Should have happened at the beginning

January 19th, 2011 at 9:26 am by David Farrar

Amy Glass at Stuff reports:

Police heading the operation have agreed to release documents detailing why they decided to abandon their efforts, a lawyer for some of the families says.

Barrister Nicholas Davidson QC said yesterday Police Commissioner Howard Broad had said the information would include reports and the advice police had received from experts and the Mines Rescue Trust.

“For the first time, we will be able to take that material and consult with our experts,” Davidson said.

I am surprised that this is only happening now. In my opinion it would have been far more sensible of the Police to have shared these reports with the families before they made a decision, ask the families for any feedback on the reports and then make a decision. Then at least you would have families being able to understand the rationale for the decision.

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12 Responses to “Should have happened at the beginning”

  1. BeaB (2,164 comments) says:

    Yeah yeah but what if the families had still banged on? The police had to make the decision themselves. I am glad they are making the info available but these decisions are not for the families to make. That’s why we pay officials and experts.
    I think the families have been incredibly well involved but suspect if it weren’t for Bernie Monk and the mayor the families would have accepted there is an inevitability about what is happening.
    We have the coroners report and the commission to come. Let’s not get ahead of ourselves and all try to be judge and jury.

    And who is paying for the QC? Unless he is doing it pro bono (unlikely) then the bill is mounting very quickly.

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  2. MyNameIsJack (2,414 comments) says:

    No, the whole point of management is to manage.

    decisions need to be made n the basis of fact, not emotion. And decisions also need to be made in a timely fashion.

    Nothing can change the fact that 19 are dead, nothing can bring them back, time to get over it and get on.

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  3. adamsmith1922 (724 comments) says:

    Given your prior post why should you be surprised

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  4. Dave Mann (1,246 comments) says:

    Why on earth are the Police in charge of this mine affair? The Police do not have any mining, engineering or industrial expertise and its not a ‘crime scene’ in any conventional sense…. so why is Mr Plod involved?

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  5. Paulus (2,712 comments) says:

    I see Bernie Monk has volunteered to enter the Mine. Will Trevor, Andy and Helen Kelly join him. If so go rescue.

    Monk is being a pillock

    Dave Mann – the laws of this country determine that the police have the sole authority to take charge of such as the mine disaster, and have the right to call upon whomsoever they choose, to advise, and that is what has been done, particularly Australian Mining experts. Your inference that they have not done this belittles you.

    You are a small minded stirrer, but entitled to your opinion, even if misguided.

    In the Brisbane floods the Army have the same right, as you will see, if you look.

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  6. gazzmaniac (2,306 comments) says:

    Dave we have been over why the police are involved and that is because they are New Zealand’s search and rescue specialists.

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  7. Dave Mann (1,246 comments) says:

    No I’m not a small minded stirrer, actually, and yes I am perfectly entitled to as the question as, as far as I know, free speech hasn’t been completely banned in this country yet.

    I am expressing a perfectly rational opinion that as the Police know absolutely nothing about mining OR anything to do with it, they are NOT the ideal body to be in charge of handling a hugely important and catastrophic event such as this disaster.

    The Australian Army handling the Queensland floods is perfectly understandable. The flooding is a (relatively) ongoing event which needs manpower (not ‘person’ power for those of the PC persuasion), the legal authority and ability to intervene if necessary and all the skills which a competent army can bring to bear. Completely different to Pike River.

    The Queensland floods were caused by RAIN….. whereas the Pike River fiasco was possibly caused by some kind of incompetence on somebody’s part. If the government ever gets around to an enquiry we might just find out, but don’t lets hold our breaths.

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  8. Inventory2 (9,384 comments) says:

    @ Dave – you’ve answered your own question with this:

    The Queensland floods were caused by RAIN….. whereas the Pike River fiasco was possibly caused by some kind of incompetence on somebody’s part.

    If there is any issue of negligence, then the issue of criminal liability arises, which, of course, IS an issue for the police. The Pike River mine is essentially a crime scene, even if no crime is ever established to have been committed. That is why the police had held control over it.

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  9. alex Masterley (1,535 comments) says:

    The police are also responsible for gathering evidence for the Coronorial Inquiry that will inevitably take place so again that places them at the centre of the action.

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  10. Dave Mann (1,246 comments) says:

    The mine is not a crime scene. Its the scene of an industrial disaster and I really don’t think that an organisation who’s primary function is to gather revenue for the government to aimlessly squander is the competent authority to investigate this. Also, who mentioned ‘search and rescue’? The single-minded focus of everybody right from the beginning was to do everything possible to prevent any attempt at ‘search’ or ‘rescue’.

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  11. V (765 comments) says:

    @Dave

    Are you kidding. Who would you suggest manage the situation then?

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  12. Rex Widerstrom (5,013 comments) says:

    I am surprised that this is only happening now.

    Years of unfettered freedom under Helen Clark (provided they came up with the findings she wanted when she demanded them) have got the police used to acting without consultation and not having their decisions queried.

    That arrogance is fed by the unthinking “the police know what’s best” attitude taken by so many NZers, and their hostility toward anyone who dare suggest otherwise, as though they’re criticising some revered national institution rather than an organisation composed of fallible human beings.

    They’re doing the right thing – belatedly, and only under intense pressure – in releasing the advice they received so that the public, and especially the families, can assess whether they feel the response of the police was correct. Trouble is, if experts now suggest it wasn’t, it’s too late to go back and undo what’s been done.

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