Q+A – Sunday, March 17 @9am on TV ONE

March 15th, 2013 at 10:44 pm by Kokila Patel

On Q+A this Sunday, NZ’s in the midst of a drought so how will it affect you and me and our pockets? We speak to the Finance Minister Bill English, and a climate scientist who says we have to no option but to adapt.

Also on the programme, is New Zealand set to become a world leader in energy? We speak to visiting economic geologist Dr Scott Tinker.

And the Catholic Church has a new Pope, we hear the view of a Kiwi Catholic.

On the panel this week is political scientist Dr Raymond Miller, former Greens co-leader Jeanette Fitzsimons, and Tower Investments’ CEO Sam Stubbs.

Join host Susan Wood and political editor Corin Dann on Q+A at 9am this Sunday on TV One.

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15 Responses to “Q+A – Sunday, March 17 @9am on TV ONE”

  1. HC (154 comments) says:

    I will be happy to join Corin Dann, but not Sue Wood head.

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  2. SPC (5,619 comments) says:

    Poplars and willows for shade and (branch leaves for food) and water storage and maybe some irrigation for North Island farms.

    PS The farmers solidarity in helping each other out rather than seeing the other as a competitor is notable, so why cannot they respect that same ethos amongst teachers?

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  3. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    we’ve never had a drought before?

    Crikey, I’ve lived through exciting times , the moon landings, a millenium and a drought, awesome.

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  4. Pete George (23,559 comments) says:

    Plenty of regional droughts, but I don’t know if we’ve had one this widespread before in modern times.

    There was a major drought in Central Otago in 1973 just after I left school. I worked all summer on an orchard. The only day I had off I went to the Omakau races but they were cancelled due to rain. I could and did work every other day including a half day on 25th December. Our irrigation water supply dried up completely, the only time I can remember that happening. It was dry even for a normally dry region.

    But I was a reclusive country boy and have no idea how the rest of the country was then.

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  5. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    Recent examples of drought around New Zealand

    From the NIWA website. Question if 2008 was the worst in the waikato in a century, how can the current one be the worst in 70 years?

    More hyperbolic bullshit from the media

    2010 – The worst drought in Northland in 60 years occurred when record low rainfall levels were recorded between Nov 2009 and April 2010. Instead of the 748mm which fell during the previous year, only 253 mm fell, leading to parched soils, significantly reduced pasture growth, and decreased farm productivity.
    2008 – Much of New Zealand encountered very dry conditions at the start of 2008, with the Waikato experiencing its driest January in a century. Severe moisture deficits continued throughout the north island until April/May, with the estimated cost to agriculture exceeding $1 billion, and an 11% fall in sheep numbers.
    2007 – Low rainfall and significant soil moisture deficits persisted throughout summer and autumn with record low rainfall totals occurring in many northern and eastern areas. This resulted in a severe shortage of feed for livestock, and lower than normal spring lambing and beef numbers, costing more than $500 million.

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  6. Simon (719 comments) says:

    a climate scientist, wouldn’t have an income unless he was peddling his computer modeling nonsense to statist clowns.

    “we have to no option but to adapt”

    Cretin, his taxpayer funded income should be stripped off him and given back to the productive.

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  7. tvb (4,416 comments) says:

    One beautiful dry summer after a very wet one we have climate scientists saying this is the pattern for the future. How could they possibly know that. Anyhow any one who farms expecting rain every 2 weeks or so and overstocks expecting that deserves to go out of business. We have had 2 months of dry weather. Great may it continue.

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  8. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    James Renwick, a climate scientist at Victoria University of Wellington, said New Zealanders should expect more summers like the current one due to global warming

    http://news.msn.com/world/new-zealand-declares-largest-drought-in-30-years

    I thought it was now called climate change because people like Renwick had trouble explaining why England was under snow for 6 months.

    I cannot find any stats for drought, all all can find is “perhaps the driest” ” the driest in living memory” but no information that confirms anything prior to 2008

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  9. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    The grape growers are having a boomer year, the hot spell has slowed PSA infection in the kiwifruit so there is an upside.
    One for the dairy farmers.

    Whats the difference betwen a puppy and a cow cockie?

    A puppy will eventually grow up and stop whining

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  10. OneTrack (3,088 comments) says:

    “is New Zealand set to become a world leader in energy?” – ah, no. I don’t think people will pay much for the phone number of the chinese companies that supply most of the wind turbines (and the neodymium that goes into them)

    And lots of other countries have geothermal and hydro technology – that’s probably where we bought ours.

    Just because someone (Russel) wishes it so, will not make it happen. But he will be able to throw a shed load of other peoples money at it. Solyndra, any one?

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  11. ChardonnayGuy (1,206 comments) says:

    Thank goodness, someone normal on the panel this week instead of Wishart. What was that about?

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  12. Jimbob (641 comments) says:

    In the Wairarapa in the ’77-’78 drought it didn’t rain from the end of October to the end of April. Every farmer was buying supplements for their cattle. The only green spots was where springs that were still going. It was worse than this year.
    Please would climate scientists stop peddling their wares and tell the true story.

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  13. hinamanu (2,352 comments) says:

    Is anyone going to bring up the fact farmers are not allowed to store rain water to anticipate drought.

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  14. emmess (1,428 comments) says:

    I don’t know what droughts have to do with global warming anyway.
    All thing equal, if it is getting hotter, it would mean more precipitation.
    Remember, the driest continent is Antarctica.

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  15. SPC (5,619 comments) says:

    Pauleastbay

    Clearly you don’t work with information or its analysis. There is nothing inconsistent in the media reports, they just reported the facts each year.

    2013 – driest in over 70 years (worse than 2010).
    2010 – driest “November to April” in 60 years.
    2008 – driest JANUARY in a century.
    2007 – a drought.

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