Temporary wives

December 2nd, 2010 at 7:39 am by David Farrar

AP reports:

Contracts with “temporary wives” are a legal way for Iranian men to have mistresses outside marriage, with the agreements lasting several hours to a few years.

Hmmn, maybe there is something to this sharia law after all :-)

Does this mean the mother-in-laws are just temporary also?

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33 Responses to “Temporary wives”

  1. metcalph (1,396 comments) says:

    It’s not a Sharia law but rather a Shi’ite practice.

    And simply having a temporary wife doesn’t make the permanent wife any happier when she finds out.

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  2. dad4justice (7,898 comments) says:

    Do they have a deceitful gravy train Feminazi Family Court and a extortion child support racket in place in Iran?

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  3. andrei (2,529 comments) says:

    The story is about the hanging of the temporary wife for allegedly murdering the permanent wife.

    There is nothing to take from this but the repellent nature of Iranian society.

    [DPF: A number of countries hang people for murder.]

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  4. BlairM (2,303 comments) says:

    Hmmmm temporary wives… yeah I had one of those. I think I’d rather have a permanent FWB, on balance.

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  5. Dave Mann (1,184 comments) says:

    With respect, Andrei, although many aspects of Iranian society are pretty repellent and barbaric, in this case it is not necessarily so. If you stab somebody to death then it might be argued that you deserve to die. Simple. Just because Iran is a muslim state it doesn’t mean that everything that happens there is automatically wrong. Under their law they quite rightly take a rather dim view of murderers and deal with them accordingly.

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  6. CJPhoto (218 comments) says:

    A contract for a temporary wife is just another name for a contract with a Hooker isn’t it.

    I have heard of tax avoidance but maybe they need ‘religion avoidance’ clauses in the Koran

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  7. Dave Mann (1,184 comments) says:

    Yes CJphoto…… I agree, it does sound a lot like a polite way of saying ‘hooker’ doesn’t it?

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  8. Pete George (23,167 comments) says:

    The story is about the hanging of the temporary wife for allegedly murdering the permanent wife.

    There is nothing to take from this but the repellent nature of Iranian society.

    Comparable to the repellent nature of some US states? The repellent nature of NZ and the UK up until fifty years ago? Many societies for a very long time have killed people as punishment for them killing others. Are religions other than Islam that have supported death sentences repellent?

    The temporary wife thing is just another example of the power of men and money overruling inconvenient moral and religious ideas.

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  9. BlairM (2,303 comments) says:

    There’s nothing repellent about killing murderers. In fact, they do it so humanely in the US these days it’s ridiculous. I’d love to die the way these people die – it’s probably less painful than getting pneumonia when you’re 90.

    No, the only problem with capital punishment is that a) there’s always the possibility of killing someone who’s innocent, and then you can’t set them free after; b) it costs the State so much in terms of appeals and legal rigmarole; and c) it’s too nice. I’d rather someone had to rot in a cell for the rest of their lives and live with what they had done.

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  10. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    This is practiced widely within islamic countries..nothing new..many of the temporary ”wives” are children , the daughters of very poor people..many of the ”men” are wealthy arabs etc..just more of the never ending hypocrisy…
    Dave..they are very selective in the ”murders” they take a dim view of…girls and women supposedly breaking the intolerable rules imposed upon them , can be chopped up , shot, hung , raped without any consequence to the murderer or murderers as it is ofter a family affair..As I said , just more hypocrisy. Nowadays , the Afghan women are self immolating..they prefer this horrible end to life with these ..”men.”

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  11. wreck1080 (3,787 comments) says:

    @andrei:

    So are you saying that Graham Burton does not deserve the death penalty?

    I believe in the death penalty, for the most heinous crimes where a conviction is based on irrefutable evidence (ie, beyond doubt).

    Graham Burton, Clayton Weatherspoon (sic?) would qualify for the death penalty. There is no chance that their convictions were wrong.

    David Bain, Scott Watson, David Tamihere whose crimes while heinous, would not qualify because their convictions are based on circumstantial evidence. It is always possible that they may be subsequently found innocent (such as in Bains case).

    Iran has it right in this case, assuming the facts are true.

