Maori views on Marine & Coastal Area Bill

February 3rd, 2011 at 4:30 pm by David Farrar

have released part 2 of their poll of 1,000 voters.

They have asked “The new legislation replacing the Foreshore and Seabed Act is the Marine and Coastal Area Bill and is currently before Parliament. Do you support the new Bill?“. 24% said yes, 39% no and 38% don’t know.  so neither yes or no is the majority, but more are saying they don’t support it.

However when they are asked “Do you think the Maori Party should support the new Bill to become law?” it is almost a dead heat – 31% yes, 32% no and 37% don’t know. I think this sums up the challenge for the Maori Party – that there is a 50/50 split amongst those who have an opinion in terms of whether they vote for it.

There is a small difference by roll type. Those on the Maori roll are a net 3% against and those on the general roll a net 3% in favour.

Final question to Maori Party voters only was “Do you think the National and Maori Party coalition has worked in favour of your best interests? and 48% said yes and 46% no. Those on Maori roll were 4% net yes and those on geeral roll 8% net no.

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18 Responses to “Maori views on Marine & Coastal Area Bill”

  1. paws (197 comments) says:

    WTF who cares,

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  2. V (660 comments) says:

    Clearly it’s not a matter of who says yes and no, what needs addressing is the nearly 4/10 who don’t know anything about it. I would suspect a % of those who say ‘yes’ or ‘no’ also have no idea. After all how can you expect 1000 surveyed individuals to have such detailed knowledge of the bill?

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  3. lastmanstanding (1,154 comments) says:

    paws If this and all other matters concerning the Maori race arent settled and quickly we will see a increase in social problems as the Maori and PIs are the breeding races in our society and also at the bottom end of the net contribution to the economy.

    Their numbers and the apartheid voting system will give them power to disrupt the economic growth and development of our society

    Hone et al is positioning himself to take advantage of this situation . As Aunty said Hand they are haters and Wreckers

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  4. Jimbob (639 comments) says:

    In other words no one has a bl**dy clue, and I would include most of the general population in that category.
    John Key or Chris Finlayson, please explain.

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  5. Sean (294 comments) says:

    So basically Government should settle the issue immediately. The 4/10 Maori who don’t support the solution are the hardliners that will never vote National anyway.

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  6. adze (1,695 comments) says:

    Still don’t see why the government can’t simply repeal the 2004 Act and let the courts discover ownership as appropriate.

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  7. Redbaiter (13,197 comments) says:

    Disgusting separatism.

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  8. virtualmark (1,421 comments) says:

    Nicely encapsulating the key challenges for the Maori party:

    1. Most Maori aren’t what you would call “informed”. They don’t understand the detail (and may not want to). Meaning many are vulnerable to whoever can give the best tub-thumping speech and sway their decisions.

    and

    2. The ones who do have an opinion are not at all homogeneous – as we should expect, “Maori” is a broad church that encompasses a range of contradictory opinions. Meaning it’s all but impossible to please everyone, and there is ripe ground for malcontents to build a following.

    I’ll also add another:

    3. Hone Harawira is incapable of making constructive compromises, and incapable of seeing beyond his own narrow set of (self-)interests. That means he is destined to always be in opposition, always on the outside raging against perceived injustices and slights, but never able to sit at the main table and influence decisions. Like Winston Peters he is a mercurial politician whose only role is to be permanently in opposition. No one – Maori party, National party, Labour party, UNITE/Bradford party, whoever – will ever be able to strike an enduring and constructive working relationship with him. He will never be able to deliver real achievements for “his people”. But they will all share his rage.

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  9. Johnboy (13,342 comments) says:

    That’s a pretty good poll result really.

