Education Results

December 19th, 2012 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

The IEA’s Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study has some interesting results.

Maths

 

Singapore, Korea and Hong Kong are tops, all over 600. The midpoint is 500 and NZ is 486. Bottom is Yemen on 248.

Science

 

Korea, Singapore, and Finland are tops, all over 570. The midpoint is 500 and NZ is 497. Bottom is Yemen on 209.

Reading

 

Hong Kong, Russia and Finland are tops, all over 568. The midpoint is 500 and NZ is 531. Bottom is Morocco on 310.

The graphs are worth looking at, because they show the distribution for each country also. You can also see the results for 2001 and 2006 as well as 2011.

 

Tags: ,

25 Responses to “Education Results”

  1. Andrei (2,429 comments) says:

    We get beaten because the kids in those countries that out perform us get iPads in their cradles?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. RightNow (6,337 comments) says:

    International Standards?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. kiwigunner (184 comments) says:

    So? This is exactly what teachers et al told you when this whole National Standards debacle began. It is replicated all over the western world. Schools focus has turned to a very narrow view which in turn is demotivating to children and provides a 1920′s style education. We will plummet alright but it is what you all wanted, and what we warned you about. In fact almost every educational and assessment expert in NZ said exactly this – but then what would they know eh?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. ben (2,385 comments) says:

    NZ’s world class education system? Was someone being ironic?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Mark (1,301 comments) says:

    Given the huge variation between these results and PISA which of them is reliable?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Elaycee (4,064 comments) says:

    Yup – this should debunk the oft professed crap from the likes of the NZEI that our education standards are somehow, ‘world class’.

    If you aim to be mediocre, you’ll achieve it every time…..

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Nigel Kearney (747 comments) says:

    >Given the huge variation between these results and PISA which of them is reliable?

    The one where the countries at the top are actually successful and have a high standard of living.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. thor42 (764 comments) says:

    @Kiwigunner –
    National standards? BULLSHIT.
    You’re expecting us to believe that this has all happened in the last 4 years, since the Nats have been in government? Yeah, right – Tui ad coming right up.

    This kind of mediocrity has been in our education system for DECADES.

    For a start, we STUPIDLY dropped teaching reading via phonics and jumped on the useless “whole language” bandwagon.
    (Dame Marie Clay has an awful lot to answer for there – the BITCH).
    Phonics **works** – look at the demand that the late Doris Ferry had for her reading classes. The same goes for Graham Crawshaw –
    http://pc.blogspot.co.nz/2012/08/graham-crawshaw-1931-2012.html

    The useless softcocks in the Education ministry keep on with “whole language” even though it was discredited decades ago.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. kiwigunner (184 comments) says:

    Well, in short yes. If you get a chance look at the scores from previous years and see the trends. But not just them it’s true – all of the bullshit attacks on education over the last 4 years have also contributed. One example is the rabid focus on documentation such as Charters and Annual Reports over actual learning. But you may be a teacher or academic and know better?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. gravedodger (1,426 comments) says:

    How did we come in Te Reo, Kapa Haka and truancy.

    May be we should focus on the real stuff.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. Chuck Bird (4,402 comments) says:

    I wonder what mark Binnie the ninny would get. We do not need any help from activists judges from Canada or elsewhere.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. thor42 (764 comments) says:

    @gravedodger – that’s about it, too….. :)

    Yeah – the kids will know “te Tiriti” upside-down and back-to-front, but they won’t be able to do simple arithmetic.

    Gee – *we’ve* got our priorities right – not.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. BeaB (1,945 comments) says:

    Kiwigunner
    I love your logic – we used to have a world class system until when then considering we have had charters (a Labour innovation) for two decades!

    The fact is our top kids do well but the rest are falling behind. Our teachers may work hard and mean well but we are not the fabulous education system the teacher unions always claim.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. Bob R (1,250 comments) says:

    ***The fact is our top kids do well but the rest are falling behind. Our teachers may work hard and mean well but we are not the fabulous education system the teacher unions always claim.***

    1. To do a proper comparison you need to compare how students of East Asian ancestry do compared to the Singapore, Hong Kong & Korean scores, the Europeans with European countries etc. For example, people say the US school system is poor, but when you adjust for ethnic background you see they are actually pretty good. The East Asian students there outperform East Asian students in East Asia.

    http://super-economy.blogspot.co.nz/2010/12/amazing-truth-about-pisa-scores-usa.html

    ****Korea, Singapore, and Finland are tops, all over 570. The midpoint is 500 and NZ is 497. Bottom is Yemen on 209.***

    2. Sadly the countries with the best scores have below replacement rate fertility while the worst performers like Yemen have the highest. In short, the world population is getting dumber.

    http://www.globalhealthfacts.org/data/topic/map.aspx?ind=87

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. dave (985 comments) says:

    So we *have* got worse overall since National Standards came in. Who would have thought. Below the mid point in both Maths and Science. But apparently we are doing okay in Te Reo, compared with Greece and Italy.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. Dave Stringer (182 comments) says:

    Read across the row for a country to compare performance with the countries listed along the top of the chart. The symbols indicate whether the average achievement of the country in the row is significantly lower than that of the comparison country, significantly higher than that of the comparison country, or if there is no statistically significant difference between the average achievement of the two countries.

