Sanctuary to Sea Walkway

May 28th, 2012 at 4:30 pm by David Farrar

Sanctuary to Sea


EveryTrail – Find hiking trails in California and beyond

I had wanted to do the Sanctuary to Sea walk for a while, but as it is not a loop needs two cars. As I roped in Stats Girl, Mr Stats Girls and DC Girl, along with their three dogs, we did it on Saturday leaving one car at Zealandia, and drove to Trellisick Park. Despite the name of the walk you finish, not start, at the sanctuary.

Trellisick Park I have done several times, and was as always a pleasant walk next to the stream. I must be getting fitter as the steep climb section seemed less strenuous.

Once you reach Wightwick’s Field, you carry on and eventually emerge on Waikowhai Street. Then you turn left and carry on the main road until you reach the entrance to Wilton Otari Bush. You enter the reserve and just folow the main track until you get to the picnic area. Then follow the blue track uphill, and after a bit of a climb you suddenly have some graves about you.

You then have a walk past hundreds of graves in a part of Karori Cemetery I didn’t even know existed. I liked the area so much that I even said this could be a good backup location for my future grave, if I can’t get into the Bolton Cemetery (which will need some sort of law change).

You then exit the cemetery and then walk down to the park, and back to Zealandia.

Around 7.5 kms, and took just under two hours. A really nice walk, and I was amazed one could spend so much of that distance amongst bush. We are lucky in .

Tags: , ,

8 Responses to “Sanctuary to Sea Walkway”

  1. RRM (9,441 comments) says:

    Oh dear, methinks Dick Prebble just laid his own soul bare :-)

    DPF – for a chap of your stature you do some pretty solid walks dude; genuine respect.

    You could use the #3 bus and the #43 bus as another way of doing it if two cars are not available…

    The Karori Cemetery is cool but it only strengthens my resolve to have ashes scattered in a forest or at sea. There’s something profoundly sad and pathetic about all those old derelict graves that nobody visits, forlornly trying to immortalise the long-dead who nobody now remembers or cares about. Once I’m gone I’m gone, the unending cycle of life goes on without me, and I would far rather my family spent money on a big holiday and grog to drink together, than some grey concrete memorial..

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. davidp (3,540 comments) says:

    RRM>There’s something profoundly sad and pathetic about all those old derelict graves that nobody visits, forlornly trying to immortalise the long-dead who nobody now remembers or cares about.

    I’m with you on that. I also have my doubts about current funeral arrangements. I’m not sure why people would want to hold some sort of commemoration while my dead body was sitting in a wood box in front of them. It isn’t as if I can hear them, and they don’t need my body in the vicinity to remember me. So why don’t they cremate me at the hospital, and my friends can get together in a pub?

    Note that this is a hypothetical question… I intend to hang on for another 50 years or so.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Johnboy (14,961 comments) says:

    Hell it will be the Southern Crossing next!! :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. krazykiwi (9,189 comments) says:

    Good on ya DPF! We have some fantastic walks in and around Wellington. Getting out is super healthy, not only for the fitness, but also because you can’t blog at the same time :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. althecat (7 comments) says:

    This looks like a fantastic walk. Have done much of it in bits but never the hole thing. Thanks for blogging it.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Mary Rose (393 comments) says:

    RRM>There’s something profoundly sad and pathetic about all those old derelict graves

    I think they are romantic. Not hearts and flowers romantic, but imagining who they were and what their lives were like.

    What I don’t get is why you are expected to choose an expensive coffin (choose the wood, choose the handles) when it’s going to be incinerated or stuck in the ground after a couple of hymns or songs and a speech or two.
    Cardboard box would do me!

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. bc (1,334 comments) says:

    DPF: “We are lucky in Wellington.”
    If living in Wellington is ‘lucky’ I’d hate to see what misfortune is :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. Johnboy (14,961 comments) says:

    Being time-locked in a safe for 24 hours with you springs to mind bc. :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.