Wellington congestion

August 6th, 2012 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

From last week, Stuff reports:

Four of the top 10 most congested roads in New Zealand are in Wellington.

The SUNA Traffic Channel made an analysis of major metropolitan roads using speed and vehicle data from thousands of vehicles carrying GPS systems.

1. Southern motorway around the Ellerslie Panmure Highway exit (Auckland)
2. Northwestern motorway between Great North Road and Rosebank Road (Auckland)
3. Northern Motorway between Tristram Ave and Upper Harbour Highway (Auckland) 
4. Johnsonville to Porirua Motorway from Takapu Road to Westchester Drive (Wellington)
5. Southern Motorway between Wrights Road and State Highway 75 (Christchurch)
6. Western Hutt Road (Wellington)
7. Wellington Urban Motorway (Wellington)

8. Southwestern Motorway between Rimu Road and Onehunga Harbour Road (Auckland) 
9. Pakuranga Highway/South-Eastern Highway (Auckland).
10. Centennial Highway between Johnsonville and Newlands roads (Wellington)

Auckland gridlock is worse, but this shows Wellington congestion is still a big issue. Transmission Gully will help with some of that, but not all.

No tag for this post.

10 Responses to “Wellington congestion”

  1. Mike Readman (366 comments) says:

    The only problem with no 5 seems to be people drivning too slow. The speed limit is 100, not 50! Well, it’s 50 now due to roadworks, so if it’s only been congested since they started, there’s your reason.

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  2. Alan Wilkinson (1,866 comments) says:

    Reducing the size of Government seems a cheaper solution to Wellington traffic.

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  3. anonymouse (709 comments) says:

    Transmission Gully will help with some of that, but not all.

    Transmission gully will have no impact on any of those 4 congestion points, as it does not begin until well north of Takapu road,

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  4. wreck1080 (3,865 comments) says:

    But Wellington is also stupid place to build a big city. Being so hilly roads are naturally routed through the valleys and level areas. This causes bottlenecks. But, Wellington is a neat city and the hills add character.

    The real issue is our economy. If we had a better economy (ie, not just based on milk powder) we could afford to drill tunnels everywhere without a thought.

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  5. RRM (9,773 comments) says:

    Transmission gully will merely help you get to those congestion points faster! :-D

    But seriously, I’m surprised #9 isn’t further up the list. That whole side of Auckland is just fucked at rush hour.

    1+9 was my daily commute for several years, before I got a bus pass and a newspaper subscription and started enjoying my trip to work in the morning…

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  6. Viking2 (11,367 comments) says:

    1+9 was my daily commute for several years, before I got a bus pass and a newspaper subscription and started enjoying my trip to work in the morning…

    You found an interesting newspaper.
    Nah not beleiveable.
    You use it to hide the porn mags.
    :cool: :cool: :o :roll: :lol:

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  7. Steve (North Shore) (4,543 comments) says:

    Porn mags V2?
    They all have these tablet thingys with quick links to ORSM dot net hahaha.
    Big coats to keep you warm as well

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  8. nasska (11,138 comments) says:

    …..”Big coats to keep you warm as well”…..

    The ones with holes cut into the pockets? :)

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  9. Griff (7,316 comments) says:

    Steve (North Shore)
    porn fiend I had to look it up how dear you pollute my innocent mind with filth

    any more?

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  10. hj (6,827 comments) says:

    Hardly anyone would qualify Boston’s Newbury Street – a historic commercial thoroughfare lined with shops, restaurants and people – as a failure. The street draws strollers, shoppers, commerce and traffic, all the ingredients of a successful place. Much like New York’s Fifth Avenue, Market Street in San Francisco, or Chicago’s Michigan Avenue – other immensely successful, iconic streets – Newbury Street is oftentimes congested, a symptom of its success.Yet to some, congestion is only a sign of inefficiency, a plague that must be eliminated, no matter what the cost. Since the end of World War II, federal and individual state DOTs have been utilizing the Functional Classification System – a system in “which streets and highways are categorized according to the character of service they are intended to provide” – as their guide in an epic battle to combat congestion. The application of the Functional Classification System has narrowed DOTs focus to increasing the speed of vehicular movement, usually by expanding road capacity. This one-size-fits-all prescription takes no account of the context of the surrounding area, and when applied often reduces the value of cities and towns.

    Take, for example, Detroit. At the end of World War II, Detroit was a rich and prosperous city. It was the epicenter of manufacturing for the war effort. The city had 300 miles of electric streetcar lines running along its system of boulevards and streets, modeled after Pierre L’Enfant’s DC plan. Its downtown bustled as a shopping destination, with three department stores – Kern’s, Crowley’s and Hudson’s. Sixty-plus years of expressway construction and widening streets to fight congestion have been successful. Detroit no longer has a congestion problem. It wishes it could have it back, along with even one of the long-gone department stores.
    In a recent article for The Atlantic Cities, Florida Atlantic University professor Eric Dumbaugh analyzed the extent to which traffic congestion has a negative effect on urban economies. He found that “every 10 percent increase in traffic delay per person was associated with a 3.4 percent increase in per capita GDP.” This is counter-intuitive at first glance, but any visitor to Newbury Street would understand Dumbaugh’s analysis.
    The Functional Classification System may be a good way to organize a road network in rural areas, but applying it to urban contexts makes little sense. When Newbury Street is rated “F” based on congestion, it represents a fundamental misunderstanding of what congestion means. Newbury is congested with people socializing, exchanging ideas and spending money. It’s congested with prosperity and happiness.

    Congestion doesn’t create prosperity, but congestion does tend to result from it. Eliminating congestion from cities, as the Functional Classification System attempts to do, can remove the vitality from urban neighborhoods. To add lasting value to communities, transportation engineers and planners need to go beyond mobility and restore the market and social purposes of urban thoroughfares.
    http://www.planetizen.com/node/57861

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