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  12. Dave Mann (1,184 comments) says:

    @joanna…. (yawn)… It was probably all the guy’s fault then. It always is, isn’t it? Geez men are bastards … …

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  13. Rick Rowling (823 comments) says:

    pedantry

    *mothers-in-law

    /pedantry

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  14. kowtow (7,873 comments) says:

    While I am in favour of capital punishment ,having read the article, this hanging seems particularly brutal. A chair was pulled from under the offender by the victims son. That means a slow death by strangulation,which is not the western method ,which is a drop thru a trap door that breaks the neck and is supposedly swift.

    I would expect nothing less from the brutal Islamic regime that currently oppresses the Iranian people.

    I would be hesitant to make merry about the circumstances of this case ,particularly if I were an outspoken advocate for so called womens rights,which I’m not.

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  15. YesWeDid (1,041 comments) says:

    It’s simply not the role of the state to kill it’s people, in fact it is the role of the state to protect it’s people.

    And no justice system can ever be 100% right in every case so there is every chance an innocent person would be executed.

    I have no issue with keeping the very worst offenders locked up for the rest of their lives.

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  16. Pete George (23,167 comments) says:

    Kowtow, I don’t agree with what happened in this case, but our society keeps people alive in worse circumstances than that, often for extended periods.

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  17. Fletch (6,107 comments) says:

    The practice is called Mut’a, or Mutah and basically is prostitution.

    This year, the Iranian interior ministry has launched a huge campaign to encourage the country’s frustrated youth to seek sexual fulfilment in muta marriages

    A temporary marriage, known generally as muta, is a specifically Shia tradition. It involves a contract between a man, who may or may not be married, and an unmarried woman – a contract in which the duration of marriage and the dowry are specified in advance. Both sides agree by mutual consent to the length of the marriage, which can range from an hour to 99 years.

    There is no divorce; the muta contract simply expires with the lapse of its duration. Although witnesses are not required, the marriage has to be registered in court. Unlike in an ordinary, permanent marriage (how many really are permanent?), a temporary wife cannot claim maintenance. But a temporary husband cannot disown the children born from a muta marriage. Children of temporary marriages are considered legitimate, and are entitled to equal status in inheritance and other rights with their half- siblings born of permanent marriages.

    This type of marriage existed in the time of the Prophet Muhammad, but it was banned by Umar, the second caliph, and later abandoned by most schools of Islamic law. However, “Twel ver” Shias, who predominate in Iran and Iraq, disagree with the rest of the Muslim world. They argue that it is not only a legitimate institution sanctioned by Islamic law, but essential for a society’s sexual health. Since the “Islamic Revolution” of 1979, the Iranian regime has promoted muta vigorously, extolling its virtues in mosques and schools, at religious gatherings, in news papers and on radio and television.

    From the New Statesman – link

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  18. Neil (569 comments) says:

    Having been in Iran four years ago I can say that Iran is one of the most “double standards” countries I have ever been to in my 50 country world travels.
    Prostitution is illegal in Iran, however temporary marriage overcomes that snag in a typically Muslim way. The Iranians explain it away in such an appealing way.
    As for religion, I have never seen such a wafer thin religious nation on earth. I thought Iran would be scraping and bowing to the call every hour. I found Egypt far more pervasive in its Islamic traditions.
    Alcohol is a big laugh with Iranians keen to travel overseas for sex and alcohol. Apparently the Iranians love to go overseas to partake in alcohol consumption.
    Iranians are lovely people but I’m afraid I would be very sceptical of their deeper feelings. After all, the favourite TV programme when I was there was “Bay Watch” received on Turkish TV. A bit different to Iranian TV with its Koran readings from whiskery Islamists all afternoon.

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  19. Fletch (6,107 comments) says:

    It can all go horribly pear shaped –

    Iran on Wednesday hanged a former soccer player’s mistress _ known as a “temporary wife _ who was convicted of murdering her love rival, the player’s wife, the official IRNA news agency reported. Shahla Jahed was hanged at dawn, after spending more than eight years in jail, IRNA said, in a case that has captivated the Iranian public for several years.
    Jahed had become what is known as a “temporary wife” of former soccer star Nasser Mohammad Khani.

    She was charged in 2002 with stabbing to death Laleh Saharkhizan, the player’s wife, and convicted of murder in 2004 and again in 2009, after her appeal was denied.

