Russia and the Internet

July 12th, 2012 at 10:00 am by David Farrar

Reuters reports:

The Russian version of online encyclopedia Wikipedia closed its site on Tuesday in a one-day protest against what it said were plans by President Vladimir Putin to create his own version of the “Great Chinese Firewall” to block dissent on the .

Supporters of amendments to ’s information law, which were proposed by the ruling United party and will be discussed in parliament on Wednesday, say changes are needed to protect children from harmful sites.

But leaders of anti-Putin protests say the new law could shut down websites in Russia such as Facebook and Twitter without a court order and is meant to stop their opposition movement, which is organised via social networking sites.

“These amendments may become a basis for real censorship on the Internet – forming a list of forbidden sites and IP addresses,” Russian Wikipedia said in a statement.

“The following provisions and wording undertaken for discussion would lead to the creation of a Russian equivalent of the ‘Great Chinese Firewall’ … in which access to Wikipedia could soon be closed across the entire country.”

This is the same Russia that wants the ITU to be given regulatory authority over the Internet (see previous post and link to petition).

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7 Responses to “Russia and the Internet”

  1. fish_boy (152 comments) says:

    What on earth has Russia censoring the internet got to do with the ITU? Can you explain this apparently random association? Or are you peddling a ridiculous smear by association?

    [DPF: If you read the previous post, you would see that Russia has proposed that the ITU be given regulatory authority over the Internet, and that this should be used to delete content that interferes with the"internal security" of a state".

    By the way if in future you say I am smearing someone you will get demerits]

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  2. Alan Wilkinson (1,849 comments) says:

    SInce Russia is a major source of internet scammers and crooks protected by the State and no doubt contributing funds to it the world should treat all its proposals with contempt.

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  3. hmmokrightitis (1,572 comments) says:

    An old colleague of mine from many moons ago has been based in Russia for nearly 20 years. Made a fortune as an investment banker. Recently reconnected with him, and asked him about working there, as Ive never been, always wanted to go.

    To sum up his response: Corruption in every single everyone does, it is expected. End of story.

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  4. jims_whare (399 comments) says:

    Democracy/Freedom & Russia have never been easy bedfellows.

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  5. Manolo (13,517 comments) says:

    The Financial Times on the subject: http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/9b122512-cb71-11e1-911e-00144feabdc0.html#axzz20NEKc2tT

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  6. thor42 (971 comments) says:

    “This is the same Russia that wants the ITU to be given regulatory authority over the Internet.”
    Exactly!
    In spite of fish_boy’s difficulty in understanding things (obviously a Labour suporter), it is not at all difficult to foresee what woudl happen if the ITU gained Internet control. The Russians would ply the ITU people with booze, money and pretty women, and in return they would “suggest” that the ITU get rid of certain sites critical of the Russian government.

    At the moment, the net is pretty much under US control, and for all the faults of the current control regime, I daresay that any country trying the above stuff under the present control system would be told to piss off.

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  7. valeriusterminus (247 comments) says:

    Sounds reasonable to me…

    http://www.rt.com/news/itu-internet-revolution-russia-386/

    “This initiative could guarantee a “multilateral, transparent and democratic international management of the internet””

    Willbe a solution to the US centric domination / confiscation of “aberrant” internet opinion.

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