    Croatia is the only country on this page where our ‘average’ achievement is without statistically significanr difference. On all the others we are significantly lower than that of the comparison country. Another point to note is that we have one of the biggest spreads between highest and lowest achievement – suggesting that we do not have consistency of teaching.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. Dave Stringer (182 comments) says:

    Sorry, that’s on page 44 of the report!
    I meant that to be in the body of the earlier post.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. mpledger (428 comments) says:

    Mark said:
    Given the huge variation between these results and PISA which of them is reliable?
    ~~~

    My understanding is that TIMMS tests more learned knowledge while PISA tests more how to apply it (besides TIMSS being Maths and science and PISA being English and Maths IIRC). IIRC TIMMS tests for stuff not in our curriculum (and we do stuff that TIMMS doesn’t test for).

    Also, NZ kids are some of the youngest to take it i.e. the average age of the class has to be at least 9.5 to do the test and my daughter’s class must have been pretty close to that (she was about 9.25 years when she did TIMMS).

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. mpledger (428 comments) says:

    BeaB said:
    The fact is our top kids do well but the rest are falling behind. Our teachers may work hard and mean well but we are not the fabulous education system the teacher unions always claim.
    ~~~

    There appear to be two ways in which the top countries do well – Asian – more time spent learning in school and in learning centres, more rote learning, highly competitive, very heavy consequences if the student fails. Finland – huge respect for teachers, well paid teachers, well qualified teachers, equity of access and less time at school.

    Which one do you want for our kids?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. thor42 (764 comments) says:

    @mpledger – “Which one do you want for our kids?”

    I much prefer the Finland approach. The problem is – the teacher unions won’t allow it. They hate pay-for-performance and they hate charter schools.

    They hate *anything* that could interrupt their cosy little fiefdom.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. kiwigunner (184 comments) says:

    No it’s not the Charters it is that they have become along with Annual reports and National Standards data the main focus and the overwhelming concern of the Ministry and increasingly schools over the last four years. What you focus on leads the learning – good luck when this stuff is the be all and end all in schools now.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. wreck1080 (3,522 comments) says:

    Regardless, it does not seem the koreans are making the big scientific breakthroughs. Am I wrong?

    It still seems to be mainly in Europe/USA that the big science is happening.

    Creativity is very important to science — while you can learn strict analytical methods by rote, it is more difficult to teach creative thinking.

    I think western cultures have a good balance.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. krazykiwi (9,188 comments) says:

    Another point to note is that we have one of the biggest spreads between highest and lowest achievement – suggesting that we do not have consistency of teaching.

    Not quite. Of course there is a spread of teacher capabilities, but that’s not the main issue. Mrs kk spends quite a bit of time working with teachers around NZ, usually where their school is struggling with poor student achievement. She visits schools from across the decile spectrum 1 thru 10. Her view is that parental belief in the value of education, and their ongoing engagement with their child’s learning journey are the more significant factors in seeing lifted performance.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. SPC (4,634 comments) says:

    One thing that is notable is how a few countries have made some good progress – such as Portugal.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. BigFish (131 comments) says:

    @ thor42 (350) Says:
    December 19th, 2012 at 8:42 pm
    ” I much prefer the Finland approach. The problem is – the teacher unions won’t allow it. They hate pay-for-performance and they hate charter schools.

    They hate *anything* that could interrupt their cosy little fiefdom.”

    Charter (private) schools are rare in Finland and almost impossible to open. Almost all of their schools (teaching around 97% of students) are run by local government.
    Class sizes are around 20 – and the kids get fed for free.
    Teachers are fully unionised, have to have a Masters degree and get similar pay to other professions there in general (high salaried professions aren’t that common). They follow a set curriculum but can choose what books and methods they use to teach it. Pay is performance based on a bonus basis in addition to salary. So the teachers are pretty autonomous, so are the schools.
    Selective admission and tuition fees are prohibited even in private schools and homework is rare. There are no national examinations or rankings of schools. And things like student laptops aren’t common. Interesting.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.