Food Prices

February 21st, 2011 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

The SST reported:

Rising have heightened public calls to make healthy eating more affordable. 

IN THE wake of moves to freeze the price of milk, calls are growing for cheaper food.

The government has already rejected removing its 15% GST from food, but a Sunday Star-Times online poll last week revealed almost two-to-one support for removing the tax from fruit and vegetables.

I’m amused that the media are doing stories on the costs of fruit and vegetables during a period when they are in fact hardly rising at all, but seemed to never do a story when they were going up.

The Food Price Index for fruit and vegetables goes back to 1999. From December 1999 to December 2008 the cost of fruit and vegetables went up 44% or 4.9% a year. From December 2008 to December 2010 it went up 3% or 1.7% a year.

Note that the 1.7% a year over the last two years includes the impact of the GST increase.

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49 Responses to “Food Prices”

  1. marynicolehicks (24 comments) says:

    So the public is calling to make healthy eating more affordable, yet there is support for better living conditions for pigs and chickens? Both of these drive up prices. Next the public will be pushing for better living conditions for cows while complaining the milk price is too high. If people want cheaper fruit and veges, just buy from the local market and cut out the middlemen.

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  2. KevinH (1,257 comments) says:

    Fruit and veges are relatively affordable in New Zealand, additionally most homes in New Zealand have enough room on their properties to grow your own vegetables and fruit. Historically New Zealanders kept their own gardens and fruit tree’s without to much difficulty therefore a return to self help is the most practicle way to go.
    The single outstanding issue confronting New Zealanders is the obesity epidemic caused by over indulgence in high fat and high sugar foods. One method to counter that is to raise GST to 20% on fast food in an attempt to discourage consumption.

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  3. david (2,194 comments) says:

    Makes a good case for promoting the cheapest possible production techniques for healthy and nutritious products like eggs doesn’t it?

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  4. RRM (10,099 comments) says:

    RRM believes:
    Charging a premium price for an identical product is lame and
    the sh!tty advertisements that this premium pricing pays for are lame too.

    [But on a serious note, no fussy govt controls please. People just need to ask themselves in the supermarket why they would pay more for the premium brand milk – have they ever seen a special “Anchor” cow eating special “Anchor” grass in a special “Anchor” paddock?]

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  5. Oskar (34 comments) says:

    Whenever we are at the supermarket I ask my wife does she want eggs from Happy Hens or does she want cheap eggs?
    She prefers eggs from Happy Hens – but also prefers cheap eggs. She has tried to compromise with barn eggs.
    If people only want eggs from Happy Hens, not only will the price of eggs go up but also the price of products that include eggs – ie a lot of bakery products. The compromise here will be we will end up importing eggs for manufacturing from places such as China where hens are not so happy, where food safety is more suspect but it keeps costs down. Mind you are already doing this with frozen vegetables – all those Watties frozen veges do not contain only NZ produce.

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  6. berend (1,690 comments) says:

    Funny? The MSM is currently running the Labour press feeds, because you know, they have to show their independence. That’s why we have all the stories about food prices, struggling families, and the collapse of our health care because National isn’t funding it enough.

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  7. ben (2,279 comments) says:

    Prices are always a proxy for scarcity. So the question is why have fruit and veges suddenly become more scarce?

    I have no idea but first instincts must be RMA constraints and regulation issues. Can any insiders speak to this?

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  8. OTGO (579 comments) says:

    Oh c’mon it’s the SST FFS. These jokers are the best at manufacturing a headline that bears little resemblance to the actual substance of the story.

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  9. ben (2,279 comments) says:

    KevinH: excuse my French, but fuck that’s a stupid idea. Seriously? We’re going to destroy the best part of taxation in New Zealand, its simplicity and uniformity, with an ad hoc exception for fast food on the theory that it has something to do with obesity, based on another theory that obesity is Bad?

    What is the problem with obesity? It doesn’t cause more health care costs, except at the very extremes. Its increase in recent decades is primarily due to reduced exercise, not increased calorie intake. And it is the product of people making choices, specifically the trade off between lifestyle and body shape. Eating high calories food is delicious. Being slim is also nice. People trade off one for the other. There is no justiciation for beating up the people who make choices different to you. None at all.

    The evidence is that when informed about how many calories there are in a Big Mac, people eat more of them, thinking there were actually more calories in them than there really are. Every (modern) liberal theory of obesity is wrong.

