Nor tolerant of inaction when a bad one strikes.

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  8. Crusader (279 comments) says:

    Wolf! Wolf!

    BTW: What ever happened to catastrophic Anthropogenic Global Warming? Anyone heard the term “tipping point” recently? Weren’t we all supposed to be underwater by now?
    What a crock.

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  9. Pete George (22,850 comments) says:

    A lot of the wolfing (or gross exaggeration) is done by opposition to discredit. Above example illustrates.

    And of course the media are exaggeration junkies.

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  10. xy (152 comments) says:

    This is right up there with ‘well, y2k was obviously never a problem because things didn’t break’ or ‘wearing a seatbelt was stupid because i didn’t crash’.

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  11. Pita (367 comments) says:

    Has anybody else considered the connection between eschatology and scatology with particular reference to creatures of the bovine variety?

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  12. KiwiGreg (3,177 comments) says:

    Let’s not forget http://www.amazon.com/Population-Bomb-Paul-R-Ehrlich/dp/1568495870

    Scared the crap out of me as a teen.

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  13. Swiftman the infidel (329 comments) says:

    For those with an *average* education:

    es⋅cha⋅tol⋅o⋅gy
      /ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒi/ Show Spelled Pronunciation [es-kuh-tol-uh-jee]

    –noun Theology.
    1. any system of doctrines concerning last, or final, matters, as death, the Judgment, the future state, etc.
    2. the branch of theology dealing with such matters.
    Origin:
    1835–45; < Gk éschato(s) last + -logy

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  14. m@tt (588 comments) says:

    What happened to swinageddon?

    A proactive and swift approach minimised the spread and prevented a fast moving virus from mutating in ideal spread conditions. Without the kind of management we saw, as well as a more modern health system, we avoided a repeat of the 1918 flu pandemic.

    But hey, top marks for being an ungrateful prick.

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  15. the deity formerly known as nigel6888 (856 comments) says:

    Or it was another media beat-up m@tt, because the ‘modern health system’ did exactly what it does with every new flu bug, screams for funding.

    fast moving viruses dont respect bureacracy. Swineflu has turned out to be, yes just this years flu variant, and the apocalypse was put off for another season.

    Next!

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  16. Owen McShane (1,226 comments) says:

    For those in a hurry, here is the list of “alarms and excursions” analysed by Green and Armstrong in their paper. Green and Armstrong are not saying there are no correlations or no grounds for concern in any of these cases, but that, in every case, there were extreme but unfounded predictions based on unscientific speculations. Asbestos and lung disease is a good example.
    Note that the list does not include Alarms which were not presumed to be caused by us. Hence no bird flu or swine flu.
    These are analogies with AGW. For the full papers etc go to my web page ref http://www.rmastudies.org.nz/component/search/Armstrong?ordering=&searchphrase=all

    Exhibit 1: Analogies to the alarm over dangerous manmade global warming
    Analogy Year
    1 Population growth and famine (Malthus) 1798
    2 Timber famine economic threat 1865
    3 Uncontrolled reproduction and degeneration (Eugenics) 1883
    4 Lead in petrol and brain and organ damage 1928
    5 Soil erosion agricultural production threat 1934
    6 Asbestos and lung disease 1939
    7 Fluoride in drinking water health effects 1945
    8 DDT and cancer 1962
    9 Population growth and famine (Ehrlich) 1968
    10 Global cooling; through to 1975 1970
    11 Supersonic airliners, the ozone hole, and skin cancer, etc. 1970
    12 Environmental tobacco smoke health effects 1971
    13 Population growth and famine (Meadows) 1972
    14 Industrial production and acid rain 1974
    15 Organophosphate pesticide poisoning 1976
    16 Electrical wiring and cancer, etc. 1979
    17 CFCs, the ozone hole, and skin cancer, etc. 1985
    18 Listeria in cheese 1985
    19 Radon in homes and lung cancer 1985
    20 Salmonella in eggs 1988
    21 Environmental toxins and breast cancer 1990
    22 Mad cow disease (BSE) 1996
    23 Dioxin in Belgian poultry 1999
    24 Mercury in fish effect on nervous system development 2004
    25 Mercury in childhood inoculations and autism 2005
    26 Cell phone towers and cancer, etc. 2008
    Note: What was it about 1985?

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