The Nation China Special June 9-10 2012

June 6th, 2012 at 6:17 pm by Kokila Patel

This December marks the 40th anniversary of New Zealand’s establishment of diplomatic relations with China. “” this weekend will examine that relationship over a full programme on China.

1. Natasha Smith reports from the boom city of Shenzen on what the Chinese economy has to offer NZ.

2. Jenee Tibshraeny meets Future Dragonz — the young Chinese-New Zealand professionals who want to build bridges between the two countries.

3. Natasha talks to Cheng Lei, Counsellor at the Chinese Embassy in Wellington on the NZ-China relationship and on what China wants in New Zealand and the Pacific.

4. Richard Harman talks to Foreign Minister Murray McCully on our relationship with China.

5. Simon Shepherd will present the programme (Rachel is delayed returning from Ghana) and he will be talking to Labour’s Foreign Affairs spokesman Phil Goff and the Chairman of the NZ China Trade Association, Tim White.

Next weekend – the 16/17 th June we will have an extended interview with Prime Minister John Key. Rachel will be joined by John Hartevelt from Fairfax’s Press Gallery office and Alex Tarrant from Interest.co.nz.

Broadcast Saturday June 9.30 am, and repeated Sunday June 3 at 8 am on TV3

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8 Responses to “The Nation China Special June 9-10 2012”

  1. Johnboy (17,007 comments) says:

    Hope it all means we can get Double Happys, Tom Thumbs, Jumping Jacks and Rockets back again! :)

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  2. jaba (2,146 comments) says:

    will anyone interview one of the Greens co-leaders .. China is close to Normans heart but we need to hear more from his buddy

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  3. SPC (5,775 comments) says:

    I’m guessing nothing on China’s attempt to dispossess neighbouring states from the economic resources of their 200 mile economic zones.

    And we campaigning to represent the smaller nations at the UN on the SC will say nothing about this.

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  4. Keeping Stock (10,436 comments) says:

    I hope they have an interview with Winston Peters, who of course traces his bloodline back to China…

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  5. Paulus (2,668 comments) says:

    Keeping Stock

    Winston is not from China, but from the tribes who live in South East Taiwan, like all Maori, as PROVEN by DNA.

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  6. hj (7,066 comments) says:

    I hope they mention Harcourts Shanghai and their export successes!
    http://static.radionz.net.nz/assets/audio_item/0011/2385074/mnr-20100824-0842-More_than_800-million_dollars_worth_of_property_on_display-m048.asx

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  7. mara (795 comments) says:

    China will take control of NZ. It is just a matter of time. I will be dead by then so I’ll be outta here. History repeats.

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  8. libertyscott (359 comments) says:

    New Zealand has had diplomatic relations with China far longer than 40 years.

    What happened 40 years ago is that recognition shifted from the diplomatic relations with the Republic of China (which at the time only had effective control over Taiwan and a few other islands) to the People’s Republic of China, as the Third Labour Government warmly embraced Chairman Mao’s totalitarian regime a few years after it had murdered and starved around 60 million people. Of course, the Chiang Kai Shek dictatorship was not one of angels and it was increasingly anarchronistic to consider the ROC as representing all of China, but New Zealand DID have diplomatic relations with China.

    The change in 1972 was from one China to the other (although both at the time and the PRC still deny there were two “governments” of China – although in fact there were and still are).

    It shouldn’t be forgotten that the warmth that many had for Mao’s China, such as Sue Bradford, Keith Locke and the like was considerable – a stark contrast to them today, even though the China of today is far more prosperous and free than the poor personality cult laden aggressor state that it was in 1972.

    It would have been preferable to wait until both Chiang Kai Shek and Mao died before shifting recognition and diplomatic relations, but few could have forecast the post 1978 transformation of the country.

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