Police need to do better

November 20th, 2013 at 2:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

Senior did not closely watch a corrupt officer within their ranks after a woman accused him of indecency – because they knew nothing of her complaint.

Sources have told The Press that Gordon Stanley Meyer’s supervisors at Christchurch South police station were not told about the 2007 complaint until after his 2011 offending came to light.

Police National Headquarters said last night there were no “lawful grounds” to tell them about it.

This is bureaucratic nonsense. There may be no lawful grounds to discipline an officer over the earlier complaint, but that is very different from not noting it on his file, and ensuring his supervisors are aware of it.

The senior constable accepted an offer of oral sex to let a 23-year-old woman off a drink-driving charge in September 2011 and touched an 18-year-old’s breasts in a patrol car in April 2011.

After his guilty pleas, police revealed a woman made a complaint six years ago that Meyer indecently touched her in a public place, also while he was on duty.

Police investigated, but found there was insufficient evidence to prosecute or discipline Meyer.

Police Assistant Commissioner Grant Nicholls told Radio NZ that Meyer was not issued a warning over the 2007 complaint, nor was a monitoring programme put in place. “You would have thought he would have heeded the warning of the inquiry. Obviously he didn’t.”

You would have thought the Police would make a file note!

When asked why Meyer’s supervisors were not informed of the 2007 complaint, a police spokesman said: “Police are bound by the same laws as any other employer. In the absence of sufficient evidence in either the criminal or employment context police had no lawful grounds to take the measures … outlined.”

This is where the Police have it wrong. There is a difference between the level of proof needed to take action, and to inform supervisors.

The principal of the Northland school who didn’t tell anyone about the complaint about his deputy principal was castigated by everyone for his failure. The Police seem to be doing the same.

The 2007 Bazley report recommended that all relevant information to give a “complete picture of an officer’s full record of service” should be accessible to supervisors when making appointments, monitoring performance and investigating complaints.

A police spokesman said they had until 2017 to implement the recommendations.

They should get on with it.

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81 Responses to “Police need to do better”

  1. PaulL (5,969 comments) says:

    Hmm. A blowjob to get off a drink driving charge. I’m pretty sure I heard a fair number of stories about that sort of thing 20 years ago, and I doubt it’s changed.

    A lot of police officers are young males. Not many young males would turn down a blow job in return for looking the other way for an attractive young lady. (And a goodly number would do it for a less attractive young lady, so long as his mates didn’t find out).

    I realise that our police force should be incorruptible. But not sure it’s realistic to expect this one.

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  2. peterwn (3,194 comments) says:

    I am not sure that an employer can place a note with adverse implications on an employee’s file without going through some sort of disciplinary process. The employee would need to be made aware of the note and could ‘appeal’ its existence.

    However surely the officer’s immediate superior and more senior line managers of the police officer should have been made aware of the existence and nature of the complaint. A HR department is there to support line management, not supplant it.

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  3. dime (9,611 comments) says:

    “The senior constable accepted an offer of oral sex to let a 23-year-old woman off a drink-driving charge in September 2011″

    Hot

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  4. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Their antics over 25 years have led me to believe that the NZ Police are a bunch of con-artists who have hoodwinked a very gullible population into believing that they are “the good guys.” If you believe a word they say you are an ignorant fool.

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  5. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Regardless of the odd incident such as the Christchurch flasher in blue, we have got a pretty good police force compared with many, or even most, countries.

    One stupid thing our police do, though, is go after obviously law abiding citizens who have or use firearms for protection from criminals. IMHO, there are enough people in the community who hate them without alienating their natural supporters. (Some of the police haters emerge on Kiwiblog threads and will undoubtedly surface today).

    For example, old New Zealanders have been subjected to assault, rape, and murder in their homes, and now one of these people has been before the court for keeping a loaded rifle under his bed! Good on him, and if he used it on intruding thugs (he didn’t) that would be even better.