    In my long career employing Murri whenever I have asked. “Who stole it”

    The majority have always replied. “We don’t know boss”. :)

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  10. thedavincimode (6,102 comments) says:

    virtualmark

    Your point (3) is spot on. Like that despicable piece of crap Peters, Hone is there for Hone. He loves the attention and he loves the fact that all the deadbeats that he panders to look up to him. He has had a chance to do something positive for them, to show some leadership, but instead he reinforces the negative bro’ stereotype that screams “loser”.

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  11. Yvette (2,589 comments) says:

    “Most Maori aren’t what you would call “informed”. They don’t understand the detail (and may not want to). Meaning many are vulnerable to whoever can give the best tub-thumping speech and sway their decisions.”

    So, really, no different from the rest of the population.
    All polls, on any matter, should be accompanied with the results of general factual questions, as well as those relating to the issue in hand, to remind us all that very few have the slightest fucking clue about anything.

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  12. Nigel Kearney (747 comments) says:

    With anything relating to Maori issues, the courts have a tendency to rule in ways that would have been very hard to predict even by those familiar with the legislation. So I doubt that anybody really knows what the effect of the bill will be, except that we known from past experience it will be much more favourable to Maori than most reasonable people would expect based on the wording.

    I also very much agree with Yvette’s point. Chuck in a basic general question or two such as ‘Who are the co-leaders of the Maori party?’. This will distinguish those who are unsure about the bill from those who are just clueless in general.

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  13. Manolo (12,617 comments) says:

    The for and against figures mean little, actually bugger all, to Finlayson and Key, whom will have Parliament sitting under emergency to pass this dreadful piece of legislation later in the year.

    Reminds me of socialist Labour doing the same with the infamous EFA.

    Labour-lite has declared all bets are off in order to secure the racists’ support for the incoming election.

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  14. Yvette (2,589 comments) says:

    My suggestion was All polls – a question similar to Nigel’s – ‘Who are the co-leaders of the Maori party?’ – but to reflect the IQ of those polled.
    This comment arises from a poll that did look at general political awareness. The results were so disturbing I think that is the reason I have never seen it repeated – it drew into doubt the validity of all subsequent polls, which obviously wasn’t in the interests of paid pollsters.

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  15. adze (1,695 comments) says:

    With anything relating to Maori issues, the courts have a tendency to rule in ways that would have been very hard to predict even by those familiar with the legislation.

    Except they would be ruling on a case-by-case basis, not on the whole F&S as it applies to Maori. I’ve heard that the number of areas materially affected would actually be quite small, many of which few non-Maori visit anyway.

    I recall Chris Diack had some interesting things to say on the wider legal perspective, hopefully he will chime in at some stage.

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  16. Chuck Bird (4,401 comments) says:

    “My suggestion was All polls – a question similar to Nigel’s – ‘Who are the co-leaders of the Maori party?’ – but to reflect the IQ of those polled.”

    Why not ask who is the leader of the Labour Party? The answer would of course depend on what is meant by the equation? The officail leader of the real leader.

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  17. John Ansell (861 comments) says:

    John Key promised to pull the bill unless there was widespread public approval.

    Well, it’s now clear there is widespread disapproval. Even Maori disapprove, as did 94% of submitters to the Maori Affairs Select Committee.

    So why has John Key broken his promise (alongside the one to abolish the Maori seats) and reaffirmed his intention to pass the bill?

    Could it be that he is, in fact, running the country for the urban liberal females who came across to National on a three year trial, and not for his own voters at all?

    These urban liberal females of the Lucy Lawless/Robyn Malcolm ilk told Key to go to Copenhagen, so he went. They told Key not to even consider mining so much as a square inch of our national parks, so he meekly obeyed.

    Now the Lucys are telling him it’s OK to give away our beaches in a secret deal in Chris Finlayson’s office, so he’s doing it – and to hell with what his own party members think.

    That’s why he’s ruled out Winston: so those disgruntled supporters have got nowhere to go but ACT – whose support he feels he can take for granted.

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  18. Mr Robert Black (145 comments) says:

    Give the Maori, the black sand beaches, parore and the barracuda.

    Deal?

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