    New Zealand’s problem is not obesity. Its problem is wowser morons like you looking for any excuse to use government power to coerce to beat up on people guilty of nothing more than making different life choices to you. Bugger off.

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  10. PaulL (5,449 comments) says:

    DPF: I suspect amusement is not the right answer to this story. The ongoing economic illiteracy associated with removing GST from anything (or applying extra GST to anything as KevinH suggests above) needs to be countered every time it turns up. It would ruin one of the best GST regimes in the world.

    Further, the suggestion here is that healthy foods are too expensive, and therefore we need to make them cheaper. Another way to look at it is to ask whether people have enough money to afford healthy foods, and if so, why they don’t buy them.

    If they don’t have enough money, the answer is to alter the tax and transfer system to give them more money, not to attempt to make some selected foods cheaper. If they do have enough money, but choose to spend it on things other than healthy food, then we need to ask what they’re spending it on instead. If the answer is smokes and gambling, then I don’t think any changes to the price of food will change the outcome – we need to understand why they think smokes and gambling are a good spend of money.

    In other words, we need to deal with root causes, not with symptoms.

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  11. malcolm (1,952 comments) says:

    I suspect the reason that a lot of powa people buy junk food is because that is all they and their kids will eat. Getting kids to eat decent food can be a struggle and requires forbearance. I have no problem believing that parents who lack the resourcefulness and motivation to do better for themselves, also lack what is required to make and feed their kids decent food. Much easier to just give the kids what they want. And then blame the gubbment when they can’t afford their junk-food diet.

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  12. ben (2,279 comments) says:

    The one thing I take from the obesity debate is that the Left is never happy, and that their real enemy is freedom. Their job, therefore, is to invent problems associated with freedom in an effort to stifle freedom. Exhibit A: obesity. Exhibit B: CO2. Both products of expressions of freedom to eat and to consume energy.

    What’s extraordinary is the ability of the Left to take something so good – food so cheap all members of society can have all they can physically digest if they choose, and very low cost energy – and turn it into something bad. To do this they have to focus on the one cent of cost and ignore the dollar of benefits.

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  13. DT (104 comments) says:

    David,

    I think it is the fact that prices are now high, and continuing to rise that is worrying most people. Partisan shots at how different periods contributed to current high prices aren’t really of that much interest to most people (excluding clear partisans like yourself). What they care about is doing something about it now. Whichever party proposes something tractable will be listened to – national, labour, or even NZFirst. Your focus on how we got here isn’t tha illuminating to the question of what to do about it.

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  14. slightlyrighty (2,097 comments) says:

    DT.

    What was the solution of the last government where prices went up 4.7% per annum?

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  15. Pete George (23,798 comments) says:

    the suggestion here is that healthy foods are too expensive,

    That suggestion needs challenging.

    Some healthier foods are more expensive, some are not – especially when you grow your own.

    But the equation is not that simple. You need to look at quantity as well. Many people eat far more food than they need to. Even if all healthy food cost 50% more than unhealthy food the overall food budget could remain the same – you would eat healthier food, and less food which is also healthier.

    I used to be a glutton – quantity ruled. I felt aggrieved if I didn’t get the biggest portion. I ate far to much but was lucky to get away with it. Then I reached an age where too much food meant to much weight gain.

    How often do you eat far too much, regret the discomfort (and waistline impact) and realise you didn’t really enjoy it anyway?

    It’s been admittedly difficult adjusting from size, but now I’m happy to eat much less, but better quality. The cost is probably actually less, and now I’ve gotten over the “big is better” obsession I enjoy food more. A simple example – 200g of fillet steak with salad and baked spud is nicer to eat (and feels nocer afterwards) than 400g of rump plus chips. And on special it’s not more expensive.

    Eat smart, less fart.

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  16. PaulL (5,449 comments) says:

    DT: start with the question of whether prices are really high, and whether we really need to do something about it.

    1. Milk. Is the price of milk unreasonably high? What is the cheapest milk one can buy, say 3 litres of milk? Is there competition in that market, or has the govt created an artificial monopoly? Is that milk internationally traded – and how does our local price compare to the international price? My feel is that if you buy cheap milk, you’re getting some of the cheapest milk in the world. If you buy expensive milk……you’re getting a branded product.

    2. Fresh fruit and vege. I see road side stalls all over NZ, and most of them are pretty cheap for in season produce. What prices are we comparing? Are we trying to buy tomatoes out of season, or are we buying what’s cheap at the moment? Again, are these products internationally traded, is our price different than the international price?

