Morsi ousted

July 4th, 2013 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

The Washington Post reports:

The Egyptian military removed President Mohamed Morsi from power Wednesday and suspended the constitution in moves it said were aimed at resolving the country’s debilitating political crisis.

In a televised address to the nation after a meeting with a group of civilian political and religious leaders, the head of the powerful armed forces, Gen. Abdel Fatah al-Sissi, said the chief of ’s constitutional court “will assume the presidency” on an interim basis until a new presidential election is held. Sissi said the interim president will have the right to declare laws during the transitional period.

I have mixed feelings on this. I am no fan of Morsi, but I don’t see that he had done anything recently to require military intervention. There was no civil war, there were no human right abuses. There were just protests against him.

It’s good that the military will hold new elections, but what happens if the people elect Morsi again, or someone else the military do not like?

Hopefully Mohamed ElBaradei will win a fair election, as he looks to be the best bet for a Government that is tolerant and relatively secular.

Tags:

40 Responses to “Morsi ousted”

  1. MT_Tinman (3,249 comments) says:

    destabilization of the Arab states in favour of Muslim extremism continues.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. PaulL (6,038 comments) says:

    I’m not a great fan of Morsi, like you DPF. But he was elected. I’d also agree that ElBaradei would be better from my viewpoint, but I’m not a voter in Egypt. So I’m pretty sure my view is irrelevant. I suspect many in the world have views on American elections, but they don’t get taken into account either. Probably nobody has an opinion on NZ elections though. :-)

    In short, I may like the outcome here in terms of my preferred president, but I’m definitely against the precedent of the military getting to depose presidents they don’t like. This shouldn’t have happened. But….going the next step….other than being disapproving of it, I don’t support anyone taking action to try to stop it from having happened. It is an internal Egyptian matter.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    The human rights violations under Morsi were worse than the previous regime. Obama knew this, but continued to support the brutal Muslim Brotherhood regardless. Obama’s support, and the human rights violations of those he supports, are well reported and easily sourced.

    I am pleased to see how quickly the Egyptians have risen up against an oppressive Obama backed fundamentalist Muslim regime and demanded a free and secular society.

    It might also send a message to the war monger in Washington, though I suspect he will not hear it over his ego.

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Linda Reid (416 comments) says:

    Yeah, Christians being killed and their churches burned is not a human rights violation. /s

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. MT_Tinman (3,249 comments) says:

    Linda Reid (365) Says:
    July 4th, 2013 at 2:19 pm
    Yeah, Christians being killed and their churches burned is not a human rights violation. /s

    Hey, we agree. ;-)

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Alan Johnstone (1,087 comments) says:

    Of course there were human rights abuses, he leads an Islamist administration. It’s what they do.

    People should remember that just because someone is democratically elected, it doesn’t make them a democrat.

    Hitler came to power through democratic means after all….

    Vote: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. CHFR (234 comments) says:

    Egypt is fantastic DPF is you are not a Coptic Christian still we all know how you feel about Christians so maybe they just don’t count.

    [DPF: Tell me how I feel about Christians please. This should be enlightening]

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    Linda Reid, yes the Christians were singled out. Also there were many killings and people punished for blasphemy and all the usual Muslim extremist stuff.

    Here is part of Obama’s response to the human rights violations:

    US gives 4 more F-16 fighter jets to Egyptian government despite outcry

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/04/11/us-gives-4-more-f-16-fighter-jets-to-egyptian-government/#ixzz2Y2WQnDxL

    Vote: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    People should remember that just because someone is democratically elected…

    Lets just put that myth to bed.

    It is not a free and democratic election when Obama chooses the candidates.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. RRM (10,001 comments) says:

    The democratic election of an islamist ideologue is not anything to cheer.

    (But I don’t know much about that country, maybe that’s the best of a bunch of bad alternatives?)

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. PaulL (6,038 comments) says:

    Obama chose the candidates for the Egyptian election? Wow. I never knew he had that much power. I would have thought he had difficulty choosing his underwear in the morning, but that’s probably just me.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. infused (658 comments) says:

    He hand’t done anything.