    The police have often targeted the law abiding when it comes to firearms. I’m thinking specifically of the Northland farmer who would have been bankrupted but for community support. His offence: firing a shotgun burglars who were stealing his petrol.

    I’m thinking of the Auckland gunshop owner’s son who was dragged through the courts for shooting a guy with a meat cleaver or similar who was obviously going to demand automatic rifles to go on a shooting spree.

    The latest case:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11160050

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  6. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “Regardless of the odd incident such as the Christchurch flasher in blue, we have got a pretty good police force compared with many, or even most, countries.”

    Conned or con-artist take your pick.

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  7. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    Police reputation is close to tatters after Roastbusters.

    Police procedure has to called intio question in every high level case From the Marlborough sounds to David Bain to Lundy.

    Very obvious police procedure is highly suspect and Arthur Allan Thomas was one of the first high profile convictions to suffer from fascist police tactics

    Lundy will walk as a direct result

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  8. rouppe (932 comments) says:

    You can’t put something on a personnel file just because there’s a complaint. Imagine the threats of, “promote me or I’ll make a sexual complaint that will end up on your personnel file”. Not just in Police, anywhere.

    I understand the desire to have some means of determining whether a pattern of behaviour emerges, but I’m not sure that’s it.

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  9. Manolo (13,514 comments) says:

    There are crooks and corrupt people in every organisation, except UnitedFuture.

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  10. rouppe (932 comments) says:

    Having said that here’s another example of a dog handler not in control of their dog.

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  11. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “There are crooks and corrupt people in every organisation, except UnitedFuture.”

    But very few organisations have the power of arrest and/or the perverse mentality to stitch up innocent people.

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  12. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Here we go again. It’s hard to have a discussion about police flaws without police haters like jackinabox emerging, and heads coming up supporting Bain and the funeral-performance champion Lundy.

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  13. MH (680 comments) says:

    it’s remarkable what passes as a breatherliser these days. Was she charged for offering a bribe,the whole thing leaves a nasty taste in the mouth.A policeman’s lot is not a happy one even with the ability to apply stand over tactics.

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  14. dime (9,611 comments) says:

    Jack – usually its people who have first hand experience in dealing with cops

    “i was innocent and the cops….”

    sure you were.. sure you were.

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  15. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Did you watch Campbell Live last night Jack5? Did you see how your chums in the police tried to stitch up an old chap for mailing a box of flies to parliament, and did you see how they had to pay the old gent 9,000 tax payer dollars to shut him up?
    It happens ALL THE TIME Jack5, the cops fucking things up, ruining peoples lives and costing the tax payer untold money in the process.

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  16. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Jackinabox (3.24 post) asks:

    Did you watch Campbell Live last night Jack5?

    No I didn’t. If I wanted to watch a chimpanzee tea party I’d go to the zoo.

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  17. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    No I didn’t. If I wanted to watch a chimpanzee tea party I’d go to the zoo.

    Fool.

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  18. MH (680 comments) says:

    in the mean time Fabian Mika found guilty of manslaughter is instructing his lawyer to have his sentence reduced by say 10% off because he is a disadvantaged person being Maori,which and how much of that blood line/physique is responsible for his actions is still to be sorted. He has MOBSTA inked onto his face. Soon we’ll have tribal discounts able to be exchanged for blanket redemptions and mommy promises to be good notes of good intentions.

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  19. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    What’s you game MH? This thread is about bent cops and their gullible supporters.

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  20. Nostalgia-NZ (5,004 comments) says:

    2 good points by DPF:

    ‘This is where the Police have it wrong. There is a difference between the level of proof needed to take action, and to inform supervisors.

    The principal of the Northland school who didn’t tell anyone about the complaint about his deputy principal was castigated by everyone for his failure. The Police seem to be doing the same.’