    There is no sense in trying to make a product cheaper locally than it is internationally. Any regulations with that intent will just create a shortage or lower quality produce. If, however, things are more expensive locally than internationally, that almost certainly means some sort of failure of competition, and experience suggests that failures of competition are almost always created by some poor govt regulation (despite the rhetoric from the left about market failure).

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  17. wf (482 comments) says:

    Dammit – last year I could buy 6 dog bones for $2.99 (on a tray at the supermarket).
    Just before Christmas, the tray held 5 bones and the price went up to $3.99.
    Last week 4 bones – same price.

    100% increase in under 12 months!

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  18. Ryan Sproull (7,360 comments) says:

    Some healthy food is expensive, but by no means all. My local Countdown sells a very affordable soup pack, that includes:

    Two onions
    Two parsnips
    Two carrots
    Two celery sticks
    One swede

    And it’s like maybe $4. A soup with that (and a few cubes of vegetable stock) with some bread is a healthy filling meal for at least two people.

    On the other hand, a thing of spinach is around $5.

    For protein, I think mussels are about the best value you’ll get. Insanely cheap.

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  19. rwoodnz (9 comments) says:

    From where I’m standing in a typical Wellington suburb, veges have remained affordable, expensive fruit such as stone fruit has come down, while basic fruit has gone up. Typically in the supermarket now in JVille apples and oranges are $3-4 a kilo and bananas haven’t been below $2 a kilo for a long time. The net impact is that if you are trying to feed a familly healthily then you are paying substantially more recently.
    The answer is obviously the markets. Lower Hutt benefits from a decent market, as does the Wellington CBD and Porirua. However, in my case it doesn’t make sense to spend near $10 in petrol/car cost or bus fares to get there and the market at Tawa unfortunately doesn’t offer the same savings.
    One can grow their own veges and I do, although that’s not where the main cost is. Good luck growing fruit in Wellington’s wind and soil and even if successful they are going to take a few years to get established.

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  20. Grizz (613 comments) says:

    I think we have gone off track here. This blog is highlighting a factual hole in reporting and the fact the journalists are no longer capable of simple investigation from ready available sources on the internet. Over the last 2 years, fruit and vege prices have increased at a rate less than the rate of inflation. The 9 years prior to this they increased at a rate well above the rate of inflation. Yet for some reason the relatively high food prices has only just hit the MSM and they behave as if it just happened overnight. It just highlights gross incompetence from people trying to tell us the news. It shows how emotions cloud judgement. Sadly the truth just does not get reported anymore and when it does it is too late because some blogger has already put it out there.

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  21. Grizz (613 comments) says:

    Ryan, I agree. You just have to be creative. When I was short of money for a few weeks, I lived off rice, beans, onions and lentils. Porridge is also very cheap. You can feed the whole family breakfast for less than a dollar.

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  22. nasska (12,101 comments) says:

    For many people it is not the cost of food, it’s the fact that they have to get off their arses & prepare it. I have sympathy for some parents who are both working long hours & are frequently short of time but strangely enough it is not usually their kids waddling around town with a hamburger in one hand & a punnet of chips in the other.

    It may be the elephant in the room & very non PC to point the finger but the fact remains that fast food outlets are seldom shut on benefit days.

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  23. Ryan Sproull (7,360 comments) says:

    Ryan, I agree. You just have to be creative. When I was short of money for a few weeks, I lived off rice, beans, onions and lentils. Porridge is also very cheap. You can feed the whole family breakfast for less than a dollar.

    Yep, absolutely. Porridge is very healthy, too.

    Plus, frozen vegetables are just as nutritious as fresh ones, and generally less expensive.

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  24. DT (104 comments) says:

    @slightlyrighty. You miss my point. Yes, it appears that little was done in the past. But in this 2 year recession people feel it now, and didn’t so much before. It may be possible to criticise previous administrations (and I’m not defending it), but that is a sideshow. The issue is that a lot of people are feeling the high prices now, and that is what people care about.

    @PaulL. On the issue of milk prices, I am quite certain that there is a lack of domestic competition, largely due to the poor decision made under the previous govt. to allow a merger resulting in a supermarket duopoly.

    Finally, I am not advocating a particular solution. I am not sure that it is the best way to deal with things. Just noting that people didn’t hurt as much before as the economy was in much better shape, and unemployment was closer to 3.5% than 6.8% presently before. So political scapegoating doesn’t really help in solving the problems that many people do face.