    Contracts with “temporary wives” are a legal way for Iranian men to have mistresses outside marriage, with the agreements lasting from between several hours to a few years.

    Wednesday’s death sentence was based on the Islamic law of “qisas” _ or eye for an eye retribution.

    International human rights groups, including Amnesty International, had campaigned for Jahed’s punishment to be halted. The IRNA report said that just before the hanging at Tehran’s Evin prison, the 40-year-old Jahed prayed peacefully, then burst into tears and cries, shouting for her life to be spared. The victim’s son pulled the chair from under her feet as Jahed gasped for breath in the remaining moments of her life, the khabaronline.ir news website said. The former soccer striker, Khani, also attended the hanging… more

    Of course, the men get off scott free. Nothing ever happens to them.

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  20. Rick Rowling (823 comments) says:

    God sets the rules that we must live by.

    Fortunately, He’s okay about loopholes, so long as the letter of the law is followed.

    Temporary wives
    “non-interest” loans
    Thou shalt not kill, except in a “just war” or a “holy war”
    Indulgences

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  21. Brian Smaller (4,017 comments) says:

    Don’t forget the forced ‘temporary marriage’ so guards can rape the shit out of women who are political and religious prisoners.

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  22. Sarkozygroupie (197 comments) says:

    Is there a law against temporary husbands? It’s all very one sided, in my view. You guys have all the fun.

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  23. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    Good point Brian.
    Though I am sure the ongoing wholesale rape of the Iranian freedom youth both male and female is planned around temporary marriages. But then again maybe they do do that with a local Imam.
    Thinking on it, it wouldn’t surprise me if that is what happened, though they’d have a problem with boys I would have thought.

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  24. MikeNZ (3,234 comments) says:

    Rick Rowling (146) Says:
    December 2nd, 2010 at 11:27 am

    Haha don’t bet on it Rick.

    If there is a God and he is Just, I suspect there are a whole lot of people who are in for a little surprise on the last day.
    many of them from issues they’ve long forgot.

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  25. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    Dave…which islamic country have you lived in? How many islamic countries have you lived in /visited?…
    Neil ..all islamic countiries are riddled with double standards..islam it self is one big double standard..it is not a religion..It is a male ,Arab supremacist cult where women and girls are abused , raped and murdered on a daily basis.. The men go overseas to drink alcohol if they are not drinking it at home , find temporary slaves etc..they often change out of their ”gear” on the plane then start ordering their booze…hypocrites one and all.

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  26. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    Also Neil, Iranians consider themselves to be Persians..islam was imposed on them in the usual manner..privately many stick to an old Persian religion..the brand of islam followed there is different from that of some neighbouring countries..This is one reason why they are not so popular with some of their neighbours..muslims are always killing other muslims..can’t seem to cope with other holding different views. There is a big problem with heroin addiction amongst the young..the wealthy and ambitious try to get out of the country.
    Wahabbism , the really extreme islam comes from Saudi Arabia..in Egypt you have the history of the Muslim Brotherhood..also extremists who successive govts have tried to keep in jail.

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  27. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    There is NO problem with boys MikeNZ..just think the dancing boys of Afghanistan , the poor boys lined up outside the police stations everynight…the Paki and Indian truck drivers , the sultans of SEA…etc etc..it is estimated that 40 per cent of muslim men are bisexual.
    Segregated societies like Saudi contribute to this because each sex spend so much time with their own kind..women are locked inside etc..It is just more of the double standards Neil mentioned.

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  28. Sarkozygroupie (197 comments) says:

    That about sums up my experience of Iran. I was stalked by one Iranian man for two weeks. He tried to burst through my hotel door twice on the first night – demanding I kiss him – and I had to block his entry and slam the door on him. I contended with other Iranian men who tried to get me to take off my chador and head scarf on a regular basis. I had to cover myself completely – I had a special bathrobe with hood – and the hotel staff (all men) would come to my door at any time on some pretty thin pretexts. Room service might be ordered for 7 but could arrive anywhere from 5:30am – trying to catch a wicked western woman in a state of undress. It did not help that I have blonde hair and green eyes.

