More nastiness from Labour

March 1st, 2012 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

blogs:

’s commercial legal experience is limited to three years assisting one John Collinge, former President of the National Party who is better known for activity on the the table at the London High Commission than legal expertise.

He spent thirteen years at the University of Auckland but was unable to obtain a chair or a position in the Law School. He then became an undistinguished MP and a lacklustre Minister.

Mapp got the push from the National caucus but has been given a job at the – a role normally reserved for distinguished lawyers.

Cronyism again.

An incredibly nasty and spiteful post by Mallard, who continues to remind people of all that is bad within Labour. He doesn’t just attack the appointment of Dr Mapp, but denigrates his entire career.

I have no issue with people having a go at appointments not made on merit, due primarily to their political links. for example the appointment of Brian Neeson to the Human Rights Review tribunal was rightly criticised by many (including me).

The most outrageous crony appointments was when Mallard’s Government appointed Labour MP Di Yates to four separate boards – to Food Standards Australia New Zealand,  Trust Waikato Community Trust, education book publisher Learning Media’s board and the board of the Waikato Institute of Technology.  The appointment to FSANZ was justified in the press release on the basis Yates was from Waikato which is “arguably the food bowl of New Zealand”. Yes, seriously, that was the only rationale they could come up with..

But anyway back to Dr Mapp, his appointment needs a fairer appraisal than Mallard’s nasty denigration. I’m surprised he has such venom for Mapp, because in fact Wayne was one of the least partisan MPs in Parliament. In fact he was a member of the Labour Party for many years, before he joined National. He even stood against Phil Goff for the Labour nomination for Mt Roskill in 1981 (when Wayne was in his 20s). Most Labour MPs would be far more generous towards Wayne, and probably be mortified by Mallard’s nastiness towards him. However they allow Mallard to remain their public face.

Wayne has always had a great love of policy and the law. I first met him before he was an MP, when he was Northern Region Policy Chair, and I was the Young Nats policy person. He would happily spend hours debating policy and law with me and others. He’s exactly the sort of person you do want on the Law Commission – he won’t be partisan, he has huge intellectual curiosity (which is what you need on the Law Commission) and a passion for good law and policy. I think his appointment is an excellent one – and it is useful to have someone with actual parliamentary experience on the Law Commission, in my opinion.

As for his legal background, so denigrated by Trevor Mallard who has a BCA (and an assault conviction). Wayne has an honours degree in law from Auckland University, a masters from the University of Toronto and a PhD in international law from Cambridge. He spent 12 years as an academic in commercial law, and left as an Associate Professor before he became an MP.

The suggestion he got the push from the National Caucus is also a typical Mallard lie. Wayne’s decision to retire at the last election took everyone by surprise. His primary motivation for leaving Parliament was to open doors for his wife Denese Henare, whose activities as a lawyer had to be somewhat restricted while he was an MP. Denese, incidentally, has served on the Law Commission herself and I am confident that Wayne’s contribution will match her own distinguished record.

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38 Responses to “More nastiness from Labour”

  1. bhudson (4,741 comments) says:

    DPF,

    In fact he was a member of the Labour Party for many years, before he joined National.

    I think that one sentence explains the why

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  2. alex Masterley (1,539 comments) says:

    DPF, You are surprised by Mr Mallards comments. They are par for the course.

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  3. MikeG (425 comments) says:

    So after all the cricticism about the academics in Labours ranks, Farrar thinks that they’re not so bad after all. He then manages to mention Mallard’s assault conviction – have you ever mentioned big Gerry’s assault conviction when talking about his background?

    I’m no defender of Mallard, but if you want to take the moral high ground Mr Farrar, make sure that you’re on firm ground.

    [DPF: Brownlee does not have an assault conviction. Nothing wrong with some academics in a caucus. The problem is when a caucus is dominated by academics, teachers and unionists. Diversity is good]

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  4. Grizz (613 comments) says:

    Why does anyone listen to Trevor Mallard. Time and time again he is proven for what he is. A low blow shit stirring bullshiter from the gutter. He pulls his comments out of his arse and they should stay in the gutter where they belong.