    I am not a fan of having non-universal GST. But I do note that it causes surprisingly few problems in Australia. True, there are some costs, but the sky has not fallen.

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  25. slightlyrighty (2,097 comments) says:

    DT.

    Few Problems in Oz?

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2011/01/04/3106030.htm

    http://cgw.com.au/legal-alerts/april-2010/gst-new-rules-for-supplies-of-international-transport-and-insurance

    http://yasserelansary.blogspot.com/2010/12/let-gst-exemption-go-through-to-keeper.html

    http://members.ozemail.com.au/~marinedb/Issues.htm

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  26. DT (104 comments) says:

    @slightlyrighty. The examples you give relate to the non-imposition of GST on goods purchased internationally over the internet, and how to impose GST on internationally traded services where application is conceptually and tehcnically difficult. Neither really relate to the imposition of GST on fresh fruit and vegetables.

    The former example (non-imposition of GST on purchases made from international websites by individuals (ie not to on-sell)) actually applies in both NZ and Australia. Like Australia, local suppliers are lobbying to have GST imposed in international internet purchases to create a more even playing field. Unfortunately, this would be very costly and impractical (how do you actually make them pay? Do you make the purchaser make a voluntary payment to IRD?) and for the time being this seems to be preventing either country from imposing GST. It doesn’t really have any parallels with the imposition of GST on fresh fruit and vegetables. The latter example (difficulties putting in place a regime to ensure a just payment of GST on international services), is also unique to its the very complex cross-border arrangements that are often in place, which makes designing a fair regime very difficult. Neither example has any real application to GST on fresh fruit and vegetables.

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  27. Steve Wrathall (287 comments) says:

    Lab/Greens shed crocodile tears over milk prices. While wanting an ETS that will hit dairying even harder = costs that will drive milk up even more. Hypocrits.

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  28. DT (104 comments) says:

    @Steve Wrathall. Have you looked at the actual implementation of the ETS on farming? The two-for-one, the price cap, and the 90% issue of permits actually results in a cost of little more than 1 cent per kilogram of milk solids (currently well over 600 cents).

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  29. nasska (12,101 comments) says:

    DT @ 12.32pm

    “actually results in a cost of little more than 1 cent per kilogram of milk solids (currently well over 600 cents).”

    This reads as the best reason to scrap the entire ETS especially on farming. If it costs so little why would anyone think that it will have any effect on emissions?

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  30. DT (104 comments) says:

    @nasska. Well, I think the idea is that since New Zealand is bound under Kyoto to pay for its emissions that the ETS makes the emitters (rather than taxpayers) pay for some of it. Taxpayers still pay most of it. Introducing a low price on farmers is to send a signal that once there are options available to them to reduce their emissions economically, they will be expected to bear the cost of doing so. Starting with a small price until then helps to ease the transition. Or at least, that is the theory.

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  31. voice of reason (490 comments) says:

    Latest stats show a 7.4% increase in Fruit & Veg prices Dec – Jan

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  32. mpledger (425 comments) says:

    ben (1,557) Says:
    Prices are always a proxy for scarcity. So the question is why have fruit and veges suddenly become more scarce?

    Price is not always a proxy for scarcity. The supermarkets effectively get to set the price because they can choose not to buy produce if the price isn’t right. They can always go elsewhere or not sell it at all. Especially fruit/vegetables where the items can’t be branded easily.

    Grizz (247) Says:
    When I was short of money for a few weeks, I lived off rice, beans, onions and lentils. Porridge is also very cheap. You can feed the whole family breakfast for less than a dollar.

    You can live so long on that type of food (rice, bean, onions, lentils) before you start getting mineral defficiencies i.e. that diet looks really low in iron. (A friend of mine lived on carrots in her last year at uni and began to turn orange.)

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  33. Oskar (34 comments) says:

    DT
    This is a bit off topic, but since you raised the issue of GST in Australia and how the sky has not fallen in over there with some items GST-free, just a couple of thoughts.

    I have been told by an accountant that the Australian regulations take one metre of his shelf space compared ith the NZ regulations which are so simple to understand and administer.

    Just to see what is involved with their GST- free food have a look at the GST Food Guide from the Australian Taxation Office
    http://www.ato.gov.au/print.asp?doc=/content/18694.htm

    To the consumer it may seem simple, but there is an administrative cost which at the end of the day will end up on the price of the food.