    He needed to go. Muslim brotherhood? No thanks.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. PaulL (6,038 comments) says:

    @RRM: the fact that they had an election is cause to cheer. The fact that they elected an islamist is not surprising – they are a Muslim country, and they’ve been denied the ability to learn by experience that ideologues don’t make good presidents. So long as that ideologue doesn’t monopolise power and stop the next election from being fair, then my expectation would have been that Egyptians would work out for themselves they don’t like it, and instead of someone else telling them what’s good for them, they could make their own minds up.

    Of course, many in Egypt might actually like what they’re getting with Morsi. Which we could have found out with an election. A coup, not so clear, and just creates a set of grievances and division. Those who support Morsi might now turn to terrorism against “the system” that did their guy out of the top job.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    PaulL, yeah it is just you. You do not need to subscribe to any wild conspiracy theory. You just need to follow current affairs, and I do not mean reading Stuff and watching the news at 6.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. RightNow (6,995 comments) says:

    http://www.hrw.org/news/2013/07/03/egypt-epidemic-sexual-violence

    You can’t fend off a pack of wild animals by citing your human rights.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Kea (5,666) Says:
    July 4th, 2013 at 2:29 pm

    Lets just put that myth to bed.

    It is not a free and democratic election when Obama chooses the candidates.

    What is your evidence for this?

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Kea (5,666) Says:
    July 4th, 2013 at 2:27 pm

    US gives 4 more F-16 fighter jets to Egyptian government despite outcry

    One presumes that the fighter jets are in the hands of the military… the same people who just ousted Morsi.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    Weihana, I am really getting tired of your laziness. You need to make, at least some, effort to inform yourself about issues you question me on.

    Obama is not going to allow anyone to gain power he does not approve of. It is a self evident fact. He had his dirty fingers in all the “Arab Spring” power grabs by the radical jihadists. He is doing it right now in Syria. Are you seriously going to suggest that after all that effort he will let the people choose any leader they want ? You are dreaming. The majority of Syrians would prefer stable government under Assad, though they may prefer a better leader. What the people do not want is an imported bunch of radical Muslim jihadists running their country. But guess who Obama is supporting ?

    It is incredibly naive to think Obama is motivated by democracy and human rights. That is bullshit and you know it. He is great mates with some terrible despots and oppressive regimes all over the world. Get it through your head, Obama is not the great hope for the future and has made everything worse. He has not done anything he promised and has demonstrated the very worse aspects of US foreign policy.

    I used to feel for our buddies in the US and how Obama tricked them. But when he was voted in a second time, that sympathy was lost. They deserve all they get for allowing this idiot back into office.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. lastmanstanding (1,300 comments) says:

    Typical of the WOGS. Total shambles total instability. No concept of good governance. Hell sounds like the Socialist Party Gweens NZ 1 and Mana

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. MT_Tinman (3,249 comments) says:

    Kea, idiot Obama is not – he got himself elected twice.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    Weihana, yes you assume correctly. The military does have the jets. Did you work that out by yourself ?

    Do a bit more study and you will find that the military is usually controlled by the countries government. It was the government Obama gave the extra jets to. Or do you think all the various government agencies are separate countries or something ?

    The people did not like Morsi, the military did not like Morsi, the only friend poor old Morsi has is some warlord wanna-be in Washington.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    MT_Tinman , good point. Actually it is not Obama that pisses me off, it is the people who support him, or more specifically their double standards and ignorance.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Kea (5,667) Says:
    July 4th, 2013 at 2:50 pm

    Weihana, I am really getting tired of your laziness. You need to make, at least some, effort to inform yourself about issues you question me on.

    That I do not take your assertions at face value does not imply laziness.

    Obama is not going to allow anyone to gain power he does not approve of. It is a self evident fact.

    It is not self-evident.

    He had his dirty fingers in all the “Arab Spring” power grabs by the radical jihadists.

