6.8% unemployment

August 5th, 2010 at 5:29 pm by David Farrar

Wow that is a big jump. I always thought the 6.1% figure last quarter was probably too optimistic (remember the HLFS is only a survey, albeit a large one) so I was expecting a small increase. But this is a large increase.

I tend to think one almost forgets the March 2010 quarter figure (as no one really thinks has risen by 0.7% in a quarter) and focus on that it has gone from 7.1% in Dec to just 6.8% in June 2010. That is not much at all.

Three thoughts:

  1. Stats NZ need to consider why such huge variations from one quarter to another quarter. This shakes confidence a bit in the HLFS.
  2. The Govt becomes far more vulnerable to opposition attacks, now they no longer have “the biggest quarterly employment growth” in history to rely on.
  3. It is becoming quite obvious the recovery is not that robust and needs to be stronger, and this puts pressure on the Government to consider further growth friendly policies – yes even those put out by the 2025 taskforce
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53 Responses to “6.8% unemployment”

  1. Guy Fawkes (702 comments) says:

    They could sell Kiwirail at a profit, couldn’t they.

    As Micky Savage said it was a fabulous deal, and no price was too great to pay for this small guage infrastructure.

    There should be a veritable Q of buyers, and there could be loads of working building rolling stock and engines in anticipation of more roading that actually works.

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  2. freedom101 (504 comments) says:

    The 2025 Taskforce was kicked for touch, in fact kicked right out of the ground, before the ink was dry. So what’s the alternative strategy? It appears that all policies must pass the following tests:
    – no one will lose income
    – won’t cause any street marches
    – Phil Goff would have done it anyway, so Labour can’t oppose it
    – doesn’t reverse any of Labour’s spending, even when labelled as “disastrous” by the PM.

    That sort of cuts out quite a few options doesn’t it.

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  3. Caleb (479 comments) says:

    do they published the various sectors where these jobs are made and lost or if workers are new entrants?

    im sure the socialists will want government to borrow, then spend, to create jobs.

    Goodluck….

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  4. Pongo (372 comments) says:

    I think they need to have a look at Bollard and his recent actions. Not sure what he is trying to get on top of but its pretty tough out there at the moment and has been for several years now so I cant see why he wont give us some relief.

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  5. toad (3,674 comments) says:

    …yes even those put out by the 2025 taskforce

    FFS, DPF, it is those sort of policies that put us in the shit in the first place when Douglas and Richardson were managing the economy. Over a decade of low growth, high unemployment, and static or diminishing real wages. That’s when the much discussed wage gap with Australia really blew out. Do you really want to go back to that?

    The recovery is not robust, and the Greens were correct in predicting it never would be – the issues underlying everything that is going on are the increased cost of extracting a diminishing hydrocarbon resource and the failure to properly regulate the finance industry. But the neo-liberal economic response advocated by National and Labour will just make things worse, rather than better. Just as it did 20-odd years ago.

    Heads in the sand!

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  6. Inky_the_Red (759 comments) says:

    but why no jobs, we got that wonderful cycleway

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  7. ch123 (647 comments) says:

    I see Pita Sharples moaning about the poor Maori in the Far North and East Cape. All I have to say is if you live where there are no jobs, how can you expect to get employment? This goes for anyone (Maori, Pakeha, Asian, whatever) living in a small town where there aren’t any jobs. You can live in a small town and moan all you like, but if you do actually want work then you need to be prepared to move.

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  8. Redbaiter (13,197 comments) says:

    “but why no jobs, we got that wonderful cycleway”

    Really a silly leftist type initiative and one that any National Party true to its founding principles shouldn’t have had a bar of.

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  9. freedom101 (504 comments) says:

    Toad, unless you have some clever ideas, the inconvenient truth is that unless we can make things that people want, and sell them internationally, we won’t be able to afford all the things that people like to use, like cell phones, computers, cars etc. Policies that tax and waste, and shuffle wealth through an expensive bureaucracy simply make us poor. You might pause to think about where we would be now if the policies in place in 1984 had never been changed. I think we would be down there with Haiti by now.

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  10. toad (3,674 comments) says:

    @Guy Fawkes 5:38 pm

    They could sell Kiwirail at a profit, couldn’t they.

    Oh, and here we go. The “solution” is to sell something else off. That worked a treat in the ’80s and ’90s, didn’t it?

