Maori Party candidates for Te Tai Tokerau

May 24th, 2011 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Yvonne Tahana writes in the Herald:

The candidate for the byelection will be selected today, with movie actor Waihoroi Shortland one of the leading prospects.

Mr Shortland, lawyer Mere Mangu and Whangarei Maori Party official Solomon Tipene will be interviewed at Waitangi today by a panel of eight. …

Mr Shortland, a charismatic and articulate former journalist known to many as “Wassie”, is a reo expert with connections to all of the major northern iwi. He starred in the movie Boy and has had a long career in Maori media.

Ms Mangu will provide strong competition. The leading voice for Tai Tokerau women, she comes with a significant degree of homegrown support and is known to stand and speak at Te Tii Marae at Waitangi.

However, her past unsuccessful attempts for the seat in 2002 and 2005, when she fought hard but finished off the pace as an independent, could be an important factor those on the panel will weigh.

Mr Tipene has less of a profile and ranks as an outside chance.

The stronger the Maori Party candidate, the more chance there is Labour could come through the middle and win the seat – which in this rare case is desirable.

Mangu got 7% of the vote in 2005 as an Independent. That is very high for an Independent.

It will be interesting to see who they select.

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11 Responses to “Maori Party candidates for Te Tai Tokerau”

  1. PaulL (5,446 comments) says:

    Desirable because:
    – it stops the Mana party getting a seat and therefore into parliament
    – it reduces the size of the Maori Party overhang, without actually giving Labour any extra seats (since their party vote wouldn’t change)

    Is that correct?

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  2. Adolf Fiinkensein (2,703 comments) says:

    PaulL

    What Mana party?

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  3. David Farrar (1,436 comments) says:

    The first for me.

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  4. Manolo (14,164 comments) says:

    The only positive outcome would be not to have the thug Harawira in Parliament, since his party counts for little or nothing.

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  5. Graeme Edgeler (2,972 comments) says:

    What Mana party?

    this one.

    A Party does not have have registration approved by the Electoral Commission to contest a by-election.

    Consider, for example, the last election in Te Tai Tokerau. David Rankin contested it for the Hapu Party. The Hapu Party is not a registered party and never has been.

    Consider, alternatively, the 2004 Te Tai Hauaruru by-election. Tariana Turia contested that as a candidate for the Māori Party, although the Māori Party was not registered with the Electoral Commission on nomination day.

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  6. Graeme Edgeler (2,972 comments) says:

    Manolo – Hone Harawira isn’t in Parliament.

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  7. Shazzadude (531 comments) says:

    I consider it more likely that the Maori Party candidate will be a hindrance to Kelvin Davis’ chances rather than Hone’s. This by-election will be a battle between the pro-Hone vote vs. the anti-Hone vote, much like any electorate battle that involves a personality cult.

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  8. Manolo (14,164 comments) says:

    Hone Harawira isn’t in Parliament.

    I appreciate the clarification, Graeme.
    I was referring to the possibility of this by-election not returning him for the next term. I, for one, would be happy.

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  9. Pete George (23,793 comments) says:

    Mangu got 7% of the vote in 2005 as an Independent. That is very high for an Independent.

    Very high for an independent maybe but it is not very high.

    Why don’t electorates look at options for becoming potential players in parliament rather than being another drone seat? The only virtual independents have been larger party dropouts. A few independent seats could add some balance and help keep large parties more honest.

    Is it a lack of strong independent candidates? Or voter habit? Or apathy?

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  10. Shazzadude (531 comments) says:

    “Very high for an independent maybe but it is not very high.

    Why don’t electorates look at options for becoming potential players in parliament rather than being another drone seat? The only virtual independents have been larger party dropouts. A few independent seats could add some balance and help keep large parties more honest.

    Is it a lack of strong independent candidates? Or voter habit? Or apathy?”

    I think it’s just the difficulty in someone not only developing enough of a local profile, but to also compete against a party machine and their resources.

    Derek Fox did come very close in 1999 to winning as an independent candidate (lost by 500 votes in Te Tai Rawhiti), but he was the mayor of Wairoa at the time.

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  11. Pete George (23,793 comments) says:

    That’s trying to beat them at their own game. Why not try asymmetric politics?

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