One good stunt deserves another

October 12th, 2012 at 2:05 pm by David Farrar

Today’s “” conference organised by Party affiliate member was of course a media stunt. I did however expect they would have pre-arranged something of substance to merge from it, but instead it is just another stunt – an inquiry by Labour, and into the manufacturing sector. This inquiry will of course shock horror conclude that their policies to increase prices and inflation are what NZ needs.

I’m glad Labour, Greens and NZ First are all working together to support a policy of printing more money.

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15 Responses to “One good stunt deserves another”

  1. anonymouse (705 comments) says:

    And that opposition banking enquiry in 2009 achieved soooo much…

    I mean can’t the Nats, ACT and Peter Dunne actually vote to stop parliamentary resources being wasted on such farce,

    I see the ” enquiry” has already grabbed an @parliament.govt.nz email address for submissions…

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  2. kowtow (8,938 comments) says:

    A cunning array of stunts as opposed to Labour being a stunning array of #unts.

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  3. Cunningham (846 comments) says:

    This is a gift for National! They should be able to mall the opposition over this reckless and stupid proposal. I especially want to see them do so leading up to the next election.

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  4. m@tt (636 comments) says:

    Yeah to right, bet they can’t even come up with anything as stunningly effective as a cycleway…
    They should leave it to people who really know how to stage a stunt.

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  5. Bevan (3,232 comments) says:

    Yes, and when the Axis of Stupidity (TM) come out with their ‘findings’ – National need to be ready with examples of how those policies are going to affect the rest of the nations non-manufacturing workers.

    They need to remind voters the policy’s of the AOS will drive up the price of petrol, bread, milk, etc. Fight them with things the average family can understand.

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  6. Bed Rater (239 comments) says:

    A media stunt posing as a “jobs summit” that’s a first.

    Oh wait, no it’s not.

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  7. Bevan (3,232 comments) says:

    Ah, I see Lord Haw Haw has arrived.

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  8. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    I’m glad Labour, Greens and NZ First are all working together to support a policy of printing more money

    as is currently being practised by such ‘basket cases’ (according to our illustrious blogger host) as the UK, the US, the ECB, and Switzerland, amongst many others, some of whom are simply unwilling to stand by like stunned mullets and watch their export sectors eroded by the currency wars.

    Meanwhile, National has been, by implication, outed as economically luddite by none other than the IMF:

    http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/11/a-global-1937/

    Remember, folks, the so-called zero budget is austerity by any definition, and the unholy rush return to surpluses and to pay down debt in an era of record low interest rates in the midst of the Lesser Depression is stunning in its ignorance.

    People should also download the IMF’s Oct 2012 Fiscal Monitor report. Amongst other insights, it sings the praises of progressive taxation, warns of the damage caused by puntive reforms of welfare, including unemployment benefits, and advocates massive expansion of childcare subsidies for working mothers.

    All in all, it’s quite a stunning (sorry, but it seems to be the word of the day) philosophical rethink by a body generally, and perhaps now formerly, considered to be the enemy of the 99%.

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  9. JC (950 comments) says:

    Assuming that DPF, Whaleoil, Lindsay Mitchell are right that manufacturing job losses are right in their quotations of the various Govt stats that show there has been bugger all loss of manufacturing jobs from 2008.. I went another way..

    I had a look at the Dept of Labour returns from unions about union membership.

    In 2007 manufacturing unions had a membership of 69580.. in 2012 that had fallen to 55459.. a fall of near 40%..so there really is a “crisis” in manufacturing.. union membership, no wonder the opposition parties are having conniptions.

    http://www.dol.govt.nz/er/starting/unions/Union-membership-2007.pdf
    http://www.dol.govt.nz/er/starting/unions/registration/UnionMembershipNumbers2012.pdf

    JC

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  10. orewa1 (410 comments) says:

    A good move that the public should willingly carry the cost for. There should also be enquiries into the reduced number of jobs for blacksmiths, telegram delivery boys, and locomotive firemen.

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  11. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    JC

    The truth is that manufacturing has been hollowed out and many thousands of secure, well-paying jobs that used to exist either simply don’t exist anymore or have been replaced by temporary, minimum wage jobs, and conditions reduced in every negotiating round.

