The Dotcom Party

September 2nd, 2013 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

Prime Minister John Key has dismissed as a stunt ’s plans to begin a political party.

The Herald on Sunday reported yesterday that the internet mogul was planning to start a political party with the aim of gaining the 5 per cent of the vote required to get into Parliament.

Dotcom told the paper “It is much too early to say anything about a new political party”, but later tweeted “My embryonic NZ political plans leaked by whistleblower. Still looking for partners. Not ready yet”.

I think it is a great idea to splinter the anti-Govt vote.

However Mr Dotcom may have overlooked one problem. He is ineligible to be an MP.

S47(1) of the Electoral Act states:

Regardless of anything in subsection (1), a person is not qualified to be a candidate or to be elected unless he or she is a New Zealand citizen.

In 2002 an MP was disqualified after it emerged she was not a citizen. Kelly Chal was provisionally elected on 2002 election night for United Future but then disqualified as a candidate and MP after they realised she was not a citizen.

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30 Responses to “The Dotcom Party”

  1. Redbaiter (8,032 comments) says:

    Of course Dotcom can start a party and run candidates without standing as one.

    I think its a good move for him to put some distance between himself and the far left vultures trying to make political hay from his predicament.

    After all, it is big government that is at the root of any spying on citizens, and the left are always for big (and bigger) government.

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  2. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    But…Winston is looming bigger and bigger and this cause will help him no end. I really believe this is a signal for NZ First

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/9115390/Petition-forces-state-owned-asset-sales-referendum

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  3. Brian Griffin (22 comments) says:

    From Jane Bowron, writing about replacing Bob Parker, but I think we get her drift. Lefty twaddle, no way the Right Honourable john Key is an imperialist lapdog. Not even comfortable with using that term lapdog, actually:

    I’d vote for the fat foreign defender of human rights at the drop of a hat, and am mightily sick of the smug nonchalant response by those who take freedom for granted, airily inviting the Five-Eyed Stasi to listen in on their phone conversations, monitor emails and bank accounts etc on the breezy pretext of “What have I got to hide?” with the added self- deprecatory codicil, “my life is so boring anyway, they’re welcome to listen to it”.

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    Good luck with that in an observation age when hindsight has sinister benefits, when whatever you say is open to several interpretations with no statute of limitations on the backlog of your supposedly innocent conversations.

    “I’d vote for the fat foreign defender of human rights at the drop of a hat, and am mightily sick of the smug nonchalant response by those who take freedom for granted, airily inviting the Five-Eyed Stasi to listen in on their phone conversations, monitor emails and bank accounts etc on the breezy pretext of “What have I got to hide?” with the added self- deprecatory codicil, “my life is so boring anyway, they’re welcome to listen to it”.

    Because of 9/11 when men resident in America, not in the Middle East, flew planes into buildings, we now accept that what happened to a fading superpower and their apocalyptic and neurotic response to it, should be visited upon this country, that we should accept the wholesale spying on us by invisible, supposedly fair-playing friends.

    So far our response to the insidious attack on our free thought has been roll-over pathetic, when we know in our hearts that the snoops are the real terrorists.”

    I’m disappointed by the citizenship thing, I’d been hoping to vote for a moderate Republican like that nice John McCain.

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  4. Colville (2,191 comments) says:

    What rhymes with stunt?

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  5. thor42 (971 comments) says:

    I wish this Dotcom scumbag would GTFO of the country.
    I am *sick to the back teeth* of hearing about him.

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  6. CJPhoto (218 comments) says:

    I dont think he ever said he would stand, just create a party.

    One does wonder why he just doesn’t put his (considerable) weight in behind the Pirate Party as I assume their policies would be quite similar: http://pirateparty.org.nz/

    Might not be so go for his PR (or his ego if it isn’t named after him!).

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  7. Brian Griffin (22 comments) says:

    Sorry, the edit option closed before I’d finished. Send some Ad Feedback though.

