The Fred Hollows Foundation

June 2nd, 2011 at 2:02 pm by David Farrar

Back in 2009, I had what I thought was a great idea. To have a voted on by blog readers, and that we could then use the blog to fundraise money for, and organise fundraising events around.

Readers voted and selected the Fred Hollows Foundation. That was great. I met with them, and with Give-a-little who kindly offered to be the donor system. I also had various readers offer to help.

And then I got busy, and remained busy. And months went by and I hadn’t had the time to properly organise online widgets for donating, arranging a schedule of events such as debates and quiz nights etc. So then I though maybe I’ll make them the 2011 charity instead of 2010. But I still never managed to find the time, and then the earthquakes struck and that wasn’t the time to try fundraising for another cause, and then we’re getting close to the election and I realised that realistically I had over-committed and couldn’t  deliver what I wanted to.

Part of the plan was that I would donate 10% of the gross advertising income of Kiwiblog to . Today I donated $10,000 to the , as my contribution towards their wonderful live changing work. And for those mathematicians out there, no that isn’t 10% of the gross advertising income – it is a much much higher percentage.  But I feel it is what I should do to make good on what I hoped we could achieve.

At some stage I would still like to try using this online community to organise fundraising events for charity, such as celebrtiy debates and the like. But realistically that would need a part-time organiser, not someone with around four jobs like I have.

Anyway the point of this post is not to highlight my donation, but to encourage yours. if you enjoy reading Kiwiblog every day, and appreciate the thousands of hours that has gone into doing 50+ posts a week, then you can show your appreciation by donating to the Fred Hollows Foundation. They are one of those charities where even a modest donations can make a huge difference, because in some of the countries they work, they can restore sight for just $25.

You can donate to them at this link, or by clicking on the widget at the top of the left sidebar. Please do so if you can.

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19 Responses to “The Fred Hollows Foundation”

  1. stephen (4,063 comments) says:

    Well done you. In NZ and Australia (amongst others) this just isn’t done, often for fear of looking like a braggart, so highlighting substantial donations like this is what’s needed in countries like NZ to encourage others.

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  2. George Patton (349 comments) says:

    Nice work DPF. Now for The Standard to do the same….

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  3. annie (539 comments) says:

    I agree, it’s an excellent charity where donations aren’t sucked up by administration costs – they’re one of the few charities remaining on my donation list. Well done, and I’ll send them a bit more.

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  4. seanmaitland (501 comments) says:

    This is awesome, well done DPF. I personally donate every month to Save the Children which I think does some good work.

    I second George Patton, and wonder if The Standard would do similar, seeing as they hold themselves in such high esteem as being hard-working, everyday people’s champions.

    I got accused on The Standard a while back of only giving money to charities because I wanted the tax breaks, and of being greedy for doing this!

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  5. David Farrar (1,898 comments) says:

    I haven’t done this to make anything a competition, but if any other blogs want to support Fred Hollows (or any charity) I think that is a good thing.

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  6. Mick Mac (1,091 comments) says:

    David
    I the past I’ve dressed up as santa claus and done the deed for kids groups, my charge was a donation cheque to the Fred Hollows foundation for one op. people were very happy to pay and it was fun with the kids.
    May you get a good uptake of this endeavour as it makes a real difference out of all proportion to the investment.

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  7. campit (467 comments) says:

    Awesome. And the same operation costs how much in New Zealand?

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  8. kiwicraig (52 comments) says:

    Great stuff DPF. Have made donation

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  9. Paul Williams (878 comments) says:

    Bloody great work David, what a generous donation. Great that you’re encouraging others too – planned giving is a great way to provide regular support to the charity you best identify (whomever that may be). Again, well done!

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  10. Elaycee (4,392 comments) says:

    Well done David – very generous indeed.

    My ‘pet project’ is actually Starship. Haven’t needed them but have seen their brilliant work on many occasions. IMO they all deserve medals.

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  11. calendar girl (1,239 comments) says:

    Splendid initiative, DPF, and your own substantial donation will be put to very good use.

    Errr …. is it right and proper for a non-leftie like you to act in this caring and sharing manner? Our brothers and sisters on the left always seem to think that they have a monopoly on compassion and good work in the community.

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  12. James (1,338 comments) says:

    Campit: Awesome. And the same operation costs how much in New Zealand?

    Oh but Campit that’s why we have a benevolent state that taxes and regulates everything so that you aren’t exploited or faced with paying more for services you can get else where for a lot less.

    Oh hang on….

    And yes…great stuff DPF.

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  13. Sam Buchanan (501 comments) says:

    “Our brothers and sisters on the left always seem to think that they have a monopoly on compassion and good work in the community.”

    Not really, a lot of the people who do good community work are pretty apolitical.

    Fred Hollows was a raving leftist though (please don’t let that put anybody off donating to the foundation).

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  14. burt (8,274 comments) says:

    DPF

    That’s fantastic, well done.

    Have you calculated how many comparable eye surgeries could be completed in NZ v how many The Hollows Foundation will deliver for that? What would it be… 0.7822 v 500 ?

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  15. James (1,338 comments) says:

    If the Hollows foundation could set up a temporary clinic here and offer eye surgery for say $300 a pop for Kiwis and use the profit to fund eye ops overseas wouldn’t that be great? Trouble is the state backed medical monopoly wouldn’t allow it….too “unregulated and risky” etc for we poor lambs to be allowed to use would be touted as their reason….so much for a “free market”.

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  16. Mick Mac (1,091 comments) says:

    good points James about it funding overseas ops.

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  17. cha (4,022 comments) says:

    # James.

    Commerce Commission v The Ophthalmological Society of New Zealand

    The New Zealand Ophthalmologists Case shows up the importance which exclusionary conduct plays in competition assessments. In brief, this case involvedconcerted action initiated by the sole ophthalmologist in Invercargill to inhibit orprevent Southern Health from employing Australian ophthalmologists to performcataract operations at a cheaper rate in order to clear a two-year public patient backlogin Southland Province.

    The Invercargill opthalmologist involved various other ophthalmologists and sought and obtained the assistance of The Ophthalmology Society of New Zealand in his efforts. His actions prevented the relevant Australian ophthalmologists carrying outthe operations and included:

    • Concerted non-cooperation,

    • Concerted pressure being placed on Southern Health to reverse its decision, and

    • Attempts to have the relevant Australian ophthalmologists denied New Zealand medical registration

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  18. campit (467 comments) says:

    Interestingly, from the same 2005 report above:

    Despite the attempt to exclude Australian ophthalmologists from New Zealand, a comparative price evaluation of cataract operations is illuminating. In Invercargill, cataract operations were being performed initially at NZ$1,100 and, after the threat of new entry, at NZ$675. The price of cataracts in Australia, according to one newspaper survey, is about AU$2,090. That survey also concludes that there are close to 12,000 people waiting for cataract operations in New South Wales alone.

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  19. Wombat (1 comment) says:

    I hope that you don’t think that Fred was a Kiwi. He was an Aussie, and probably the greatest Aussie who ever lived, just eclipsing Phar Lap (Russell Crowe a distant third).

    I have read that he has helped even more people since his death than he did while still alive. Many of these were the poorest of all people – people who thought that the world had turned it’s back on them, that nobody cared. And yes, Fred was a lefty. Amazing that anyone could be surprised by that.

    Despite his well known opinion of religion, Gabi held his funeral in a Catholic church. That’s good enough for me. Saint Fred, Patron Saint of Australia, saviour of the forgotten.

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