    The Lebanese soccer team that surrounded me (no seat allocation so free to sit where you want) on the plane to Dubai didn’t stop leering at me the whole time. The player (who chucked out the coach so he could sit next to me) asked if he could touch me after approximately two minutes of chatting me up. When I said ‘no’ he started telling me about his wife and kids back in Tripoli. Having put up with this carry on for two weeks already I was not phased in the slightest by what, in any other words and countries, would be overt and constant sexual harrassment.

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  29. Fletch (6,107 comments) says:

    I remember hearing one story about a woman who wanted to interview some Islamic personage and she was given some time to prepare beforehand so that she could confer with her interpreter. A while later someone came in and was horrified that a woman was alone with a Muslim man (the interpretor) to whom she was not married, so she had to temporarily marry him for the time they interacted.

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  30. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    Sarkosygroupie…they are all class..it really says something when women would rather set themselves alight than live with one of these ”so called” men..
    I recall reading about one part western woman who had got herself married to a Saudi..she was one of the lucky ones who eventually got out…She said the women are so restricted , not allowed to do anything , go anywhere..they just sit around in beautiful expensive outfits serving coffee to other terminally, bored women.

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  31. Sarkozygroupie (197 comments) says:

    Yes joana, I had a friend who lived in Saudi as a teenager. His dad was there as a locum. He said it was incredibly restrictive even for him and after 14 months the family had had enough and left. I’ve never been to Saudi. Dubai is not too bad; the dress code is more relaxed (no chadors necessary) but you still have to be prettychaste in your behaviour at all times. And of course no alcohol unless you know where to get it ;)

    The scariest moment I had was when my passport was taken off me in Tehran, and my colleagues were made to get on the plane. Being a member of the ‘enemy’ faith really didn’t help at the moment as Iranians were very suspicious and I had managed to slip in to the country with this fact undeclared (they didn’t ask my mother’s ethnic group or faith on my 5 page visa application form which provides me with a direct line of descent, only the father’s failth was deemed important).

    Anyway, when the officials that had escorted us to the airport looked at me with some discomfort said they couldn’t help me and walked away leaving me on my own I knew I was helpless (although having met with the Ambassador over there I knew I could count on him). In the end they let me go. I suspect it was to do with politics than anything else. Never have I felt such relief!

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  32. Rex Widerstrom (5,307 comments) says:

    BlairM suggests:

    There’s nothing repellent about killing murderers. In fact, they do it so humanely in the US these days it’s ridiculous. I’d love to die the way these people die – it’s probably less painful than getting pneumonia when you’re 90.

    And we know this because so many executed people have come back from the dead and said “Yeah, that was great… can I go again?” do we?

    I presume you’re talking lethal injection, which consists of a barbituate (a bit like the pre-op stuff they give you that makes you woozy but still awake) then a paralytic that slowly suffocates you, before delivering the coup de grace with something that stops your heart.

    If it were such a happy fairground ride then it’d be the despatch method of choice for those who wish to euthanise themselves. It’s not. A humane method would be a gradually increasing dose of morphine or some related drug that ensured the subject were totally unconscious before their breathing slowed to a stop.

    Of course if you’re so convinced it’s a doddle, Blair, I invite you to write a living will which specifies that you be dispatched the way the Americans do it rather than with morphine.

    Not that the death penalty will ever be justified, if for no other reason than the number of people rescued from death row by Innocence Projects (around 100 last time I checked) who would have been murdered by the state.

    Who should be the odd one out in this list: Belarus, China, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mongolia, North Korea, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Tonga and the United States?

    The US loses all moral authority to criticise regimes like China, North Korea and Iran when it proves almost weekly its moral compass is equally broken. Since the death penalty was reauthorized in 1976 1,210 people have been executed, 22 of them for crimes committed under the age of 18, a third of the total in Texas.

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  33. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    Very well said Rex.
    You are much braver than I am Sarkosygroupie. Blond blue eyed children are ”top dollar” in these countries..amazing how many naive western parents let their children wander about at airports etc I knew a little boy who almost got stolen from an international school…His parents had a lucky escape and unsurprisingly soon packed up and returned to the UK..Babies were regularly ”for sale”..boys fetching far more…how many have heard of baby thighing..?? Mohamads paedo instructions…Truly an evil ideology.

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