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  8. Redbaiter (8,032 comments) says:

    I’d vote for the fat foreign defender of human rights at the drop of a hat, and am mightily sick of the smug nonchalant response by those who take freedom for granted, airily inviting the Five-Eyed Stasi to listen in on their phone conversations, monitor emails and bank accounts etc on the breezy pretext of “What have I got to hide?” with the added self- deprecatory codicil, “my life is so boring anyway, they’re welcome to listen to it”.

    Well said.

    That so many on the so called “right” overlook this important perspective is symptomatic of the blurred political lines that exist here in NZ, where we have almost a one party state, and the two main parties are intermingled and their policies as muddled as hell.

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  9. OTGO (526 comments) says:

    Add him to this list then http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_parties_in_New_Zealand

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  10. Keeping Stock (10,181 comments) says:

    The Bill and Ben Party is one leader short, is it not? A Dotcom Party would be about as serious as that.

    What is more amazing however (or maybe that should be “more appalling” is the lack of knowledge by the media as to what the rules for candidates’ eligibility really are. Patrick Gower was on with Sean Plunket this morning, and when Plunket pointed out Dotcom’s ineligibility, made some comment about the “police being confused again”.

    There’s no confusion at all Paddy; if you are not a New Zealand citizen, you can’t stand for Parliament, even if you are large, German and wealthy. And there’s no way that Dotcom will pass the “good character” test whilst there are serious criminal charges hanging over him in the US :D

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  11. Elaycee (4,333 comments) says:

    For the life of me, I can’t understand why there is there such a media frenzy whenever this overhyped, convicted fraudster opens his mouth. Who really gives a stuff what he thinks about X or Y? His opinion is simply the voice of one and nothing more. Unfortunately, the MSM hasn’t yet woken up to the fact that their gushing and fawning is simply fuelling Dotcom’s rampant ego.

    Like thor42 (1.25pm) I look forward to Dotcom’s extradition proceedings being wrapped up and to then see his arse disappear down the air bridge into NZ6.

    Good riddance.

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  12. georgebolwing (686 comments) says:

    If Mr Schmitz (I continue to think that the name “dotcom” contravenes section 18 of the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration Act 1995) were to establish a political party and attempt to control it while being himself inegible for election would be a very interesting test of our political institutions. Russel Norman was co-leader of the Greens while not in Parliament, but both he and the party had always said that he would enter Parliament at the first available opportunity.

    Would Mr Schmitz seek to attend caucus meetings?

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  13. davidp (3,558 comments) says:

    It sounds like Dotcom plans to beat extradition by becoming a member of parliament. It’s the same strategy that rapist Julian Assange hopes might save his bacon, it kept Berlusconi out of jail for years, and half the Russian Duma are in parliament in order to save them from imprisonment. The lack of citizenship is a problem, but Labour passed special legislation (under urgency) in order to save one of their non-citizen MPs from being de-elected. I suspect we’ll see Dotcom on Labour or the Greens’ list, and his mates Robertson and Norman can sort out the citizenship issue with more special legislation.

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  14. ChardonnayGuy (1,187 comments) says:

    Why doesn’t Mr Dotcom join the Pirate Party? It sounds like an ideal vehicle and its cyberlibertarian philosophy seems compatible with his?

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  15. Brian Griffin (22 comments) says:

    Every time I heard people talking about Dotcom they seem to be over-opinionated but under-informed. You do know that most of the media just edit the releases they are given, right?

    It’s a shame the right are so naive in this country, but at least they are not all also bible-bashers like the US. I didn’t think “Wired” magazine was very far leaning either way politically – they have too much to lose from their intelligent readership – unlike some of our local rabble-rouser media, but here is an article many of you “Just read/heard the headline and formed an opinion based on what John Key said in a sound bite” whiners should read.

    http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2012/10/ff-kim-dotcom/all/

    Maybe that’s true. Or maybe we are trying to throw out a bloke that may be very different, but making legitimate money he could pay legitimate tax on.

    Notice how the US film industry Association were offered the chance to check that anything he was hosting was copyright , they could take it down, which none of the other cloud storage sites did. In response, the yanks made a big song and dance of busting him for the cameras, in a raid that was humiliating for NZ and smacked of banana republic diplomacy. John Key should have known better. A lot better.