    Going down that path, Guy, WTF do you do when there is nothing left to sell off?

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  11. ch123 (647 comments) says:

    So what’s the solution Toad? It’s all very well to moan about what has (or hasn’t been done) but what’s your magical solution? All too often we seeing greenies moaning and complaining but never actually offering any solutions.

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  12. Lazybum (259 comments) says:

    nO INCREASE IN JOBS BC THE GOVT LISTEN TO gREEN fUCKWITS AGAINST job creation in mining.

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  13. Caleb (479 comments) says:

    Exactly Toad.

    No Mining. No Selling SOE. We will end up with nothing left because the governments will spend and grow..

    We need to change.

    No Welfare, Less Government, Less Tax!

    More productivy and personal responsibility.

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  14. Viking2 (11,471 comments) says:

    About time the Nats. got a kick in the BUM.
    All the idea’s, all the energy devoted by others and we are still left with a go slow, mindless meander through time.
    They came to power with nothing in the bag, have bagged to real options and are rapidly dragging everyone down with them.

    As Sir roger has shown so many times we could get back up there without causing pain and misery if they just had the fortitude to listen and adopt some of his ideas’. He and Brash should be put in English’s place.
    There is no other way but to do some thing different. Its the old story isn’t it.
    Keep on doing what you have always done and we will keep on getting the same results.

    Time for admitting they don’t have what it takes and moving over in the drivers seat and let those capable to get the job done.

    Its interesting to note that DPF has been busy on holiday running and interpreting polls. National Party ones as well I suspect.
    More effort on doing the right thing instead of worrying about what the possible voters think right now would be a good thing to do.

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  15. Rex Widerstrom (5,354 comments) says:

    Oh how I yearn for politics of vision. Any vision – even one to which I’m diametrically opposed. The Australian federal election campaign is all about Julia Gillard being a single childless atheist and Tony Abbott being a married Christian father.

    Hell I don’t care if they practice voodoo and polygamy if only one of them would break out of the Crosby Textor / Hawker Britton straightjacket and say something interesting.

    Gillard is a closeted far-left unionist who used to speak her mind and Abbott did actually outline some vision in his book “Battlelines” so I’m hoping one of them will run amok and say something unscripted.

    But Key and Goff? It doesn’t seem that they’re being held back… it’s that they have nothing to say.

    And so the ship of state bobs along, rising and falling on the tides of unemployment, the balalnce of payments, interest rates and the like, seeing where they’ll take us rather than charting a course. While we don’t want a Muldoon (or a Clark) at the helm, determined on full steam ahead in their chosen direction even when the passengers are screaming to be let off, it’d be nice to know the Captain at least had a chart.

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  16. Inky_the_Red (759 comments) says:

    Kiwirail will never make a profit as long as motorist and tax payer keep subsidising the road freight industry

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  17. Viking2 (11,471 comments) says:

    Oh Rex, you have hit the nail on the Head.
    Politics used to be for passionate people. Not anymore, its about money and power and all those things.
    Actually i tried my best to warn people that the Nats. would never make any difference as they are born to rule plodders but unfortunately too many were sick of Helen and didn’t want her or Peters back. Still we got more of the same but worse.
    ah well.
    Now here is a statement that is factually and accurately correct.

    Green Party Co-Leader Metiria Turei says at the same time unemployment’s risen to 6.8 percent the Government’s moving to force people off benefits and on to non-existent jobs.
    Did it last time they were there. All Mouth and Trousers Richardson did the same but worse when she cut the dole $20. Put hundreds of businesses out of business.
    Took over 5 years for many others to recover.
    No intellectual capacity among the Nats.
    Horses Frightened and all that.

    Next time you should all Party Vote ACT.

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  18. ch123 (647 comments) says:

    > But Key and Goff? It doesn’t seem that they’re being held back… it’s that they have nothing to say.

    Oh but Goff has plenty to say… at how the government is doing nothing to make the economy better, create jobs, blah blah blah (and never saying how he would magically fix the situation). He seems to forget that a) the government is not really doing anything at all and b) it’s not doing anything particularly different from how the last Labour government did.