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  34. DT (104 comments) says:

    @Oskar. True, anything like this will require some additional administration cost. Tax lawyers and accountants deal with these issues every day and they can cost a bit. I think though, that once you take into account the cost, and then the volumes that fly through supermarket shelves the `waste’ is pretty small. That is the point. I don’t for a moment pretend that there isn’t any, it just isn’t a hell of a lot in the scheme of things. If you have ever worked on these issues the cost of a legal opinion when spread across the volume results in fairly microscopic (but still present) losses of efficiency. In the context of the debate on whether you support exemptions it is terribly overblown. A lot of bloggers tend to take the argument and apply it in a reductio ad absurdum manner.

    If you support exemptions, you basically say that the distributive gains and promotion of healthy food outweighs the small efficiency loss. If you don’t support exemptions there are better reasons than the small cost to argue from. ie, that if you want to make food more affordable it is better to concentrate on ensuring incomes are sufficient and let people then decide for themselves just how much they value healthy food. It is a much better argument than the `sky is falling’ one about x-inneficiency.

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  35. SurvivorBias (2 comments) says:

    How did you determine the average price increase? It looks like you divided 44% by 9. If so this isn’t really a valid way to go (compare with calculating returns on investment). This is a situation when the geometric mean is more appropriate than the arithmetic mean.

    So if you take the 9th root of 1.44 this gives about 1.0415 and so a 4.15% increase in food each year works out to an overall increase of 44% over 9 years.

    [DPF: Yeah I did the shortcut. Agree not as valid, but the difference was not material for the comparisons]

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  36. ben (2,279 comments) says:

    MPledger

    Price is not always a proxy for scarcity. The supermarkets effectively get to set the price because they can choose not to buy produce if the price isn’t right. They can always go elsewhere or not sell it at all. Especially fruit/vegetables where the items can’t be branded easily.

    Yes, that’s a fair point – although the way a monopolist raises price is by restricting supply, creating artificial scarcity. Whether supermarket market power is a factor here I don’t know, but you might be right. The obvious sources of competition for them in fruit and vege are weekend markets, and farm gate sales. Has regulation stopped these? I hope not.

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  37. BeaB (2,164 comments) says:

    Even the SST could only dredge up a guy complaining of not being able to afford a square meal but spent $70 a week on fags and beer. That’s $10 a day – he could dine like a king on that.
    As John Key said, people make poor choices. What he can’t say is that most poor people are poor because they have low intelligence with all its attendant ills. The taxpayer is right to help them but it is a pity we can’t make sure the money is spent as it should be especially where kids are involved.
    Their obesity suggests they are obviously eating far too much and that kind of volume costs a lot of money. The same money spent on lean meat, whole grains, fruit and veg – and a glass of milk a day – would be much healthier.
    I am amazed the media are so obsessed with this. The poor, mostly wretched dumb hopeless buggers, will always be with us. Thank the lord they live in NZ where they get a house, education and income from their generous fellow citizens.

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  38. ben (2,279 comments) says:

    BeaB

    Their obesity suggests they are obviously eating far too much and that kind of volume costs a lot of money. The same money spent on lean meat, whole grains, fruit and veg – and a glass of milk a day – would be much healthier.

    Yes it might be, but then people don’t just care about their health. They care about other things. Some people prefer what tastes good, and for some people that’s fast food. Good luck to them. The only guaranteed result of government forcing health targets onto people who don’t want them is an unhappier populace and a bigger fiscal deficit. No thank you.

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  39. nickb (3,696 comments) says:

    God kiwis are fucking stupid.

    Removing GST on fruit and veges would be a complete fucking disaster. Only a kiwi could think up something so fucking dumb.

    And DPF it is drawing a long bow to try and contrast every single negative statistic in a news story with the same statistic in the 8 years of the Clark government. Not to mention petty. Labour has been in opposition for almost a term now, can we have some indication of when they will stop being blamed for everything under the sun?

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  40. Fishfurta (15 comments) says:

    Milk ! That stuff we buy and drink hardly comes close to the stuff that comes out of cows . There is a huge watering down after the so called “Milk solids” cream etc is removed then all sorts of crap is added (extra calcium etc). I wonder if we are using up re constituted “milk powder” ? You know , the stuff that China went off . Hold prices … well water is free I suppose .

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  41. DT (104 comments) says:

    @nickb (“Only a kiwi could think up something so fucking dumb”). You are well mistaken. Australia has zero GST on fresh fruit and vegetables. The UK has zero VAT on food and drink (although there are exemptions: alcohol, confectionary, crisps, ice-cream, soft-drink, takeaways.