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  5. metcalph (1,367 comments) says:

    MikeG,

    Brownlee does not have an assault conviction. He was successfully sued for assault in a civil case.

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  6. Michael Mckee (1,091 comments) says:

    I’ve never understood the public nastiness of Trevor Mallard and whilst many people tell me it is the hallmark of the liberal left I just can’t shake the question of “how come he is so slanted”?

    It’s not just politics so it must be who he is, ” a rude boorish person” or he has deep wounds that are manifest in this behaviour to others.
    Either way it is a choice and because he is not taken to task by his leadership, clearly the Labour party sides and agrees with him.

    Another reason that they don’t qualify for government and leadership, as shown by their membership falling from 80k to less than 10k over the years.
    sad commentary on a whole stream of NZ politics.

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  7. Auberon (779 comments) says:

    Talk about off the point MikeG. The histories of anyone other than Mallard, Mapp, and people who might fairly be labelled cronies – and Mapp is certainly not one – is all that matters here.

    I sometimes wonder whether Trevor is the full quid. That sort of unseemliness must make it very hard looking people in the eye, and can’t be good for one’s health.

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  8. Graeme Edgeler (2,972 comments) says:

    Trevor Mallard does not have an assault conviction either (unless he got one many years ago that I know nothing about).

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  9. davidp (3,587 comments) says:

    Mallard’s probably just pissed that he has to stay in Wellington writing Red Alert while his colleagues get to visit Auckland, shout racist abuse at the Islanders, slap a few scabs, and piss in a barbecue. No one likes to be left behind on a field trip.

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  10. Auberon (779 comments) says:

    Brilliant davidp, brilliant. Yep, the new Labour Party is a model of enlightened thinking and behaviour.

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  11. mara (770 comments) says:

    Oh I don’t know. Personally I always reach for the popcorn when our Trev or Winnie get to their feet in parliament.

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  12. Brian Harmer (687 comments) says:

    I’m a little surpised you gave it such a blast of oxygen, David. Let it die in a dark corner where it belongs.

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  13. Keeping Stock (9,392 comments) says:

    bhudson is right on the money; the worst crime that some in Labour see is actually having the blinkers removed, and seeing that Labour is not the answer to all our ills.

    Look at Phiilip Field for example; Labour defended him to the hilt until on the day that Helen Clark was to open the parliamentary year, he hinted that he might leave the party. From that moment on, Labour wanted nothing to do with him, and it was at Clark’s initiative that the matter was referred to the police.

    Len Brown is likely to face a similar fate in 2013.

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  14. F E Smith (3,310 comments) says:

    Gee, who was it that appointed Val Sim, I wonder? She makes Dr Mapp seem over qualified…

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  15. Grendel (1,015 comments) says:

    Guess Mallard wont mind when he gets given nothing but an application to Maccas when he leaves, as i bet he had a mediocre teaching career and will almost certainly be pushed out of the labour caucus (or dragged out by his mouth).

    What weirds me out is that there will be people out there who consider him a person of virtue, intelligence and worthy of deep respect. those people need (or are already on) serious medication.

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  16. mikenmild (12,611 comments) says:

    These sorts of appointments are often plain cronyism. Both parties regularly appoint their hacks to boards, diplomatic missions and anything else that’s going. Sometimes they also appoint good people. Pot is calling the kettle black and the kettle is saying “no, you’re blacker”.

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  17. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    Two Law Commissioners died in January – George Tanner and Helen Aikman.

    I agree, FES, that Val Sim should never have been appointed. Her most noteworthy achievement, if one can call it that, is to deny Peter Ellis justice.

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  18. tom hunter (5,135 comments) says:

    I’m surprised he has such venom for Mapp, because in fact Wayne was one of the least partisan MPs in Parliament.