    Who would want to start up an export company these days? Sure, hitech may still work, although even that is now in question, but your average manufacturer who marries machines, people and demand are a dying breed.

    I would prefer to see a more thorough analysis than the simplistic spin of DPF and the government that would unpack the statistics to show how, as a percentage of the labour market, manufacturing has declined. Our society still does need relatively low skilled jobs, or jobs where learning-by-doing is a valid and valued pathway to the future for school leavers who like making things, keep up with the population of that sector.

    I am in manufacturing. I know the spin from the abovementioned quarters is crap.

    And there is nothing dishonourable in import substitution made possible by a properly valued exchange.

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  12. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    And this is an article the government should be taking a hard look at:

    http://ftalphaville.ft.com/2012/10/11/1205021/the-imf-game-changer/

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  13. Kimbo (1,243 comments) says:

    @ Luc Hansen

    “The truth is that manufacturing has been hollowed out and many thousands of secure, well-paying jobs that used to exist either simply don’t exist anymore or have been replaced by temporary, minimum wage jobs, and conditions reduced in every negotiating round”.

    Oxymoron alert!

    The truth is, if those thousands of jobs were indeed “secure”, they wouldn’t/couldn’t be replaced. I find it difficult to understand how someone who insists they are “in manufacturing” fails to see there is nothing “secure” if a business can’t turn a profit by standing on its own feet, free of something as insecure and fickle as political tax-payer-funded patronage.

    “Our society still does need relatively low skilled jobs, or jobs where learning-by-doing is a valid and valued pathway to the future for school leavers who like making things, keep up with the population of that sector. ”

    Unless they are hitech, they belong in the developing third world – where they have been inevitably gravitating for decades. Which is good, because they will then be less dependent on foreign aid.

    I don’t make the rules, I just report them. It is Canute-like to ultimately try and stop it. As Muldoon found out…

    But there is still a place for the low-skilled in NZ, who are in that situation whether by choice or unavoidable circimstance – in service jobs.

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  14. Luc Hansen (4,573 comments) says:

    Thank you, Kimble. Of course, I should have inserted the word ‘formerly’ before the word ‘secure’, just for the literalists out there.

    And I agree that hollowing out our export sector (except for the natural resources sector, which is why we increasingly resemble victims of the Dutch Disease) does help the developing world but the problem with that situation is that it is win-lose. While the under-development of the developing world can be traced back to Columbus and the resultant genocide of Native Americans, north and south, we can formulate policies where development of the developing world does not necessitate the former imperialists to be de-developed. That’s win-win.

    To address your last point, sure, the final refuge is in service, a la Victorian England, but that doesn’t help our current account deficit, which is one of the reasons our dollar is overvalued, according to most Very Serious People, as Paul Krugman puts it.

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  15. Kimbo (1,243 comments) says:

    “While the under-development of the developing world can be traced back to Columbus and the resultant genocide of Native Americans, north and south, we can formulate policies where development of the developing world does not necessitate the former imperialists to be de-developed. That’s win-win”.

    Wrong. It is already happening, and it is win-win already, without the need for your “formulating policies”. It is the individual and collective expression of human nature in economic form, know as “the market” for short-hand. I sense that using that phrase may have an effect on you similar to wearing garlic cologne to a vampires’ ball, but hey, when you splash around loaded phrases such as “under-development…traced back to Columbus and the resultant genocide”, I plead innocent to starting the ideological war.

    I also note that your belated attempt to inject the phrase “formerly” still avoids the issue that if those jobs were truly “secure”, then they should still exist irrespective of state subsidies and protection. But then I guess pointing out the logical flaw no doubt reinforces in your mind my literalist tendencies.

    “The last refuge is in service, a la Victorian England”.

    My, you are arrogant and condescending to those who work in that noble industry, which, like any trade brings honour to those who perform it with diligence. I’ve worked in the service industry, and it provided me with skills and knowledge that are transferable to other professions and vocations as I’ve developed my CV.

    Either way, the fact you can’t even show sufficient respect to use my chosen moniker confirms in my mind you are a smug arrogant troll. Usually I’d refrain from that sort of statement and continue to try and play the ball. However, in your case, I’ll make an exception, and pass on by as your failure to meaningfully engage suggests you are simply interested in a self-satisfied mental wank.

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