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  19. side show bob (3,660 comments) says:

    I’m with Rex, where’s the vision ?????. Just more fucking socialism on the hoof. The country is still going down the shit hole, it’s just the speed of the descent that has slowed. Of course the recession is still very much with us despite all the pontificating fools in the media who claim it’s full steam ahead for the economy. I wonder when it will dawn on the clowns in power the people voted for change not Liarbore version 2.0

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  20. flipper (4,067 comments) says:

    Can we keep this in perspective?
    Is it not more in Australia?
    It is 9.8% (or thereabouts) in Obama’s economic paradise and much, much more in the trendy socialist nivarna of Europe.
    Of course “zip” would be nice, but that is not going to happen, ever. Makes Bollard look like a twit.
    Bring back Friedman.

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  21. kyotolaw (52 comments) says:

    Why do we only get quarterly statistics on unemployment? Most countries have monthly releases and a weekly update on new unemployment claims…

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  22. Viking2 (11,471 comments) says:

    And they get much better wages and more of them retire wealthy and more of them retire earlier.
    Stop making excuses for the lousy performance of this Govt.
    Shove a rocket up em!

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  23. Doug (410 comments) says:

    The Maori Party is upset at the Maori unemployment Stats. Hone has been doing his best for Maori unemployment by calling out white motherfuckers. Now who would be the major employer’s that’s right white Motherfuckers.

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  24. Positan (390 comments) says:

    What about the 16.4% increase in Maori unemployment – more than double the non-Maori figure of 6.8%? Could it be in any way related to all the Kohanga reo/tikanga Maori emphasis on Maori education – so insisted upon as necessary for Maori “identity?”

    It’d seem patently obvious: (1) that Maori and non-Maori employer demands for such skills are substantially lower than predicated; (2) that employers of both races demand greater competence in the 3Rs by Maori applicants than anything availed by taha Maori; and (3) that Maori students who wish pursue tikanga studies should be made aware of such studies’ limitations up front, so that they may then pursue them only if they so wish for other than job-related reasons.

    Yet again, posturing Maori leaders with far more baseless enthusiasm than informed judgement have led their charges away from proven paths. Just like another baseless Waitangi settlement, mainly non-Maori taxpayers will get to pick up the bill.

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  25. Rex Widerstrom (5,354 comments) says:

    side show bob suggests:

    the people voted for change not Liarbore version 2.0

    While National laid out some sort of direction prior to the last election it wasn’t exactly inspiring, visionary stuff. Nor did it have a lot of detail. Fair enough, because I think most people (other than rusted-on supporters of one or another party) voted for “not Helen” rather than something positive. So that doesn’t give National much of a mandate… I think they have a mandate to do more than they’re doing, but not one for significant change.

    But that’s what you use a first term for. You’re the PM ferchrissakes. Open a chip packet and the media will turn up to see if you prefer salt and vinegar to barbecue. You have the pulpit, you have the purse strings… be brave, preach change, explain why it’s needed and seek a mandate for it. Open up genuine debates (not focus groups) on the things that matter and seek the widest possible input. Show you’ve genuinely considered it all and then market your conclusions as your policies for the next term… all the while doing as much as you feel you have a mandate to do this term.

    Have belief, and know on what basis those beliefs are founded. Be prepared to change them if the underlying facts change but not just because your pollsters tell you to. Accept that some people may be wrorse off because of necessary policy decisions. Have the courage to admit that and to face them and to explain why their sacrifice is necessary… you might be surprised to find that at least some of them end up supporting you.

    And if you lose, but you lose with your opponents grudgingly admiring your willingness to stand by policy and principle, then you’ve done your duty to Parliament and the people.

    Though I’m not a great fan of political parties per se, I’ll admit they have a place… but only if they reverted to what they were, elegantly described by Edmund Burke as a body of people “united in promoting by their joint endeavour the national interest upon some particular principle on which they are all agreed”.

    On what principles do National’s MPs agree? And I’m not talking about Nikki Kaye endlessly parrotting “equality of opportunity not equality of outcome” like a beauty contestant talking world peace, I’m talking about real principles. Why do they feel these principles are “in the national interest”? What “joint endeavours” do they propose to advance those interests?

    If they can’t answer those questions, then we never will.

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  26. Viking2 (11,471 comments) says:

    AND THEY NEVER WILL, NO MATTER HOW MANY TIMES YOU ASK.

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  27. JiveKitty (778 comments) says:

    Pongo: “I think they need to have a look at Bollard and his recent actions.”

    The governor of the RBNZ? His job is inflation targeting. That is all. He has NO accountability for employment statistics and nor should he. Unless they did change the law to muddy up what the RBNZ actually does – which would be an exceptionally stupid move – as was suggested a while back (by Labour?), but I don’t recall them doing so.