    Ah, bipartisanship, the balm to a loss of political power, even though it counts for nothing when the time comes to compete for political power, as GHW Bush knows all too well. So, despite this argument I was not too puzzled up to this point, but then…

    In fact he was a member of the Labour Party for many years …

    … completely unpuzzled and the mystery solved. Think Peter Leitch, or perhaps Trotsky. When you leave the collective plantation you should be prepared for the hate; those who have been shown the light but chosen to return to the darkness are far worse than ignorant Tory heathens.

    Perhaps this is why the modern left-wing identifies so closely with Islamists?

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  19. David Garrett (7,709 comments) says:

    tom hunter: although I later gave them plenty more ammunitiion, I was anathema to Labour from the very beginning because I had once been an activist for them in the 80’s. At a forum on employment law I was shouted down and called a “class traitor” because I had moved on from once being a delegate for two unions to get a law degree. Its kind of sad really…

    DPF: That’s as vitriolic as I have ever seen you become old boy!

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  20. Pete George (23,859 comments) says:

    Seems to be a common theme here.

    But back to Bennett and her handling of these changes so far.

    She’s tough. She’s been there. She’s been a solo mum. She’s had it hard. She’s come out the other end. Labour hates her. And she hates them more. Labour regards her as a traitor in my opinion – and they’re going after her.

    http://www.3news.co.nz/In-defence-of-Bennetts-welfare-shakeup/tabid/1135/articleID/244787/Default.aspx

    It might explain why I keep getting mobbed by moaners at The Standard and Dim-Post, vitriolic vampires after the blood of labeled traitors. The sort of commenters who also talk up class wars in perpetual futility.

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  21. peterwn (3,346 comments) says:

    Graeme – Trevor did admit the charge and suffered some penalty – may have been diversion or discharge without conviction – I cannot remember. He wanted to clear the decks in good time prior to the next election. IMO his lawyer and the judge missed a trick. As the assault was minor, the judge should not have allowed the private prosecution to proceed unless the prosecuting person could produce a formal complaint from the victim, and as I understand it Tau being the decent bloke he is had no intention of complaining to the police over this. As much as I dislike Trevor Mallard, it was quite wrong that some busybody with no special interest in the matter could mount a private prosecution of this sort against him.

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  22. peterwn (3,346 comments) says:

    I regret to have to say that I was disgusted with Murray McCully’s attack on Terrence Arnold’s (then Solicitor General) appointment to the Court of Appeal some years ago. I sent Murray an email rocket over this and asked to be removed from his email list. That was the only occasion I am aware of where a judicial appointment was politically attacked. Similarly when Annabelle Young (as National revenue spokesperson I think) without any apparent foundation, attacked the appointment of a new Commissioner of Inland Revenue. So unfortunately it does seem both sides do play this game.

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  23. Graeme Edgeler (2,972 comments) says:

    Trevor did not admit assault. He pleaded guilty to a charge of fighting in a public place.

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  24. Paulus (2,721 comments) says:

    Trevor on the tokes and turps again.
    Nasty little schoolteacher, and not a very good one.

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  25. BeaB (2,166 comments) says:

    Trademe Trev (Trev the Tout) is just an expensive timewaster in the House. Winnie has lost it. Mallard thinks he is being clever but he is just being a smart arse.
    And what neck for a Labourite to criticise any High Commissioner after Jonathon Hunt’s disgraceful behaviour in the job.

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  26. dime (10,239 comments) says:

    Trevor is nothing but a piece of trash.

    As much as i hate having this idiot collect a decent pay cheque from the tax payer, look may he reign supreme as the face of labour!

    just a nasty little man.

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  27. peterwn (3,346 comments) says:

    Graeme – if it was a fight, why was Tau not charged too? I thought it took two to fight. Even so – Trevor still wanted to get the decks clear before an election campaign – last thing he wanted was a defended hearing just before an election and fair enough. Tau did not want to make an issue of it, nor did other MP’s on the scene (it was their space) so that should have been the end of it. If Trevor chose to fight that one he would have got off IMO. The person doing the prosecuting would have faced serious hurdles at a defended hearing.