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  42. Gooner (919 comments) says:

    The SST quoted a doctor who said sausages cost less than fresh fruit and vegetables.

    What rubbish.

    The cheapest sausages you will find are at the Mad Butcher. A kilo of apples at my local green grocer (not a supermarket) is $3.99, which is cheaper than sausages.

    A bag of silverbeet is $2.99. A bag of carrots is $4.99. Broccoli is about $1.50 per head.

    All are cheaper than sausages from the Mad Butcher, on a per kilo basis.

    We bought a bag of fresh pasta from Farro on the weekend – $5.99. It was flash Italian stuff too. We made a vegetable/tomato sauce using courgettes, fresh tomatoes, an onion, and some mushrooms. There was a splash of olive oil and some parmesan cheese on top – total cost about $14.

    We found some of yesterday’s Ciabatta loaf in the local bakery – $1. We heated it in tin foil in the oven.

    We fed four people dinner for $15. That’s less than $4 per person.

    Don’t tell me food is expensive. It’s damn cheap, if you know what to do.

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  43. PaulL (5,449 comments) says:

    Better yet Gooner – that’s a damn fine dinner. As compared to fish and chips or whatever, which more often than not doesn’t even taste all that good. If you chucked in a $10 bottle of average red plonk, you’re gourmet dining.

    My favourite is a big casserole of chuck steak, onions, carrots, leeks, garlic, mushrooms, and a goodly part of a cask of cheap red. In season it’s rather cheap. So long as you brown the meat well, and cook it for at least 4 hours, it’s divine. Chuck steak is about $11 per kilo, you need about 2 kilos, you’d feed 8-10 portions off that.

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  44. nickb (3,696 comments) says:

    @nickb (“Only a kiwi could think up something so fucking dumb”). You are well mistaken. Australia has zero GST on fresh fruit and vegetables. The UK has zero VAT on food and drink (although there are exemptions: alcohol, confectionary, crisps, ice-cream, soft-drink, takeaways.

    I withdraw and apologise. Only a pom or an ocker could think up something so fucking dumb.

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  45. Gooner (919 comments) says:

    Indeed Paul. Sheep heart is $2 each, and as nutritious as good steak. One heart feeds 4.

    I could write a book on tasty, cheap dinners.

    Example two.

    1/2 bag of rice (3 cups) – $1.50.

    1/2 bag of watties frozen stir-fry vegetable mix – $2.50

    Tin of tuna (in brine) – $2.00

    2 Eggs, beaten – $2

    Coriander $1.

    Onion – 50c.

    Parsley – 50c

    Cook the rice, cool. When cooled, in the wok it goes with an onion. Fry it. Cook the frozen vegatables for 2 mins. After that, drain and throw in the rice. Stir through the drained Tuna. Stir through a dab of sweet chilli sauce. Cook the beaten eggs as an omelet, chop into pieces and mix through.

    Add chopped coriander at the end (and parsley if you want).

    Total cost about $11-$12. Feeds 4, maybe 5. Cost per person $2.

    Don’t tell me food is expensive. It’s damn cheap, if you know what to do.

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  46. Bobbie black (507 comments) says:

    Food prices in Germany are cheap.

    Honestly, 40 Euros is a pretty big shop for us.

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  47. philu (12,989 comments) says:

    vistors here often comment on how expensive the basics of life are…

    and combined with the low wages…

    it’s a toxic mix..

    ..and i don’t eat any meat/dairy…

    ..but occaisonally i am shocked by an eye-watering price..

    ..i don’t know how you manage..

    phil(whoar.co.nz)

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  48. PaulL (5,449 comments) says:

    Not big on tuna myself Gooner. But I understand the concept. Bit of bacon might do the same job though. Or some sausage of some sort (maybe chorizo, not sure what that costs). Buggered if you’d get me eating sheep heart though.

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  49. Dazzaman (1,082 comments) says:

    Gooner, I love sheeps heart, and you’re right it is nutritious like steak! The taste is very similar to fillet steak but….most people think it’s too much like other offal. Livers ok but kidneys are fucken disgusting.

    Yeah, disagree somewhat with Farrar about food prices but there are options. Rice instead of spuds, which are very dear at the moment. Tinned fish, sardine sandwiches for lunches are cheap & tasty. Get veges at a market gardeners.

    The GST increase, some basic food price increases and fuel price increases all combine to make it tougher at the till.

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