    I reckon Key deserves the big German with the big brain making fun of him.

    Good thing the judiciary still has a few teeth left. I think they are meant to help govern, aren’t they?

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  16. RightNow (6,844 comments) says:

    The ass groove left in Horomia’s seat can only be filled by one man!

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  17. Ian McK (237 comments) says:

    This criminally insane obese slug must be deported. How can he expect to interfere, not only in our judicial system, but also politics, and get away with it. He has become a plaything for Labour/Greens, and “Snake Vance”; they should be held to account also.

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  18. Keeping Stock (10,181 comments) says:

    davidp said

    It sounds like Dotcom plans to beat extradition by becoming a member of parliament.

    He can’t do that David. He is NOT a New Zealand citizen, just a permanent resident. The Electoral Commission’s rules are absolutely explicit on that; no one can become an MP in New Zealand if they are not a NZ citizen. And he sure as eggs won’t be being handed citizenship whilst there are serious charges hanging over him for which he could and should be extradited.

    The best that Dotcom can do is bank-roll a party, but without being an MP himself, his impact on the political landscape would be miniscule.

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  19. Weihana (4,496 comments) says:

    Ian McK (61) Says:
    September 2nd, 2013 at 2:34 pm

    How can he expect to interfere, not only in our judicial system…

    Because he is entitled to due process.

    but also politics

    He is allowed an opinion also.

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  20. davidp (3,558 comments) says:

    Keeping Stock>He can’t do that David. He is NOT a New Zealand citizen, just a permanent resident.

    As I pointed out, this wasn’t a problem for Harry Duynhoven where Labour passed special legislation to overcome his citizenship issues. If you can pass a special law for Duynhoven, you can pass a special law for Dotcom.

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  21. davidp (3,558 comments) says:

    Brian griffin>Or maybe we are trying to throw out a bloke that may be very different, but making legitimate money he could pay legitimate tax on.

    We’re trying to throw out a bloke who has been convicted of serious crimes in at least two countries, is currently wanted by law enforcement in another country, had a pretty poor record of paying his staff in Germany, and thought that he could gain corrupt favours in return for campaign donations from a NZ MP. We don’t need dodgy criminal business people in the country, since we have enough of our own already.

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  22. Weihana (4,496 comments) says:

    davidp (2,898) Says:
    September 2nd, 2013 at 3:29 pm

    We’re trying to throw out a bloke who has been convicted of serious crimes in at least two countries, is currently wanted by law enforcement in another country, had a pretty poor record of paying his staff in Germany, and thought that he could gain corrupt favours in return for campaign donations from a NZ MP. We don’t need dodgy criminal business people in the country, since we have enough of our own already.

    Mostly irrelevant. The only question that is relevant is whether the extradition request meets the requirements of the Extradition Act. “We’re” not throwing out anyone. This is not a popularity contest, it’s one country making a request for extradition under our laws to be tested in court.

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  23. Redbaiter (8,032 comments) says:

    “It’s a shame the right are so naive in this country, but at least they are not all also bible-bashers like the US.”

    What the fuck’s that got to do with it.

    My observation is that so called “bible bashers” frequently have perceptions on liberty that are far superior to the infantile drivel that drips from the lips of obsessively focused secular progressives.

    The issue here is the over reach of big government and I’d say (for example) the Christian Sarah Palin would be far more helpful in this case than the secular pogressives, losers who have over the last few decades steadily built government into the overpowerful monolithic behemoth it is today.

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  24. Weihana (4,496 comments) says:

    davidp (2,898) Says:
    September 2nd, 2013 at 3:29 pm

    a bloke who has been convicted of serious crimes in at least two countries

    Also, on this question his crimes were declared to INZ and given the significance of his business activities and his wealth, it is a pretty strong case for a character waiver, and in any case is a decision that has already been rendered in his favour.

    Moreover, his “serious crimes” resulted both in suspended sentences according to Wikipedia.