    In fact they are probably the same point, in both situations it looks like because nothing was recorded to file, there were further offences. It appears both ‘stumble’ over employment Law, I don’t think it was ever Parliament’s intention to let employment Law trump the criminal Law. Particularly where an alleged offender’s trail is being covered and allowing potential further offending because nothing is known or recorded about earlier similar events. I would have thought the standard of ‘avoiding covering tracks’ would be set higher in Government departments.

    Saw another example on the show on the weekend where the man was savaged by an police attack dog on his own property had substantial information about his complaint, and the consequences of his complaint with held from him.

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  21. MH (680 comments) says:

    Too much anti police talk. I was merely giving the Police oral support. She may well have been heavy handed and swallowed his pride prematurely and thereby destroyed any conceivable evidence rather than have it come out under gross examination or as part of a re-enactment.I have a picture in my mind about how it all unfolded.

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  22. Judith (8,243 comments) says:

    @ MH

    Just because they are police, are we not allowed to criticise when they abuse the privilege of their job?

    Being a police officer gives them no special immunity – as public servants they are expected to conduct themselves in a manner expected of their position. When they don’t, then as taxpayers we are entitled to question, and criticise them. Perhaps even more so, because the nature of their employment means they know the law better than most, and therefore are fully aware when they break it.

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  23. big bruv (13,526 comments) says:

    “The senior constable accepted an offer of oral sex to let a 23-year-old woman off a drink-driving charge in September 2011 ”

    Has the tart been charged with attempting to bribe a police officer?

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  24. MH (680 comments) says:

    she could also be had up for endangerment by knowingly imparting enough alcohol by mutual exchange to render him incapable of carrying out his sodom duty.Her dearilicktion may have caused him to drive erratically if not erotically.

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  25. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    LEST WE FORGET

    Prison sentence for cop in sex for traffic fines case

    17 December 2009

    A former police officer is going to prison for coercing a prostitute in Christchurch to have sex with him.

    In the High Court in Christchurch on Thursday, Justice French sentenced Nathan Connolly, 31, to a prison term of two years and said he would not be granted home detention.

    Then aged 28, Connelly was in a traffic unit when he coerced the woman into having sex with him in a patrol car instead of issuing her with $1000 worth of traffic fines.

    And he did not pay for sex with her for the next nine months.

    Justice French said the sentence must be severe enough to act as a deterrent as it is imperative the public has faith in the police.

    That last sentence is a killer.

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  26. KiwiGreg (3,211 comments) says:

    “No I didn’t. If I wanted to watch a chimpanzee tea party I’d go to the zoo.

    Fool.”

    Indeed; the chimpanzee tea parties ended in the early 70s. You’d be wasting your time going to see one now.

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  27. Rowan (1,962 comments) says:

    A small amount of police give the rest of the NZ police force a bad name, the individuals that do do in fact deserve it, the rest do not, the biggest idiot would be assistant commissioner Burgess at the top of the hierarchy, his performances probably give them a lousy reputation especially on occassions where they have got it wrong.

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  28. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    16 September 2006

    A woman assaulted by a police officer she met through the internet is warning other women to be aware of the risks.

    The 33-year-old mother of two was fresh from a violent relationship when she met Constable Andrew Rae from Christchurch through a dating website last year.

    But far from the protector she believed he would be, Rae ended up bashing her several times after moving into her house.

    He even punched her in the stomach a few days after she had abdominal surgery, and still had stitches. He would also practise his police holds on her tiny body.

    Rae quit the force in mid-March, several weeks before being charged over the attacks on her.

    He pleaded guilty in the Christchurch District Court this week to three charges of assaulting the woman.

    He was fined nearly $4000 – $500 for each charge, $390 court costs and $2000 reparation to his victim.

    The mother is speaking out to warn women to be careful letting men they meet online into their lives.

    “He was in a caring profession, but he abused that position of trust,” said the woman, who does not want to be named.

    “He totally controlled my life. He’s a predator and unfortunately, these types of men are using the internet to gain access to vulnerable women.”

    Rae did not want to comment. His lawyer, Jonathan Eaton, said Rae was under extreme pressure at the time of the acts, for reasons explained in court and suppressed by Judge Brian Callaghan.

