Plagiarism

July 19th, 2011 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

The Herald’s put together a few days ago this video comparing a Close Up story to a story on ABC News in the US.

It is quite common to base stories on overseas stories. But I’ve never heard of a story using basically the same script and words. Close Up have now apologised after an initial “No problems” response. Good to see they have backed down, and kudos to Sideswipe for the story.

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9 Responses to “Plagiarism”

  1. Nick C (340 comments) says:

    Ironic how whilst the story takes an anti-trade perspective, the fact that they got the story in an exchange agreement with ABC News shows the benefits of trade.

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  2. mikenmild (11,246 comments) says:

    Reminds me of Paul Holmes and the ‘Polish two-way’ a few years back.

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  3. tvb (4,316 comments) says:

    The answer for the media is not more regulation but exposure such as this story. Bloggers today a valuable role and so does facebook and twitter. MSM have not got the hang of this. God knows what they go away with in the past. The media is an old whore – power without responsibility.

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  4. tristanb (1,133 comments) says:

    Those sanctimonious “current affairs” shows are constantly doing crap like this. And sadly, Nick C, the irony of having a story lamenting how everything in our homes came from overseas while ripping off an overseas story was probably not even contemplated.

    That Sainsbury bastard is good for nothing except as a gay icon, Mike Hosking is the most arrogant conceited tossser I’ve ever seen (and I live in Auckland), and John Campbell is just a shit-stirring wanker.

    They’re after a cheap story that’s easy to make and causes controversy. They’re generally not helpful in conveying information, and usually just like to dredge up extreme views for a bit of a fight. That’s okay if they’re paying for it themselves, but it’s unfair taxpayers pay Sainsbury’s exorbitant salary. It also false advertising to call them “current affairs” or “interviews”, they’re either puff pieces, press releases, politician promotions, or person interest stories.

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  5. Viking2 (11,346 comments) says:

    Well the ice rsult of the Murdoch shit is that with a bit of push and shove our local press and its bits might get sold off and we can get back to a better news service.
    Wishful thinking.

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  6. MyNameIsJack (2,415 comments) says:

    tvb (1,856) Says:

    July 19th, 2011 at 4:30 pm
    The answer for the media is not more regulation but exposure such as this story. Bloggers today a valuable role and so does facebook and twitter. MSM have not got the hang of this.

    BOLLOCKS!!

    Did you miss the bit where the story was broken in the Herald?

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  7. Mel (2 comments) says:

    tristanb (447) Says:
    July 19th, 2011 at 5:11 pm

    Those sanctimonious “current affairs” shows are constantly doing crap like this. And sadly, Nick C, the irony of having a story lamenting how everything in our homes came from overseas while ripping off an overseas story was probably not even contemplated.

    That Sainsbury bastard is good for nothing except as a gay icon, Mike Hosking is the most arrogant conceited tossser I’ve ever seen (and I live in Auckland), and John Campbell is just a shit-stirring wanker.

    They’re after a cheap story that’s easy to make and causes controversy. They’re generally not helpful in conveying information, and usually just like to dredge up extreme views for a bit of a fight. That’s okay if they’re paying for it themselves, but it’s unfair taxpayers pay Sainsbury’s exorbitant salary. It also false advertising to call them “current affairs” or “interviews”, they’re either puff pieces, press releases, politician promotions, or person interest stories.

    Absolutely beautiful!!!!!!!

    I couldn’t put it any better myself!

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  8. KH (694 comments) says:

    It is a mistake to think the MSM think of news as interesting stuff. It is more like a commodity that is bought and sold through wholesale and retail ways. Often with just a little re – packaging. Very prevalent in our ‘current affairs’ of the moment. You get some New Zealand presenter who says a few words in front of and behind a story that has simply been purchased from Australia or the USA. Deceptive – but obvious – if you watch for it.

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  9. KH (694 comments) says:

    A wonderful example of ‘repackaging’ for the audience was a programme some years ago about China. 4 Episodes – big production. A lot of documentary footage was shot. New Zealanders got to see Phillip Sherry speak to the camera as he walked towards them on the Great Wall. Australians got to see Jack Thomson, same words, same great wall etc. The crew simple travelled around with Phillip and Jack. Filmed one – then the other doing the same thing with same words.
    Result. Two programmes tailored for the audience. And economic for the producers.

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