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  25. dime (9,668 comments) says:

    Hope it happens! he can take 4% of the moron vote. that would be helpful!

    hell, go left and take a few off the gweens

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  26. duggledog (1,439 comments) says:

    He knows all about parties. He funds them with money he made off other people’s backs. Will be aligned with the left, politically

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  27. Keeping Stock (10,181 comments) says:

    davidp said

    As I pointed out, this wasn’t a problem for Harry Duynhoven where Labour passed special legislation to overcome his citizenship issues. If you can pass a special law for Duynhoven, you can pass a special law for Dotcom.

    I don’t think so David:

    1) Dotcom is not currently an MP, or a member of any party. I doubt that any proposed change to electoral law would get off the ground.

    2) Duynhoven made an genuine mistake, which had unforeseen consequences. It should not have been resolved in the manner that it was, but his circumstances are poles apart from those of Dotcom.

    3) Can you really imagine National supporting a law change to give Dotcom air-space?

    Personally, I would welcome a Dotcom Party. It would simply dilute the protest/nutter vote of the Left, and would be unlikely to do much harm to National. Those who support Dotcom’s crusade are more naturally found in Labour, the Greens and Mana, so anything that further fragments the Left should be welcomed with open arms.

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  28. davidp (3,558 comments) says:

    Keeping Stock>It would simply dilute the protest/nutter vote of the Left, and would be unlikely to do much harm to National. Those who support Dotcom’s crusade are more naturally found in Labour, the Greens and Mana, so anything that further fragments the Left should be welcomed with open arms.

    One thing that National has going for it is it looks coherent and well managed. The Left looks like a train wreck with the parties trying to out-nutter each other to canabalise a few percent of the vote from their potential coalition partners. For instance, I don’t think many Greens are racist, but they’re currently competing with NZ First for the anti-Chinese vote and looking like a cross between hippies and the Klan.

    Throw Dotcom in to the mix and you suddenly combine parties that want to stop foreigners buying houses with a foreigner who wants to buy a big house. You combine parties who are supposedly support workers with a man who used all sorts of scams to avoid paying his German employees. You combine a party that wants to pass lobbying legislation with a man who thought secret political donations could win him an easy time in prison. And you combine parties that want to subsidise musicians and hang out with them at awards events with a man who wanted to use stolen music to make himself a fortune. About the only thing they all share is anti-Americanism, and I doubt that is enough to unify the Weird Left.

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  29. Redbaiter (8,032 comments) says:

    Dotcom is not necessarily any kind of leftist. In fact, given that the over the top raid on his home and the illegal spying were the kind of acts that are historically typical of the left (bluecaps, brownshirts etc) I would be surprised if that is his position.

    He wants to stay in the country and Jiohn Key wants to throw him out. Dotcom needs political support in his ambition to stay here and where else is he going to get it but from the hard left. Given that John Key and Labour lite have assumed the position of the natural left.

    So I do not hold his political allegiances against him. He has been unfairly treated by bureaucrats and he has been betrayed by shifty John Banks. He has a case against the government that has some credibility. The government’s case is undermined by John Key’s seeking of Hollywood patronage.

    I am not going to join in the hate campaign against Kim Dotcom. I think he has some valid issues and has been treated poorly.

    His strategy is to bring some political pressure on National. If I was him I would seek some kind of allegiance and support from a party that already exists and has a chance to leverage some concessions from National. I think National are (sadly) anxious to maintain an allegiance with Maori and have been selling the rest of NZ down the tube to do this. Therefore a good option for Dotcom may be to check out 1LAW4All.

    They need money. They need publicity. They have the capacity to attract a lot of votes if they can get out there. They could end up having a serious effect on National’s relationship with the Maori Party and thereby National’s hold on power. Maybe Dotcom could check out 1LAW4ALL and see what opportunities exist there. Some of them are Libertarians. They should therefore support Dotcom.

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  30. Nostalgia-NZ (5,045 comments) says:

    One interesting point to me is that it seems that most of the people who were predicting Dotcom’s departure early this year are still underestimating him.

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