    “The sentencing judge accepted that those pressures had led him to act in a manner that was quite out of character,” Eaton said.

    Police spokeswoman Maggie Leask said it was inappropriate for the police to comment.

    The woman began chatting to Rae through emails in April last year. They swapped phone numbers and agreed to meet. They hit it off in the first week and had a brief sexual relationship.

    In May last year he moved into her house as a flatmate for four months but Rae’s behaviour quickly changed, said the woman.

    “Within a few days of moving in he became very volatile. He started putting me down, saying things like, `you’re too skinny’,” she said.

    “He also started what he called play fighting, but I didn’t like it. I was ill and only 47kg at the time.”

    The woman said Rae would practise his police moves on her. When she resisted his play fighting, he would threaten her. “He said he could charge me with female assaults male and could have my daughter taken off me.”

    Once when Rae pinned her against the wall, she lashed out and scratched his back, drawing blood.

    “He punched me in the stomach with a closed fist and said ‘you f… bitch’.”

    Soon after, Rae handed the woman a yellow Women’s Refuge card, telling her she would need it shortly, she said.

    “It frightened me because I think he knew that he could be violent towards me in future,” she said.

    A few days after arriving home from abdominal surgery in August last year, Rae punched her in the stomach without warning.

    “He just lashed out. It wasn’t an angry punch. We hadn’t been arguing. I was standing, he was sitting at the table and he just punched me,” she said. “I said ‘I’ve just had surgery’ and he just said `sorry’.”

    The woman said she was scared of reporting the assaults to the police because of his threats and the fear she would not be believed.

    But the final straw was when Rae attacked her for accidentally breaking a statue, while her daughter was home.

    The daughter told her teacher at school what had happened.

    Rae was interviewed and charged by police, initially with five assault-related counts. He pleaded guilty this week to three of them.

    The woman said the police needed to improve their psychological screening of recruits.

    “His threats and comments like `do you know what they do to cops in prison?’ stopped me from calling the police for help,” she said.

    “Andrew stated that as I had a past, and because he was a police officer, he could do this. No one would believe me. He threatened to have me put under surveillance.”

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  29. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “A small amount of police give the rest of the NZ police force a bad name”

    That’s a good one Rowan.

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  30. MH (680 comments) says:

    can we at least forgive the senior constable who throttled a soccer referee? Thank goodness Cunliffe was never a constable a tongue twister like that would have got most crims off.

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  31. kowtow (7,877 comments) says:

    jackinabox

    What were you done for?

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  32. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    You are awful MH, but I like you!

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  33. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    kowtow (5,759) Says:
    November 20th, 2013 at 5:55 pm
    jackinabox

    What were you done for?

    Scrapbooking.

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  34. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    Once again the root of the problem lies with Labour. They were the morons that started allowing those of less integrity, size, and education into the force. Together, with their left-wing media mates, who attack police at any opportunity for bogus wrongdoings when dealing with drunken scum and losers, the good hard-nosed cops have deserted the force in droves, hence we are left with very few high-calibre officers. Their union is a joke, run by a Labour lackey, and they need some really good, hard men to get them back into a position of respect. So long as we have woofters like Norman and his mob going out of their way to denigrate them, we will not see any good recruits. The judiciary are also to blame with their namby pamby sentences for serious crimes, a legacy of one Geoffrey Palmer, who stated, “Don’t incarcerate, everyone has good in them, we must understand” . . . Yeh right!

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  35. Johnboy (15,460 comments) says:

    Well at least Cop’s are straight.

    None of the bastards have ever offered to let me off a speeding fine if I gave them a blow job! :)

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  36. duggledog (1,417 comments) says:

    Jackinabox

    Go out and roll with the Police for one night anywhere you like in the country – save Queenstown. It’s eye popping especially in South Auckland. Way worse than you might see on one of those reality shows where everything is edited down or out. You will see the appalling shit our boys and girls in blue have to deal with all day, every day.