    A broad assertion which does not prove your original claim.

    He is doing it right now in Syria.

    Syria and Egypt are two different countries.

    Are you seriously going to suggest that after all that effort he will let the people choose any leader they want ?

    No, I am asking you for evidence of your assertion.

    The majority of Syrians would prefer stable government under Assad, though they may prefer a better leader.

    Syria is not Egypt.

    It is incredibly naive to think Obama is motivated by democracy and human rights. That is bullshit and you know it.

    It is not something that I have claimed.

    He is great mates with some terrible despots and oppressive regimes all over the world.

    Which does not prove that he chose the candidates for the Egyptian election.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. PaulL (6,038 comments) says:

    Kea, no disagreement that Obama was the wrong choice. If the republicans had stood a candidate who could beat him that would have helped though.

    But that doesn’t automatically transfer into Obama having enough influence to pick candidates. I’m struggling with how you connect those two facts together.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Kea (5,669) Says: July 4th, 2013 at 2:56 pm

    Do a bit more study and you will find that the military is usually controlled by the countries government.

    But in this particular case it is not which undermines your argument that by doing so it is an endorsement of Morsi over any other candidate. The United States has military relations with countries all over the world. It does not necessarily imply any particular involvement in the local politics.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    Weihana, you know what I am saying, smart arse ;)

    I simply wish the US would stay out of other peoples business. Their various interventions have all been a disaster. They have launched war and destruction all over the globe, as well as sowing the seeds of discontent in other places. It has cost trillions of dollars and many American lives, as well as many more innocent people.

    What have they got to show for this ? Nothing except decreased global security and a massive debt. It is all an epic fail. If they actually achieved some good, then I might say the end justifies the means. But that is not the case and things are much worse under Obama.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 3 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    PaulL , re picking candidates.

    I think you misunderstood me. I was not referring to US candidates. I was talking about the candidates who stand after Obama backed regimes grab power in other countries.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. Weihana (4,583 comments) says:

    Kea,

    I agree with most of what you are saying. :)

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    Weihana, I know you do, you shit stirrer ;)

    You must remember that my ancestors have had extensive dealings with black Africans and that may give me an advantage. We achieved full employment, often on various large scale civil engineering projects, and got them building something more than mud huts, as well as reading and writing. Of course unions were not big back then, nor was health & safety, they were also a bit light on human rights, so maybe that is why Obama is fucking over all those North African and Middle Eastern countries :)

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. All_on_Red (1,643 comments) says:

    Morsi might have been elected but he wasn’t elected so he could then change the Constitution in favour of what the Muslim Brotherhood wants. Similar problem in Turkey.But people aren’t just protesting about that. The economy is appalling. The cost of fuel for cooking and transport is huge. I think they import about 60% of their food, which is ironic considering their agricultural history. Its ridiculous. Add in the thuggery which comes with a corrupt system further fuelled up by religious fanatics and it aint no wonder no ones happy.

    And I agree with what a lot of Kea says. Obama’s a disaster its going to take the US 10 years to recover from. I guess if you are a superpower then meddling in favour of your interests is to be expected but he is really useless at it.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. Kea (13,328 comments) says:

    I just heard a news report that claimed the protests against Morsi were the biggest in human history !

    Obama’s media friends will be working overtime to help distance him from this mess. But the fact is Obama supported a fundamentalist Muslim regime with an appalling human rights record, giving them 1.5 Billion in aid, plus military jets and other goodies. He has blood on his hands. If he wants to accept the accolades, when things are going ok, then he must also accept responsibility for the failures.

    The sick thing is, Obama is doing the same thing in Syria right now, with his support for the radical Islamists trying to overthrow a secular government and install sharia law.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. Sequel (14 comments) says:

    My understanding was that Morsi was elected by the majority of the people, but that the majority wasn’t that big – only a matter of a few per cent. Fine, you may say, he won the election (which he did). However, in an unstable democracy where a group almost as big as your supporters oppose you, you should walk softly and not try to do things that piss large groups off, like introducing forms of Islamic law that big swathes of the population disagree with.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  33. OneTrack (3,216 comments) says:

    So is the verdict that the Arab Spring was a waste of time in Egypt and they should have just cut out the middleman, saved a few lives and stuck with Mubarak?