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  28. Doug (410 comments) says:

    If Labour keeps going the way they are the unemployment rate will rise sharply next year.

    http://www.3news.co.nz/Video/Politics/tabid/370/Default.aspx

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  29. kaya (1,360 comments) says:

    Globalisation is a major contributor to our unemployment. How many jobs go overseas because of cheaper labour costs? That’s an observation, not a criticism. The future isn’t looking flash for any of the Western economies. Wellington is relatively insulated from the real world.
    Oh and to the person who quoted the US unemployment statistics at 9.8% – dream on. The true figure is closer to 17%.

    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/economy-watch/2009/05/actual_us_unemployment_158.html

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  30. Pete George (23,567 comments) says:

    I’m still prepared to cut National some slack. Campaigning to win their way into parliament, finding their feet after so long out of power, and dealing with the financial situation are fair enough factors. But if they don’t come up with a bold visionary plan ready for the next election they’ll have used up all their slack.

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  31. JC (956 comments) says:

    Jeez, just one bad metric and the wailing starts.

    Lets have a look at Aussie v NZ employment. For June 10 the Oz labour participation rate is 65.1%, for NZ its 68.1% and falling. Thats the result of WFF which made it attractive for poor or unskilled labour to join the workforce. Once the recession hit employers started to shed this labour.. but, they are employing more older people and working their current staffs harder, so productivity is building from more hours worked and poorer labour down the road.

    I’d pick we get more unemployment as business owners struggle to pay their business and personal loans on the back of rising interest rates.. and from the look of the still very high labour participation rate there’s still some labour fat there.

    JC

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  32. jackp (668 comments) says:

    Toads version of employment are bureaucratic jobs which is why he is blaming the government for high unemployment. He wants the government to hire more bureaucrats so they can purchase 65000.00 lunches and dinners on the taxpayers. He lacks the intelligence about supply and demand and hiring a competent work force. The go getters left New Zealand, about 250,000 which is a huge amount! What do we have left, unskilled labour and tough labour laws. National got it right when they want to change the employment laws to make it more equal and easier to hire people but Toad is out there to stop this. Toad, people like you are dead weight in this whole thing because you offer no constructive advice how to stimulate the economy. You are only there to break down police barriers with Sue Bradford, gosh, talk about a waste of taxpayer’s money.

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  33. Gooner (995 comments) says:

    Which smart person said this about the refusal of the Nats to back Sir Roger’s youth rates bill in March, and who here thinks there is a link between the refusal and youth Maori unemployment now going through the roof?

    It really brings into doubt the seriousness of the Government in terms of job creation, when it persists with a law that has clearly priced many teenagers off the job market. …

    Most teenagers are not seeking full-time employment. What they desperately want is to gain some work experience, and to gain some extra money on top of whatever parental or student support they have.

    By agreeing to vote down Sir Roger’s bill, the Government is saying we want young people to be unable to gain work, unless an employer thinks they are worth almost $13 an hour. …

    Later this year, overall unemployment should start tracking down. If youth unemployment remains persistently high, the Government will have no one to blame but themselves.

    There are 45,000 teenagers unemployed. This decision is a very bad one.

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  34. Gooner (995 comments) says:

    @ Pete George

    But if they don’t come up with a bold visionary plan ready for the next election…

    There’s a bold visionary plan already in place Pete. The only issue is that the Gnats are too scared to implement it.

    http://www.act.org.nz/plan

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  35. JiveKitty (778 comments) says:

    Most of that is a wishlist. It’s not a plan, even when you get down to the policy detail (at least the policy detail I looked at). Also, they may still be economically liberal, but they seem to have stopped caring about being socially liberal in the classical sense – if they ever were.

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  36. Hurf Durf (2,860 comments) says:

    Ctrl+F

    “Green New Deal”

    Phrase not found

    You disappoint me, Frogboy.

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  37. John Ansell (874 comments) says:

    Good one David: if all else fails, do something that allows you to achieve your goal. No chance of the Nats doing that though.

    Rex Widerstrom: good post.

    JiveKitty: of course the ACT 20 Point Plan is a plan. It’s not a detailed project plan, but who wants that in an election manifesto? It spells out the things we need to do to close the Tasman Wage Gap, and few disagree that if followed, it would close it.

    What’s extraordinary is that (correct me if I’m wrong) it’s the only serious attempt to plan our way from stagnation to prosperity ever attempted by any New Zealand political party.

    Can anyone remember another one?

    It supports my view that Roger Douglas is the only politician in living memory who has shown himself capable of seeing the big picture and charting a workable course to a properous future.

    And for this invaluable perspective, Comrade Key ruled him out of Cabinet.

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  38. Clint Heine (1,571 comments) says:

    Of course if you privatise you’ll see some job losses. A business is supposed to make their purchase worth the money they paid for it. If they purchase something that is losing money, with an overinflated workforce, why would they keep it the same when it’s broken?

    The people who bought Telecom, the BNZ etc in the 80’s-90’s did a damn fine job making them more efficient. I look forward to a Government who will sell TVNZ, Kiwipost and NZ Rail again and do it properly so we don’t get Labour or any “well intentioned” lefties buying them back, ripping off the taxpayers in the process.

    Unfortunately we have a Government that opposes bulk funding and decided to cuddle up to the unions so there is no hope in that.

    Hear Hear John Ansell.

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  39. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Nothing to worry about. Key’ visionary cycleway inititiave will create thousands of jobs in a not so distant future.
    Let’s do not lose faith in our brave Neville.

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  40. Pete George (23,567 comments) says:

    Fair enough dig Manolo, but where are all the potential jobs?

    Our agricultural efficiency means low job levels.
    Processing timber? Does anyone want processed timber?
    A few mines might make a small difference.
    Tourism is quite developed (job-wise) – not much scope for a lot of job growth there.

    How would Act’s plan generate substantially more jobs? In what sectors?

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  41. TMC (75 comments) says:

    “..the Govt becomes far more vulnerable to opposition attacks…”

    I read the article about Labour and the Greens attacking the government over the statistic. However, nowhere in the article did it say or even question what they would do about it. What are their plans? All it had was Goff saying National was on the wrong path. Ok Skippy, what would you do about it? Isn’t there one decent journalist in this frickin’ country who could ask that simple question of them?

    And if you’re opposition, wouldn’t you be using this to present your plan or as mentioned your vision, or is it just time to bitch and complain? I suppose maybe I’m asking too much.

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  42. Pete George (23,567 comments) says:

    Alternative Labour and Green plans and visions are irrelevant probably for at least four years, it’s a waste of taxpayer resources for them to spend all their time trying to spoil and diminish government effectiveness. What we should be hearing from Labour and Greens now is what they will do now to help govern the country.

    I don’t want to elect people who will stuff around trying to disrupt government until it’s their turn to rule the benches. That’s a huge waste of resources.

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  43. Jibbering Gibbon (198 comments) says:

    It certainly is amusing that National will support Labour policy – a party they oppose – for results which perpetuate a downward descent, but not Act policy – a party they’re in coalition with – which would support an increase in jobs and growth.

    Are they blind or blinkered? There are 4 things Act support that National could do right now and frighten the people less than the 90 day bill:

    (in this order)

    Local govt – limit to core activities

    Tax – cut and flatten

    Red tape/resource management – reduce and amend for constructive outcomes

    ACC – create competitive market

    At present we have National giving tax cuts with one hand and then taking them back with the other – net change, nil to worse. It’s clear you can’t tax for luxury ideals and have low employment rates/high growth.

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  44. ch123 (647 comments) says:

    When you’re in opposition all you need to do is bitch and complain. Not that they have any idea of what to do themselves, but if they did, they’re not going to tell us otherwise the ruling party might take their plan and implement it themselves. This is the problem with party politics: it’s all about the winning and getting in power, and not actually about the greater good.

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  45. jackp (668 comments) says:

    Good point Pete George. Companies like Fisher and Pykle are leaving because it is cheaper to manufacturer goods abroad. New Zealand has done nothing to keep these companies here, especially these last 10 years with labour at the helm. Not only did the manufacturers leave but the workers as well. There are 2 things the government can do to stop this… less company tax and lower
    the amount of bureaucrats in government. It was pointed out in the news last night that civil servants are abusing their expense accounts… that’s not good when the government is borrowing money to pay the civil servants. It’s a vicoious cycle which the taxpayers are content to be a part of. Act could shave off 8 billion of the government’s 65 billion price tag tomorrow without having to raise gst. Also, there should be an incentive for beneficiaries to get back to work… do not tax until about the 15 or 20 thousand a year area. This might be an incentive.