    Being spat on, verbally abused, physically abused, you name it. All the time.

    So there’s one or two arse holes every now and then – show me any profession that doesn’t? Just one? Any one will do.

    If you are polite and respectful with the cops and you don’t have pages of prior convictions they are sweet as, waaay more lenient and casual than Aussie cops, U.S. cops – shit they don’t even carry guns!!

    I think, the problem is, nobody has any respect for authority any more, especially younger generations who have grown up without corporal punishment or any boundaries whatsoever. Just wait till Sue Bradford’s legislation bears its poisonous fruit in a few years’ time. And that lack of respect is going to manifest itself amongst some Police officers who will snap and beat some little c*** up or think to hell with it, I’m getting a blowie. I’m not condoning it but it’s bound to happen and I’m amazed 99.5% of them remain straight and true.

    I sometimes wish the entire Police force would go on strike for just one week – the whole lot of them. I’d be fine, but I bet a whole lot of people – including Jerkinabox – would be on their knees by Monday.

    IGM – I can’t think of many politicians who have done more damage to the fabric of the nation than Mr Palmer

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  37. Rowan (1,962 comments) says:

    Generally the police are trustworthy, if I was in need of their services I would trust them to do the task requested, however if I was falsely accused of commiting a crime I didn’t commit, then I don’t know if I would have confidence that I wouldn’t get stitched up by having guilt predetermined and the police selecting the evidence to fit the ‘guilty mindset’
    That to me is where the system gets it wrong and needs to do better.

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  38. Longknives (4,657 comments) says:

    “The senior constable accepted an offer of oral sex to let a 23-year-old woman off a drink-driving charge in September 2011 and touched ”

    ” The senior constable accepted an offer” is completely different to how it was initially reported in the media when this story broke..
    The breathless NZ media who are on a roll with their ‘roastbusters’/’all police are rapists’ theme at the moment made out the circumstances were quite different, and on more than one occasion intimated he had forced himself on this ‘innocent victim’…

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  39. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “I sometimes wish the entire Police force would go on strike for just one week – the whole lot of them. I’d be fine, but I bet a whole lot of people – including Jerkinabox – would be on their knees by Monday.”

    duggledog, your ignorance is exceeded only by your arrogance. Why would you be fine if the cops went on strike, armed to the teeth are you?

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  40. Judith (8,243 comments) says:

    @ Longknives (3,334) Says:
    November 20th, 2013 at 8:06 pm

    He accepted an offer, despite being on duty, being paid by tax money, and having made an oath to uphold the law, plus signing a ‘code of conduct’, he accepted an offer that contravened his contract. He also committed a crime by accepting the offer and ignoring the offending.

    There is nothing about what he did that was acceptable according to his professional status.

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  41. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Rowan (1,167) Says:
    November 20th, 2013 at 7:47 pm
    Generally the police are trustworthy, if I was in need of their services I would trust them to do the task requested

    “I used to trust the Police, but now I wouldn’t trust them two yards.” Guy Wallace.

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  42. Longknives (4,657 comments) says:

    “There is nothing about what he did that was acceptable according to his professional status.”

    Agree 100% Judith- And the guy has rightfully lost his job as a result..
    But that she ‘offered him a blowjob’ is certainly not how the media are reporting it though is it?

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  43. Judith (8,243 comments) says:

    @ duggledog (693) Says:
    November 20th, 2013 at 7:10 pm

    As a police officer, they are trained and are made fully aware of the sort of behaviour they will experience, not to mention the danger of their job. To argue that the attitude and conditions that they have to endure excuses any adverse and illegal behaviour by them is ridiculous. They are paid well for what they do, plus they make an informed decision and have plenty of opportunity to withdraw after training and before they become sworn officers and sign a contract. The vast majority do their job well, but the few, including the ‘rot at the top’ do not. Despite previous reports detecting problems within the force in certain areas, nothing has changed and its time it did.