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  34. JC (968 comments) says:

    You can make a strong argument that the people had little choice. . they are close to starvation, their biggest money spinner of tourism is virtually dead and Saudi Arabia refused to support the MB.

    The MB had run out of money, food costs are huge (in no small part because of corn being turned into ethanol) and no one wants to lend or donate the roughly $20 billion per year to keep the country fed and running.

    With the army in control the Saudis are much more likely to lend or donate money, same for the World Bank and other organisations. With the MB gone there might be hope for the tourist industry and perhaps other ventures.

    Its very important the military bring the Copts back onside, they have the money and skills Egypt desperately needs.. but this could be politically difficult with the Islamists just as desperate to marginalise non Muslims.

    Right now the military is the least worst choice and probably all that stands between a desperate food crisis, a fully imploded economy and an internal bloodbath.

    JC

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  35. joana (1,983 comments) says:

    No human rights abuses…What about all the torture? and the persecution of Christians and out of favour Muslim sects?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  36. nasska (11,779 comments) says:

    What this situation needs is for the atheists & Godless to stand back & let the religious leaders introduce the love of their deities to the hearts of the people. Only those with God’s love in their hearts can break through the hatred & cruelty secular life brings..

    Oh wait…..tried that…..didn’t work. :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  37. SPC (5,770 comments) says:

    DPF, the real issue is whether the military will allow the MB to stand candidates, the arrest of MB leaders is indicative of a return to exclusion of the MB from elections.

    A more circumspect course would have been a referendum on Morsi continuing as President.

    The crisis was cause by the agenda of the MB to become the institution of government, build a one party state (a religious version of the secular Baath Party regimes). This is why Morsi would call criticism an insult, to connect respect for his leadership to respect for the prophet (he who cannot be insulted).

    The MB strategy was to follow the path of the governing party in Turkey (Erdogan now talks of local opposition coming from the usurers – alternative to western Judeo-Christians as a way to marginalise political opposition as enemies of the Moslem nation state), but it seems to have over reached itself. It needed to be successful in economic terms before making the moves to secure its continuing place in government. An irony as its initial popularity came from its work providing economic help to the poor.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  38. SPC (5,770 comments) says:

    http://www.stratfor.com/analysis/egypts-atypical-military-coup?utm_source=freelist-f&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20130703&utm_term=RedAlert&utm_content=readmore&elq=29b3e085892e4080b075dd9f6eee2dce

    http://www.stratfor.com/analysis/egypt-military-coup-bodes-ill-future-stability?utm_source=freelist-f&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20130703&utm_term=RedAlert&utm_content=readmore&elq=140fff5abcdc4bf897392745f3c4f23a

    http://www.stratfor.com/analysis/egypt-persistent-issues-undermine-stability?utm_source=freelist-f&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20130704&utm_term=FreeReport&utm_content=readmore&elq=08b2b0dffce144389af670a84550e2e0

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  39. SPC (5,770 comments) says:

    http://www.stratfor.com/analysis/egypts-muslim-brotherhood-recovers-after-morsis-ouster?utm_source=freelist-f&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=20130704&utm_term=RedAlert&utm_content=readmore&elq=d5fcc7b545ed49348f53b52a4c767f1a

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  40. Dave Mann (1,248 comments) says:

    @JC(776)
    Thanks for your erudite analysis: you write as if you know the country well (or have read about it intellgently). I particularly agree that right now the military is the country’s ‘least worst choice’.

    I think the MB probably won the elections because they were the only faction with any organisation and the country rushed into ‘democracy for democracy’s sake’. I’m not sure that you can just switch on the democratic process in a country which has never experienced it and expect everything to turn out roses.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote