Rudman on electoral fraud

September 13th, 2010 at 10:22 am by David Farrar

Brian Rudman writes:

Just as you think the Super City elections can’t get any duller, two of the mayoral candidates engage in a shadow cock fight on a stage on the North Shore, then it’s revealed that 87 Indian-sounding voters are registered at two modest-sized Papatoetoe homes.

For all four candidates it’s a potential calamity. Unless those behind this apparent manipulation of the democratic process are unmasked before voting papers go out, a shadow of suspicion hangs over all four.

I agree, those behind this must be unmasked. If the Police talk to the 87 enrollees, I am sure a number of them will confirm who told them to register at that address, and why.

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7 Responses to “Rudman on electoral fraud”

  1. Komata (1,191 comments) says:

    Why oh why, oh why is it ALWAYS the Asians or similar ‘ethnic impor’ who go in for these sorts of rorts? In this instance it’s Sikh’s, in other similar ‘scams’ (can’t think of another word that is anywhere near adequate) it’s the Chinese, or the Vietnamese, or the Somali’s, or the Arabs( add ethnic groups as appropriate) who are always very quick with the ‘non comprende” response when they are caught.

    Perhaps one of their apologists on this ‘Blog can explain . . .

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  2. backster (2,172 comments) says:

    I would think a strikingly attractive Indian woman may be able to help the Police with their enquiries.

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  3. Swiftman the infidel (329 comments) says:

    Oh dear. Just two minutes here in NZ and already they are up to the corrupt practices from their old cuntry.

    Better when they were under British rule.

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  4. All_on_Red (1,583 comments) says:

    You can take the boy out of India but can you take India out of the boy?

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/7987069/Third-of-Indians-utterly-corrupt-says-watchdog.html

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  5. ZenTiger (435 comments) says:

    87 people enrolled at two addresses? That’s just not cricket.

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  6. petal (706 comments) says:

    I used to be proud not to be a racist. Every new person I met would be given a clean slate.

    After NZ’s immigration policies were relaxed, and we accepted large numbers of non-Caucasian immigrants, I got ripped off, shat on, stolen from and otherwise cheated by immigrant people* in much higher proportions than before.

    After a while a pattern started to emerge. Certain ethnicities had their own unique associated risks.

    Now, I pre-judge the likelihood of being treated poorly by the ethnicity of a person I meet, and I approach them differently because of it. In business, I will quote them more by means of insurance, I will throw more lawyers at the contracts by means of protection, and I will insist on payment in advance by means of getting to see any money at all.

    Isn’t pre-judging someone by their ethnicity racism?

    I’m a racist now.

    Don’t like the idea, but to me it is a form of self defense.

    The really sad thing is that I have lost any desire to meet new people of some ethnicities – I can rationalise they aren’t all bad, but why take the risk?

    I don’t know. Is a world without racism simply an idealistic concept?

    —–
    *) I’m one too.

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  7. slightlyrighty (2,475 comments) says:

    Where I work we deal with a number of ethnicities, and negotiate with them on a consistant basis. In discussions with my colleagues, and others in the same industry, we all agree than those from the subcontintent are without a doubt the most difficult to deal with.

    Our worst horror stories, involving blatent dishonesty, have always been with Indian customers. One incident ended up with the client taking us to fair go. I would have preferred he take us to the small claims court, where we would have got a fair hearing.

    Don’t get me wrong. We are happy to do business with that group, and they make up a high number of our staff, many of whom I count as friends, but they also make up a high percentage of our client “challenges”.

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