    Making excuses will not fix the problem. They need to address the issues that continue to reflect poorly on the entire force, and on those decent police officers who do not deserve it.

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  44. Judith (8,243 comments) says:

    @ Longknives (3,337) Says:
    November 20th, 2013 at 8:43 pm

    Yes, well I hope they now go back and charge her with the original offence, maybe also a charge of soliciting?? although I don’t think that is a crime anymore?

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  45. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Well said Judith, but your words are wasted on dingledork.

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  46. Judith (8,243 comments) says:

    igm (80) Says:
    November 20th, 2013 at 6:57 pm

    Sorry but the problems in the force that have been recognised and reported over a couple of decades, have occurred in both National and Labour governments, neither of which appears to have made significant progress in preventing the same things reoccurring. My personal opinion is that these things will continue to occur as long as the ‘old guard’ – those trained back in the 70-90′s are in charge, they need to move on. It was during that period that many of the problems began to occur, mostly because of the recruitment and training of young people that required them to be isolated in an ‘inclusive’ manner, that provided a supportive environment, but made for a ethos that let them think the police were ‘ a law unto themselves’ and were legitimate in doing whatever they wanted, because everything remained within the ranks.

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  47. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “Sorry but the problems in the force that have been recognised and reported over a couple of decades, have occurred in both National and Labour governments, neither of which appears to have made significant progress in preventing the same things reoccurring.”

    “Immediately after the 1999 election Labour initiated a Select Committee inquiry, designed to destroy Jenny Shipley’s credibility.

    I learnt much from sitting on that enquiry. Once it was clear that Mrs Shipley was not implicated it became my first experience of Parliamentary bi-partisanship, as the committee grew increasingly appalled at the untrustworthiness of Police witnesses. No MP on that committee was unaffected. Most shattering was the simple stupidity at senior levels, in sticking to incredible denials in the face of overwhelming evidence, including video footage.

    The committee had no desire to destroy public confidence in Police integrity. We noted our unhappiness with their evidence and focused the report on protocols for preserving constitutional propriety. It appears from reports of the Wang affair that Police agreement on those might have been as unreliable as their evidence to the committee.”

    http://www.stephenfranks.co.nz/?p=109

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  48. UglyTruth (4,550 comments) says:

    I think, the problem is, nobody has any respect for authority any more, especially younger generations who have grown up without corporal punishment or any boundaries whatsoever.

    What authority?
    No, really, how do you tell the difference between true authority and a bunch of numpties who go around telling people that they are all special and sovereign and they get to make law?

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  49. toad (3,672 comments) says:

    @MH 4:28 pm

    I was merely giving the Police oral support.

    Seems, from the news story DFP quoted, some of them are getting more oral support than they deserve already.

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  50. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Kowtow at 5.55 asked:

    jackinabox
    What were you done for?

    Jackinabox replied at 5.58:

    Scrapbooking.

    Yeah right.

    Jackinabox is a police hater. I doubt this stems from his being too short to join the Police Force.
    I think Judith, who also criticises the police in this thread, is a pro-Bain supporter, and perhaps even an NZ Firster. Am I right, Judith?

    There is the occasional bad apple in the NZ police box, but over all they are good people who put their lives on the line without side arms facing king-hitting, often knife-carrying neanderthals. They dive into surf and rivers to rescue people in accidents, face dangerously distraught people in domestic crises, bring in often-unpredictable mentally ill folk, and all this under constant media scrutiny.

    I question what I see as over-rigorous police views on law abiding people defending themselves with firearms, but over all consider the police to be fine. Perhaps the jackinabox mob ought to be thankful the police stand between them and us law abiding folk who think we should be allowed to defend ourselves with firearms.

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  51. toad (3,672 comments) says:

    @duggledog 7:10 pm

    I think, the problem is, nobody has any respect for authority any more, especially younger generations who have grown up without corporal punishment or any boundaries whatsoever.

    Go back to Syria where you seem to belong.

