No Speaker Tau

December 8th, 2012 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Claire Trevett at NZ Herald writes:

National MP has indicated he has given up on the race to be the next , claiming the “scaredy cats” had broken a promise to support his bid.

Mr Henare announced he intended to run for the Speaker’s position on Twitter in September – and yesterday he again turned to Twitter to send a signal he was about to end his campaign.

Their support was key. If all the opposition parties and the Maori Party vote together, then they have 60 votes. If Tau voted for himself he could have become Speaker by 61 votes to 60.

His tactics were bold and somewhat unprecedented. I doubt there ever has been a Speaker elected who didn’t receive a single vote from any of their party colleagues. It would have been a huge defeat for National to have a Speaker elected whom they did not support.

Not that I personally have any issues with Tau as Speaker. He’s funny and feisty and would throw Trevor and Winston out a lot – which has to be a plus.

However, Mr Henare was optimistic and had lobbied hard until yesterday when he tweeted that the Maori Party had now reneged on an undertaking to support him, which he said was critical to his decision to run in the first place.

“All I can say is maybe someone should start another Maori Party, maybe one that doesn’t renege on deals. Scaredy cats,” he tweeted.

He said he had that agreement in writing “and they still turned tail”.

I imagine they received some indication of how (un)successful their 2013 budget bids would be, if they voted for Tau.

Actually I don’t know what happened, but the reality in politics is government survive on trust and co-operation. The Maori Party probably worked out that humiliating the Government by electing a Speaker not supported by the Government (as far as I know no modern Speaker has ever been elected against the will of the Government) would seriously damage their relationships with Ministers and the Prime Minister.

The Maori Party co-leaders could not be contacted last night. Their support is unlikely to have been enough to get Mr Henare the job even with Labour’s support. The Speaker is voted on by Parliament and it is understood Henare was trying to persuade some of National’s caucus that they did not need to vote along party lines to try to make up the numbers he needed.

Labour MP Trevor Mallard said Labour had not yet decided who it would support for Speaker. Asked whether he had given any undertaking to Mr Henare, he said “I told him if we made a difference to the numbers, I’d take it to caucus”.

That would have been a fascinating discussion.

On Twitter, Mr Mallard had another job suggestion for Mr Henare, observing Mr Henare’s old job was up for grabs again – as deputy leader of NZ First.

Heh. They can hardly pick someone worse than the former deputy – Peter Brown!

Tags: , ,

18 Responses to “No Speaker Tau”

  1. Manolo (13,590 comments) says:

    Few people care about what happens to Henare, the waka jumper. He’s home as Labour lite MP.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. bringbackdemocracy (426 comments) says:

    Who was the idiot who told him the speaker got paid more?
    Trough Trough

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. iMP (2,366 comments) says:

    Oh right, Tau Henare as Speaker and Paul Henry as Chief Censor.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Viking2 (11,417 comments) says:

    You could try John ( I didn’t Know who donated) Banks. Now that would be funny.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Lockwood Smith is doing a good job as Speaker. Can anyone tell me why he should be replaced?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Rex Widerstrom (5,349 comments) says:

    Agreed mikenmild. Unfortunately he’s being tipped for a nice cushy diplomatic job, London I believe.

    Time for National to pass a law declaring him Speaker for Life… he’s undoubtedly the best I’ve seen in the role in some 30+ years of observation.

    If he has to go, Tau wouldn’t have been a bad choice. It takes a brawler to subdue a brawler, and as DPF says some of the more unruly MPs would suddenly find they’d met their match. And I’d have applied for a popcorn stand concession in Molesworth St :-D

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. David Garrett (7,112 comments) says:

    Rex: I agree. Absolutely superb. The first in living memory – or perhaps just the first to actually require Ministers to make some reasonable fist of answering the question. Very fair, and sharp as a tack too. And one helluva nice guy in person.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Why does Smith have to be sent to London? What’s stopping him from staying in a more important and prestigious job here? We only send useless no-names off to London, don’t we?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. Manolo (13,590 comments) says:

    I agree with you, comrade mike. It’s jobs for the boys Labour lite-style.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Johnboy (16,077 comments) says:

    Perhaps Brendon should give it a go?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Here’s list of our distinguished representatives in London over the past 50 years.
    Sir Thomas Lachlan MacDonald
    Sir Denis Blundell
    Sir Terence McCombs
    Hugh Watt
    Sir Douglas Carter
    Les Gandar
    Bill Young
    Joe Walding
    Bryce Harland
    George Gair
    John Collinge
    Richard Grant
    Paul East
    Russell Marshall
    Jonathan Hunt
    Derek Leask

    Some definite shining lights there.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. Johnboy (16,077 comments) says:

    But Jonathon did wonders for the NZ House wine cellar you must admit milkey! :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Did he drink it all or stock it up at our expense?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. Rex Widerstrom (5,349 comments) says:

    @mikenmild:

    That’s a fascinating list. I’d forgotten that such luminaries as Les Gandar and Joe Walding represented our interests if the UK. When you compare their achievements while in the post with those of career diplomats like Bryce Harland (who did much to preserve New Zealand’s primary produce markets in Britain despite it joining the EEC, and was also our first Ambassador to China, from 1973 to 1975 and New Zealand’s permanent representative to the United Nations from 1982 to 1985) and even the present incumbent, you see the inadvisability of making it a political appointment.

    The NZ High Commissioner to the UK can actually positively advance NZ’s interests if he (or she) sees the job as something beyond a platinum-plated long service leave entitlement granted in return for a lacklustre career as a politician.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    It has been very rare for our representative in London to be a professional diplomat. Who needs them when you have a half-distinguished party hack to pay off with a few years in the big smoke?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. Manolo (13,590 comments) says:

    The NZ High Commissioner to the UK can actually positively advance NZ’s interests if he (or she) sees the job as something beyond a platinum-plated long service leave entitlement granted in return for a lacklustre career as a politician.

    Tell just that to Smile-and-wave Key.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. Scott1 (528 comments) says:

    Well then… what can we do to get governments to advertise and have reasonably fair (as far as it can be) selection processes for our overseas diplomatic posts?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Well Scott, that would involve stronger backing for John Allen’s attempts to reform the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.