The flapjack police

March 28th, 2013 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

The BBC reports:

A school’s decision to ban triangular flapjacks after a pupil was hurt has been labelled “half-baked” by the Health and Safety Executive.

It follows an incident at Castle View School in Canvey Island, Essex, when a boy was hit in the face by a flapjack.

Catering staff at the school have been told only to serve square or rectangular flapjacks.

The school said the “isolated accident” had led to a review of “the texture and shape of the flapjacks” provided.

Words fail me.

A spokesman for the Health and Safety Executive said: “We often come across half-baked decisions taken in the name of health and safety, but this one takes the biscuit.

“The real issue isn’t what shape the flapjacks are, but the fact that pupils are throwing them at each other – and that’s a matter of discipline, and has got nothing to do with health and safety as we know it.

“We’re happy to make clear that flapjacks of all shapes and sizes continue to have our full backing.”

Good that in this case the regulator is the one with common sense, and it is the school that is over-reacting.

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11 Responses to “The flapjack police”

  1. kowtow (7,653 comments) says:

    Thanks to progressives common sense is long dead in the UK and dying in much of the rest of it.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/terrorism-in-the-uk/9956799/Government-loses-latest-bid-to-deport-Abu-Qatada.html

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  2. Dave Stringer (183 comments) says:

    Totally unbelievabubble!

    Can you imagine what would happen if someone’s foot was trodden on (by accident of course)? They’d ban shoes and make everyone move around on their bums! The mind boggles, these terribubble people need to be taught a lesson in humanity – mind you, they’re probably perfect parents, I know I was before I had kids!

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  3. Reid (15,981 comments) says:

    Yes it’s a bit of a pity we’re in the process of setting up a brand new bureaucracy to do over here precisely what the “Health and Safety Executive” does in the UK.

    Of course it clearly makes a huge amount a sense to create an entire new dept with all the commensurate trappings from new buildings to new IT systems to new internal operating units like HR and “Corporate” and everything a brand new dept will require, especially considering it already has all these things up and running perfectly well courtesy of the infrastructure provided by the whole MBIE corporate environment which has just finished absorbing the old Dept of Labour into its anatomy.

    But hey. Simply being a part of a behemoth dept isn’t politically high profile enough at all, esp when H&S is such a prominent media issue at the mo. Why people might think the politicians didn’t care, and we can’t have that so let’s spend absolutely squillions of our money setting up the agency as a stand-alone dept to take the heat off us and make people really really realise that actually we do care. And we’re spending lots and lots of your money in the middle of a financial crisis, to show how much we do.

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  4. nasska (10,696 comments) says:

    ….”Good that in this case the regulator is the one with common sense,”…..

    It was immediately obvious that this happened outside of NZ. Our wanking OSH inspectors would close the school.

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  5. Kea (11,878 comments) says:

    This is the direct result of the feminisation of Western culture. Women are natural born worrying controling micro managing fuss pots. They are behind all of this sort of thing.

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  6. tvb (4,210 comments) says:

    I shudder to think what might happen if a boy had died and what recommendation we would get from a Coroner on the size shape and texture of flap jacks.

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  7. Judith (7,688 comments) says:

    I am sure the appropriate amount of research was undertaken. Perhaps children see triangles as more like ‘play things’ than they do squares and don’t associate the shape with its intended purpose?

    Similar phenomenon to men and busty blondes!

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  8. scrubone (3,050 comments) says:

    Inability to reason soundly seems to be a common thread in policy decisions today.

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  9. Mary Rose (393 comments) says:

    I suspect it’s because the UK, like the US, has developed a ‘compensation culture,’ where anyone who falls over their own feet tries to make money out of it by suing someone.
    Quick search finds, for e.g.:
    ‘Teachers frequently regard a parent as a potential litigator.”
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/9530139/The-compensation-culture-is-poisoning-our-society.html

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  10. UglyTruth (4,028 comments) says:

    Inability to reason soundly seems to be a common thread in policy decisions today.

    Reason is the life of the common law, and common law is anathema for the state.

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  11. James Stephenson (2,040 comments) says:

    Flapjacks? What is the world coming to? When I was at school we managed to make some reasonably effective throwing stars in the metalwork shop…

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