    Respect for authority must be earned by authority, not imposed by it. Corrupt cops going out raping defeat respect for authority.

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  52. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Fuck off Toad, back under your red mushroom at the leftist Standard.

    You wouldn’t want to be a criminal in a communist country, Toad. But they’re good places for those waiting for kidney transplants.

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  53. Johnboy (15,460 comments) says:

    Quite right toadie. Next time I catch a crim raping my wife/murdering my children/burgling my house. I won’t call the Cop’s till I’ve checked out if they are:

    A: Culturally safe.

    B: If their anti-raping training is up to date.

    Fuckwit! :)

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  54. toad (3,672 comments) says:

    @Jack5 10:07 pm

    Do you have a problem dealing with aggression? That is an extremely nasty comment.

    And I think I comment less often at The Standard than I do here anyway.

    So who are you to be Judge, jury and executioner, Jack5?

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  55. Johnboy (15,460 comments) says:

    Shouldn’t you be 100 nautical miles out to the west of Kiwiblog sacrificing your miserable life under the propellers of the Noble Bob toadie? :)

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  56. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Re Toad at 10.15:

    Similarly, who are you to be judge and jury of the police, and to accuse someone you disagree with of belonging in the hell of war-torn Syria?

    IMHO, you are a leftist troll seeking to disrupt debate in a centrist blog.

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  57. toad (3,672 comments) says:

    @Johnboy 10:14 pm

    Quite right toadie. Next time I catch a crim raping my wife…

    …there would be a good chance the perpetrator would be exonerated by a Police officer.

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  58. Johnboy (15,460 comments) says:

    “IMHO, you are a leftist troll seeking to disrupt debate in a centrist blog.”

    What a very polite way of saying that toadie is a piece of greenie/commo shit that pops up here now and again when his masters the aussie ginga and fugley bone woman bid him to.

    You should apply for a job with McCullys mob Jack5! :)

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  59. toad (3,672 comments) says:

    @Johnboy 10:18 pm

    Shouldn’t you be 100 nautical miles out to the west of Kiwiblog sacrificing your miserable life under the propellers of the Noble Bob toadie?

    Nah, I get seasick so not going there myself, but I do support those who are out there putting their bodies on the line against the threat of an unmanageable oils spill.

    Didn’t you learn anything from Deepwater Horizon, Johnboy?

    Anyway, that aside, the topic of this thread is meant to be police corruption, and while I don’t want to detract from that, I did feel the need to reply to your off-topic detraction from it.

    @Jack5 10:20 pm

    So who is the troll? Methinks it is Johnboy, attempting to divert the thread from the topic of Police corruption to that of the response to Anadarko’s deep sea drilling campaign.

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  60. toad (3,672 comments) says:

    Johnboy 10:30 pm

    Nice. I really like your reasoned logical arguments [/sarcasm].

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  61. Johnboy (15,460 comments) says:

    I would prefer that you take note of my unabiding hatred of economic sabotage agents like your dreadful little mob of commos/tossers/weirdos and misfits toadie. :)

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  62. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “There is the occasional bad apple in the NZ police box, but over all they are good people who put their lives on the line without side arms facing king-hitting, often knife-carrying neanderthals.”

    EXCEPT WHEN THEY ARE INCOMPETANT COWARDS AYE jack5?

    Police response to the shooting of Navtej Singh

    14 May 2010 – Sixteen recommendations have been made to Police by the Independent Police Conduct Authority following its investigation into the Police response to the shooting of Navtej Singh.

    Mr Singh was shot in the abdomen during an armed robbery of the Riverton Liquor Store in Manurewa on 7 June 2008. After the initial 111 call by Mr Singh’s business partner, 31 minutes passed before Police entered the store, and a further six minutes before an ambulance arrived. Mr Singh died in Middlemore Hospital the following day. On 1 September 2008, the IPCA received a complaint from Mr Singh’s father, Nahar Singh, concerning the delay.