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  28. DJP6-25 (1,394 comments) says:

    People on the dark side of politics don’t take kindly to opposiotin, or changes of mind. After all, Stalin, who was from the same side of the fence had some stern ideas about people who caused problems. To para phrase. If a man is causing a problem; you solve the problem by eliminating the man. That’s not possible here. But one can certainly slag the man off.

    And just think. Your grand kids will need a second job to help pay for these antics. I hope thye enjoy their second job. There’s a demographic catch though. With less people, there will be less demand for goods and services. So less second jobs available.

    cheers

    David Prosser

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  29. Ross Miller (1,618 comments) says:

    and how will Trevor Mallard be remembered when he finally quits politics …..or is run over by a bus.

    more to the point I suspect God will take great pleasure telling him to f**k off when he turns up banging at the pearly gates demanding admission.

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  30. Elaycee (4,425 comments) says:

    “Graeme – if it was a fight, why was Tau not charged too? I thought it took two to fight. ”

    How true. But it is no doubt hard for someone to respond when they have been king hit (from behind) in the corridors of parliament. Courtesy of Mallard.

    When Trevor eventually leaves Parliament (he either retires or is dumped by the ballot box), he will be forever remembered for one thing: he is a common thug.

    What a ‘legacy’…..

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  31. scrubone (3,097 comments) says:

    I’m still faintly amazed that, upon winning the post of Labour leader, Shearer didn’t immediately turn to Mallard and say “It goes without saying Trevor, that I want your resignation on my desk by morning.”

    But boy, National must be glad he didn’t!

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  32. mikenmild (12,611 comments) says:

    Okay, we get it – some of you don’t like Trev. But back to the point, does anyone here really think that these appointments of ex-MPs are a good thing?

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  33. Keeping Stock (9,392 comments) says:

    No mikenmild; mice try, but the topic of the post is Mallard’s nastiness. Hint: read the title

    More nastiness from Labour

    I know you have to try and divert, but this one’s probably an argument you should just give up on.

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  34. mikenmild (12,611 comments) says:

    You have misread the title. If it is really about “more nastiness from Labour”, then surely it is relevant to pont out similar antics from other parties when in power. As I said about, the urge to appoint cronies is widepread – just look at Wira Gardiner for example, Jonathan Hunt in London, Mark Blumsky in Niue, etc, etc

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  35. tom hunter (5,135 comments) says:

    Trevor did not admit assault. He pleaded guilty to a charge of fighting in a public place.

    Since Graeme dropped this truly wonderful line in this thread earlier today I’ve been thinking who else it reminded me of, a faint echo of some past character, and I finally got it:

    Wanted in fourteen counties of this State, the condemned is found guilty of crimes of murder, armed robbery of citizens, state banks and post offices, the theft of sacred objects, arson in a state prison, perjury, bigamy, deserting his wife and children, inciting prostitution, kidnapping, extortion, receiving stolen goods, selling stolen goods, passing counterfeit money, and contrary to the laws of this State, the condemned is guilty of using marked cards…Therefore, according to the powers vested in us, we sentence the accused before us, Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramirez and any other aliases he might have, to hang by the neck until dead.

    May God have mercy on his soul. Proceed.”

    Oh come on! Is that not Trevor or what!

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  36. mikenmild (12,611 comments) says:

    Reminds me of Gibbon on one of the Popes:
    “the most scandalous charges were suppressed; the Vicar of Christ was only accused of piracy, murder, rape, sodomy, and incest”

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  37. tom hunter (5,135 comments) says:

    And there was me always thinking Gibbon was boring. :)

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  38. mikenmild (12,611 comments) says:

    Well, he puts the nastiness of present-day politicians in perspective.

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