Who started food in schools?

September 24th, 2012 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

A reader pointed out this 2007 press release:

National Party Leader John Key says he is shocked and appalled that senior Labour Minister Steve Maharey has described a plan to feed children in our poorest schools as ‘Tory charity’.

“Labour’s more interested in petty patch protection and name calling than it is in getting food into the stomachs of hungry children.

“Labour has already clearly demonstrated how out of touch it is with this issue. Experts have been quoting a range of numbers that show thousands upon thousands of kids are turning up to school hungry.

“So, in the face of the overwhelming evidence, Mr Maharey has finally said he would welcome business contact with schools keen to adopt National’s programme.

“Yet this is a Minister, who less than 24 hours earlier, insultingly accused businesses behind the programme as being part of ‘Tory charity’. Both he and Helen Clark had earlier claimed there was no need and no demand.

“National understands the severity of the problem, and I’m not pretending this is the magic bullet to our social problems, but it is a positive first step.

A useful reminder that National started the food in schools programme, against opposition from Labour.

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24 Responses to “Who started food in schools?”

  1. Mighty_Kites (77 comments) says:

    And yet now National opposes it, which is more hypocritical because Labour has since had two leadership changes, whereas it’s still the same mug running National

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  2. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    Two words DPF – Animal Farm.

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  3. Pete George (21,793 comments) says:

    And yet now National opposes it

    Opposes what? I’m not aware of National opposing any current food in school programme.

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  4. b1gdaddynz (264 comments) says:

    I am pretty sure that they are opposed to extending it to all schools as they prefer a more targeted approach.

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  5. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    A useful reminder that National started the food in schools programme, against opposition from Labour.

    Why do we need to be reminded of something that isn’t true? And how it such a reminder of use? [except as a diversionary tactic]

    National wasn’t in government in 2007. How on Earth did it start a food in schools programme?

    National has been in government since late 2008, has it started a food in schools programme?
    [FYI, the answer is "No"]

    The useful reminder we need is that the private sector started the current food in schools programmes, and continue to run them, with neither National nor Labour having had anything to do with them.

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  6. flipper (3,266 comments) says:

    Look, the whole debate is crap.

    We have four grandchildren living with us – aged 8 to 15.5 yrs.

    Every morning they have a choice of eggs, boxed cereal, porridge, canned fruit and toast, for bredakfast. The 15.5yr old gorilla and the 12 year old female house ape refuse (repeat, refuse) to eat breakfast.

    Every day, all four go off with abundant boxed lunches (including fruit) in their bags. The 15.5 yr old eats his lunch on the bus before reaching his High School. The 12 year old female returns home with her lunch in tact – and then raids the refrigeratir and the pantry bemoaning the fact that she is hungry.

    The eight year old, who reckons he will be “Pime Minister John Key” one day (he has met him!), has eggs and toast for breakfast aliost every day – and he eats his lunch. The 10 year old female does cereal and fruity am, and eats her lunch (we think, but still raids the ‘fridge.

    The lesson?

    You can lead the horse to water..,.,,,.

    It is time to stop attermpts at social engineering. Kids will eat if and when they wan – what they want. All the rest, including all the hand wringing and posturing, is just crap.

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  7. seabreezeent (31 comments) says:

    I’m confused, is this supposed to make National look good or bad.

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  8. wreck1080 (3,519 comments) says:

    Labour don’t care about the poor or hardtrodden workers.

    Labour are more about ‘social engineering’ and their own constituency often gets in the way .

    Personally, I reckon kids who go to school hungry have parents with drug and alcohol issues. The problem is not money, it is the parents.

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  9. flipper (3,266 comments) says:

    Graeme E et al…

    Did not Fonterra start/attempt to start something? Can’t recall.

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  10. Manolo (12,608 comments) says:

    More flips (and flops) than pancakes at IHOP.

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  11. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    Graeme E et al… Did not Fonterra start/attempt to start something? Can’t recall.

    I believe I can recall something about them proposing to give milk to some schools. Not sure what happened.

    Do you think DPF might claim National is responsible for that too?

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  12. scrubone (2,971 comments) says:

    National wasn’t in government in 2007. How on Earth did it start a food in schools programme?

    I think the point was that when they announced that they would do it when they got into power, it was derided.

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  13. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    I think the point was that when they announced that they would do it when they got into power, it was derided.

    Derided so much, that when they go into power, they didn’t start a food in schools programme?

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  14. Pete George (21,793 comments) says:

    Do you think DPF might claim National is responsible for that too?

    Everyone knows that National and cow cockies are like tits in milking cups.

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  15. Kevin (1,122 comments) says:

    Is a Tory another name for a Remuera Socialist?

