Education at a glance

June 26th, 2013 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

The has published its 2013 Education at a glance book of OECD educational statistics. The report has around 400 tables in it.

Ministers Parata and Joyce highlight NZ is :

  • Investing 7.3 per cent of its GDP in – the seventh highest in the OECD
  • Investing 20 per cent of all public expenditure in education, which is the second highest percentage in the OECD
  • In the top third of countries for participation in early childhood education  – 95 per cent of four year olds enrolled in 2011
  • In the top seven countries for the percentage of public expenditure allocated to early childhood education
  • In the top 10 of the OECD for the highest proportion of tertiary qualified adults, with 39 per cent of 25 to 64 year-olds and 47 per cent of 25 to 34 year-olds in New Zealand having a diploma or higher qualification
  • Increasing significantly the number of 15 to 19 year olds enrolled in study –81.5 per cent in 2011, up from 74 per cent in 2008

So let no one say the issue for education is not enough money being spent by taxpayers.

 

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12 Responses to “Education at a glance”

  1. flipper (4,328 comments) says:

    The only downside would be expenditure on a centralised, computer driven pay system, would it not?
    But hang on.
    Didn’t Novagarbage get signed off by labour and Hipkins? :)

    A really excellent report card.

    But we must not tell it like it is.
    It might offend the sensibilities of poor performing nations…just like our national standards and league tables upset hypersensitive teacher unions. :)

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  2. Redbaiter (10,398 comments) says:

    “So let no one say the issue for education is not enough money being spent by taxpayers.”

    Damn right, the issue is left wing teachers trying to run education to their own political means.

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  3. mandk (1,030 comments) says:

    @ flipper,
    excellent is going too far, but it’s not bad

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  4. flipper (4,328 comments) says:

    Mandk…
    OK.
    What very good?

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  5. Harriet (5,200 comments) says:

    “….Education at a glance….and……So let no one say the issue for education is not enough money being spent by taxpayers.”

    Damn right.

    But Maori whinge whinge…… :cool:

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  6. Right of way is Way of Right (883 comments) says:

    Wait, what, you mean we ARE spending enough? So the problems didn’t go away because we threw money at it for years? Hmm, interesting!

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  7. mandk (1,030 comments) says:

    flipper
    The OECD report is about inputs and outputs.
    I think outcomes (e.g. productivity, universal functional literacy and numeracy) are more important.
    So, the inputs and some of the outputs look pretty good, but the outcomes are mixed.

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  8. doggone7 (846 comments) says:

    Redbaiter
    “So let no one say the issue for education is not enough money being spent by taxpayers.”

    “Damn right, the issue is left wing teachers trying to run education to their own political means.”

    Go into your local schools and ask them what the issues are. If you get the the chance secrete microphones in the staff rooms.

    When you listen in over a long period of time you will hear them talking about whatever they talk about. They’ll obviously be talking about the issues. You’ll find what they talk about is what they told you were the issues. Get back to us about what those issues are.

    My bet is they won’t be about union stuff and political stuff. They’ll be on about the kids with the ratbag behaviour, the bullies, the underachievers, the the kids who’ve had some success, the new opportunities they’re going to provide. And they’ll be talking about what they’re going to do about those things.

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  9. flipper (4,328 comments) says:

    mandk (257) Says:

    June 26th, 2013 at 11:49 am
    ……
    Can’t and don’t argue about that. And yes, the outcome picture is mixed, nay many would say, it obscured by political static.

    But your point, well made, is about the under-lying reasons for national standards is it not?

    The teacher union position is virtual identical to that ion USA and YUK. Only in Australia, where Gillard dealt to the unions, is thre any real emphasis on outcomes.

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  10. Redbaiter (10,398 comments) says:

    “My bet is they won’t be about union stuff and political stuff.”

    Of course not, because they all agree on that part of it. Leftism is the default position among those who work in education, and if it isn’t they won’t last long.

    You only have to look at the curriculum or codes of conduct of any government school to see how astonishingly bad it is.

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  11. doggone7 (846 comments) says:

    Redbaiter

    So the the NZ curriculum is astonishingly bad? So the “codes of conduct” are astonishingly bad?

    If leftism is the default position those in education why is that?

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  12. joegarlick (1 comment) says:

    I have no idea if those stats mean the rest of the OECD is not spending enough or if NZ are spending an adequate amount now or we spent too much in the past. Depends on what metrics you value. As my girlfriend is a qualified ECE teacher I do know for a fact that most teaching staff in ECE centers used to be qualified teachers and now under the current govt this is no longer the case due to cuts in funding.

    So Mr Joyce says: “Quality early learning is about creating the best start in life for as many children as possible, as soon as possible, and I am delighted these figures from the OECD reflect this.”

    when in reality he actually means:

    “Q̶u̶a̶l̶i̶t̶y̶ [E]arly learning is about creating the b̶e̶s̶t̶ [most cost effective] start in life for as MANY children as possible, as soon as possible, and I am delighted these figures from the OECD [look good on the surface while actually reflecting a lowering of the quality of teaching]”

    More kids being taught by less qualified teachers in larger classrooms – good stuff.

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