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  46. Pete George (23,567 comments) says:

    But it needn’t be like that ch123, if enough public opinion makes it clear that once elected into parliament the greater good must be the first priority.

    The biggest problem with this is the media – they thrive on and even stoke conflict and disagreement. They reward stupidity with publicity, nurturing their source of infotainment.

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  47. Jibbering Gibbon (198 comments) says:

    Also, there should be an incentive for beneficiaries to get back to work… do not tax until about the 15 or 20 thousand a year area. This might be an incentive.

    And here is the kicker. Taxing people what they can afford is completely a leftist ideal. The problem with Left wing politics is that it needs poverty to have something to throw at the rich as proof of their moral decadence. If the Left helped people up using the theoretical goals of their ideology, the party would rapidly cease to exist in it’s simplest form because there would be no more “poor”. It pays to keep the poor down if you want a career in leftist politics. Every party that passes over this cannot claim to have the greater good in mind. Including Act – who make that very claim.

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  48. ch123 (647 comments) says:

    You are absolutely right about the media Pete, and I think they’ve made the whole adversarial aspect of politics worse in recent years.

    The thing that annoys me the most with party politics though, is that National will implement some stuff now. Then when Labour has their turn in a few years time they’ll simply reverse some of the things their ideology does not agree with. Then National will have their turn and do the same. And so on and so forth.

    I just wish they could actually work together to try to do something more long term that they all can agree with, instead of focussing so much on winning power. I know there would have to be compromise and maybe not the best solution would be reached, but at least we wouldn’t have the country moving left then right every few years.

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  49. Maggie (672 comments) says:

    Perhaps Tariana and Pita should ask some of their supporters: “Which would you prefer, repeal of the Seabed and Foreshore Act, or a job?”

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  50. Rex Widerstrom (5,354 comments) says:

    John Ansell:

    Thanks. However, where you say:

    What’s extraordinary is that (correct me if I’m wrong) it’s the only serious attempt to plan our way from stagnation to prosperity ever attempted by any New Zealand political party.

    Can anyone remember another one?

    I used to have (but lost in moving, damnit) a handsome collection of manifestos from all sorts of parties. They were quite thick documents, with tables and graphs. In fact I seem to recall them being akin to the “executive summary” version of the budget. I remember having one put out by the Values Party which, despite having very limited resources compared to National and Labour, knew that any party, if it was to be taken seriously, needed a plan and a set of figures and projections to back it up.

    So you’re right, insofar as the last 20 years or so go. But let’s not forget it used to be the norm. Let’s make it so again. Let’s laugh off the hustings any candidate who can’t put on the table next to the tea urn a solid document, not a glossy brochure, oulining his or her party’s plan, and the basis for that plan… and the measurements of its success or failure.

    It supports my view that Roger Douglas is the only politician in living memory who has shown himself capable of seeing the big picture and charting a workable course to a properous future.

    You’re right there. Or at least if anyone else has, they’ve been hiding their light under a bushel. It seems to be a trait in NZ… not wanting to look “too smart”. Mark Latham wrote books, and writes for the AFR. Kevin Rudd penned a lengthy essay on the role of Christianity in politics, citing Bonhoeffer. Abbott has written “Battlelines”… But in NZ Douglas is the last politician I recall writing a book on what he believed and why.

    Some PMs and would-be PMs clearly wouldn’t have had the capacity (a book by Jim Bolger?!) but others seem positively terrified of being seen as a smarty-pants. But that, I think, is because their pollsters tell them people want a follower, not a leader. Agree or disagree with Douglas (and I manage to simultaneously do both), you’re right – he is the only current MP to clearly and bravely enunciate a comprehensive vision.

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  51. mpledger (425 comments) says:

    I said last quarter that the umemployment rate was artificially low because the first quarter enjoyed balmy weather well into March.

    Three houses in our neighbourhood had householders start repaining them – in March, in Wellington – that’s got to tell you that the weather is different than usual. Usually people start in December and race to finish over the summer break.

    It pretty much turned instantly freezing in April and hardily ever stopped raining so all outside work pretty much ground to a halt.

    (And it’s probably not a coincidence that the employment rate went down when the universities were taking anyone and the rate has gone up now that several universities are not taking any more enrollments.)

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  52. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    I firmly believe this National Party goverment is made up of a pack of cowards completely bereft of ideas.

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