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  16. Hamnida (905 comments) says:

    Chelsea tractor, Remuera socialist – same thing.

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  17. backster (2,000 comments) says:

    I wonder if those caring teachers and other feeding the kids at school will keep the programme going during the school holidays after all if the kids get nothing for brekky or lunch for a fortnight they will be a bit peckish by the time school resumes.

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  18. Rick Rowling (776 comments) says:

    Is a Tory another name for a Remuera Socialist?

    Tory – a term used by some on the left in New Zealand to try (and sadly fail) to equate the New Zealand National Party with the UK Conservative Party. They would probably also use the term Republican if it wasn’t confused by the republican/monarchy debate, and would also try GOP, but no-one here knows what that means.

    Basically, it’s a way to know at a glance to disregard the comment without reading, as it will be a knee jerk denial of all things National, not a well thought-out argument.

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  19. RightNow (6,334 comments) says:

    In 2007 John Key announced:

    Mr Key has since received an approach from Auckland-based company Tasti foods.
    “I approached Wesley Primary School yesterday, a decile 1 school near McGehan Close, a street that has had more than its fair share of problems in recent times. I am told Wesley Primary, like so many schools in New Zealand, has too many kids turning up hungry.

    “We’re putting Tasti and Wesley Primary together. This is a fantastic first step. In addition to this, Tasti has indicated they may wish to expand their generous donation of food to other schools in need, and we’ll be looking to facilitate that.

    The principal of Wesley Primary then said the school didn’t need the help, and Phil Goff announced:

    Responding to news that National has partnered Wesley Primary School with Tasti foods, which will provide breakfast cereal to the decile 1 school, Phil Goff told the New Zealand Herald ‘I can’t claim to have seen evidence of malnutrition in my electorate’.

    Maharey said

    National leader John Key’s offer to supply breakfast to Wesley School shows how out of touch he is, says Education Minister Steve Maharey.

    Mr Maharey said today that John Key arranged for Te Atatu cereal maker Tasti Products to supply breakfast to students without properly consulting the school.

    “The breakfast plan for Wesley School was not needed nor asked for. It is just another national party stunt; an insulting stunt for which John Key should apologise to the school and the community.”

    All quite clear – Wesley School didn’t need a breakfast program from that nasty Mr Key.

    Roll on to 2012:

    One way to help ensure kids start the day ready to learn is to ensure they get a good breakfast. This morning bright and early at 7.30 am I joined with staff and children at Wesley Primary’s breakfast club. The club runs Monday to Thursday and attracts between 25 and 40 children each day. For parents having real trouble making ends meet and for those families where both parents leave early in the morning for work, often on low wages, the club really helps. The club is organised by teacher aid Kathy Welch and teachers, student teachers, principal Rae Parkin and others all help out. Fonterra provide the milk and weetbix and locally Abe’s Bagels send a box of bagels weekly. It’s a positive beginning to the day, organised by a school really committed to ensuring no child misses out on a good start each morning as well as in life generally.

    http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.396603947061633.93908.118228171565880&type=1

    You know what, if you don’t want our stinking ‘Tory charity’ then stop asking for more.

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  20. MH (558 comments) says:

    Solo parent to child @ 4pm “did you bring home my lunch for tomorrow”
    whack
    tell your teacher I’m coming in to see her tomorrow
    whack

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  21. burt (7,083 comments) says:

    This is starting to sound like something Winston Peters is famous for…. making it all up as he goes along !

    Remember that Labour denied we had an “underclass” in NZ in 2007 – National were going to address it – they have not. Now Labour want to address it – seems to me opposition should be running government as politicians only have balls when they personally have nothing to loose.

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  22. BlairM (2,265 comments) says:

    Oh God help us, if there is one thing that frustrates me with the National Party, it’s this sort of crap. Instead of opposing something because it is wrong, they would rather point out the opposition’s hypocrisy on the issue when they supported the idea in opposition themselves. Quite how this is supposed to get votes I am not sure. A dumb idea is a dumb idea. National do not get points for supporting dumb ideas and saying that Labour flip flopped on the dumb idea. They get points for opposing the dumb idea because it is wrong.

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  23. Kevin (1,122 comments) says:

    Agreed. What a parade of desperate public purse suckers on Campbell live tonight trying to save the defunct idea of “child poverty”

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  24. LabourDoesntWork (278 comments) says:

    Another band-aid to hide ever greater social irresponsibility in our progressive utopia. Despite zillions already spent by the welfare state to lift people out of poverty.

    “We should measure welfare’s success by how many people leave welfare, not by how many are added.” Ronald Reagan

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