Tracking Offenders

November 12th, 2012 at 12:00 pm by David Farrar

Audrey Young at NZ Herald reports:

Dangerous repeat violent offenders and sex offenders could be monitored for the rest of their lives after release from prison, says Police and Corrections Minister .

She wants to develop a comprehensive management scheme similar to one run in Britain and says a law allowing it could be passed by the 2014 election. …

Mrs Tolley returned last week from visiting the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements group (Mappa) in London.

It monitors about 58,000 registered offenders who are deemed to pose a serious risk of harm to the public on their release.

“They do a risk analysis of them and keep track of them essentially for the rest of their lives,” she said.

At a minimum, the offenders were required to register once a year.

Not a great burden.

Officials kept track of their address, job, family relationships and other things depending on the individual.

The officials kept an eye on their propensity for offending again but also worked with them to help them find another job if they lost one, or find housing.

Mrs Tolley said she was worried that once repeat offenders finished their parole or supervision orders they went out into the community.

“Take someone like Stewart Wilson – he’s on parole and then he is on an extended supervision order for 10 years, which is a really close monitoring of him, but at the end of that period he is finished and we just walk away.”

She hoped that because Wilson was older, his opportunities for reoffending would be few, “but there are some younger ones who will just disappear out into the community”.

Asked about civil liberties concerns, she said most offenders found it helpful to have that sort of structure in their lives “and know if something goes wrong, there is someone keeping track of them and they are not on their own out in the community”.

Sounds a worthwhile initiative if it can reduce reoffending rates.

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15 Responses to “Tracking Offenders”

  1. Kea (13,359 comments) says:

    Giving this sort of power to the government is more of a risk to society than the offenders are.

    It is a step in the wrong direction.

    I suspect reason will be thrown out, in favour of emotional hysteria over “sex offenders”, which the government will exploit to further errode our rights as individuals.

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  2. RRM (10,026 comments) says:

    Kea 12:11pm is correct… how much do we want to normalise government monitoring and control of people?

    But TBH in this particular matter I can’t get too upset about the civil liberties of convicted thugs being curtailed.

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  3. krazykiwi (9,186 comments) says:

    Tracking? Nah, just have Phillip Schofield put a list in front of the camera. The public will do the rest :)

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  4. Kea (13,359 comments) says:

    RRM, it is not black & white, but I don’t like where this is all heading. Who decides what is dangerous and who should be monitored? Its an easy sell when you are talking about kiddy fiddlers, but they will extend those powers once they have them.

    By far the biggest threat to the people is the government and the “authorities”, not random violence from private citizens. A quick check of any news paper, or history book, will confirm that fact. Every large scale abuse of human rights has been carried out by the “authorities” along with all major wars.

    Most people have no idea how to evaluate risk.

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  5. tristanb (1,127 comments) says:

    It only seems to “erode the rights” of sex offenders and violent offenders (decided by the fact they have a conviction). And I don’t really give a shit about their rights.

    I don’t see anything about keeping track of normal citizens.

    The main problem is that it will probably not do anything, and may be a waste of money. These people are so useless they need a babysitter to stop them doing what most of us would never contemplate. Perhaps they should be kept in some sort of secure facility, with locked doors and small rooms (we could call them cells). Then we could monitor them 24/7 more efficiently without the same transport costs.

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  6. East Wellington Superhero (1,151 comments) says:

    What causes sex-offenders?

    I’m not an expert and I’m sure there are a few causes, but I bet you that not have a father figure in your life and have a confused view of sexuality are big contributors. Free-loving has failed and now we’re gearing up to embrace gay-loving and the manifold confusion therein.

    Awesome.

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  7. RRM (10,026 comments) says:

    EWS –

    I don’t think you can blame the gays for this. Statistically, 100% of sex offenders are the children of one man & one woman… ;-)

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  8. Kea (13,359 comments) says:

    “I don’t see anything about keeping track of normal citizens.”

    Not yet you don’t. The people behind this idea are playing on your emotions with talk about “sex offenders”. Once the law, and systems, are in place it will be extended. I am not suggesting those behind the idea have a hidden agenda, but others will come later who will have different ideas. The government power will build incrementally to go well beyound pedos and violent thugs.

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  9. East Wellington Superhero (1,151 comments) says:

    No, I’m not blaming gays. Don’t reframe my comment. I’m saying the sexuality has become utterly confused.

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  10. RRM (10,026 comments) says:

    Sorry, for some reason I thought you were blaming the gays…

    East Wellington Superhero (1,122) Says:
    I bet you that not have a father figure in your life and have a confused view of sexuality are big contributors. Free-loving has failed and now we’re gearing up to embrace gay-loving and the manifold confusion therein.

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  11. Kea (13,359 comments) says:

    now we’re gearing up to embrace gay-loving and the manifold confusion therein.

    What are you “confused” about ?

    Do you really need government to tell you if you like COCK or not ?

    I don’t.

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  12. Keeping Stock (10,436 comments) says:

    @ RRM – when it comes to a contest between the rights of convicted sex offenders and the rights of their next potential victim, it really is no contest. Deep down, I think that even the civil libertarians would understand that if they were honest.

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  13. Minnie1972 (42 comments) says:

    I understand that there are already a small number of recidivist sex offenders (paedophiles, I believe) who are already tracked 24/07 as part of their parole conditions – remember, serious criminal offenders may be life parolees.

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  14. slean_81 (1 comment) says:

    This is somehow a good idea to keep track of the sex offenders whereabouts to make sure that they won’t do the same thing over again. Though we can say that it is not the right thing to do because even they are registered as sex offenders they also have the right to live their lives privately. And as a parents, it is our responsibility to keep our children safe. So I thought of looking for a safety protection for my daughter. And thanks to my sister who introduce me with this safety application from safekidzone. This is application is a life saving tool that works on mobile phones. It can easily get help in times of real emergency. I can now protect my son even I’m not with him. Check this out: http://safekidzone.com

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  15. questions (208 comments) says:

    In other news, it’s been a really bad week for National.

    Will check back later to see if anything comes from this…

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