    The IPCA investigation was one of the most detailed ever carried out by the Authority. IPCA investigators independently interviewed 48 people, including Police operational and communications staff, St John Ambulance paramedic and communications staff, medical experts, and family and friends of Mr Singh who were at the store on the night of the shooting. The Authority Chair, Justice Lowell Goddard, met with Nahar Singh.

    The IPCA has found that the delay in Police attending the Riverton Liquor Store, and as a consequence the delay in Navtej Singh receiving emergency medical treatment, could not be justified and was undesirable. The delay was not caused by any single failing but rather by a series of procedural, and command and control failures.

    The overall effect of the catalogue of events which together conspired to create a delay in the Police response and a consequential delay in getting emergency medical attention to Navtej Singh was arguably a breach of the Police duty of care to preserve life.

    The most significant factors were the failures to properly record, analyse and communicate all relevant information from the scene, which meant that the responding officers lacked clear information about Mr Singh’s condition or the location of the offenders. It also affected coordination between Police and St John Ambulance.

    Other factors included: a shortage of local Manurewa Police units available to respond; unnecessary diversion of, and incorrect directions to, units that were responding; a lack of active oversight by NorthComms after command and control was handed to an officer in the field; a lack of flexibility in using units that were available to respond; and the time taken by officers to change into ballistic body armour.

    “The Police have a basic duty to protect life,” said Authority Chair Justice Lowell Goddard.

    “Whilst Navtej Singh’s injuries may not have been survivable, what is known is that he suffered significant pain and distress, both of which were inevitably heightened by the delays in getting him emergency medical treatment,” said Justice Goddard.

    “The Authority also recognises the distress caused to his family and friends by the delays,” she said.

    The Authority has made the following recommendations to Police:

    1. address communications centre training to:

    • ensure that staff understand the importance of managing critical information and ensuring it is passed to the incident controller in the field;

    • ensure that staff understand requirements for formal handover of command and control, including appropriate timing for handover;

    • ensure that shift commanders understand the need to maintain active oversight of critical incidents after incident control has passed to field units;

    2. ensure that all staff are trained on the National Protocol for Interaction between communication centre and field staff;

    3. treat all situations in which Police are told that someone has been shot as potentially life-threatening until medical assistance has been provided, rather than making assumptions based on the size of the wound or the presence of bleeding alone;

    4. review training for all staff on command and control, and management of critical incidents in which people may have been injured;

    5. fit Eagle with video recording equipment so that critical events can be recorded at all times, and consider the feasibility of Eagle providing a ‘live feed’ of images to the communications centre;

    6. review management of critical firearms incidents in which people have been or are suspected of being injured;

    7. review Police inter-operability with St John Ambulance and other emergency services, particularly in relation to management, transfer of critical information and post incident de briefings;

    8. ensure that Police and Ambulance use the same SFP unless there are sound operational reasons for not doing so, and ensure that other emergency services are clearly informed of the location of any SFP;

    9. ensure that inter-agency debriefing takes place when more than one agency has been involved in a critical incident to enhance inter-operability between the agencies;

    10. review firearms training to ensure that staff are competent and confident in responding to critical incidents;

    11. provide a national policy on ‘ride-along’ and SCOPE passengers in Police vehicles;

    12. prioritise the rollout of HAP vests to all districts, and ensure that, until HAP vests are available, firearms training includes familiarisation with ballistic body armour;

    13. ensure that there are appropriate mechanisms for reporting mapping inaccuracies, and consider establishing a memorandum with local authorities to ensure that relevant information (such as road changes) is passed on to Police;

    14. consider alternatives for when Language Line is not available, and ensure that communications centre staff who are experiencing difficulty with a caller’s language ask if there is anyone else at the scene who speaks English;

    15. ensure that when vehicles are permitted by District policy to carry firearms that ballistic body armour is also available in each vehicle;

    16. clarify the recording requirements for the issue of firearms expressed in the Police Manual in the context of the practical need to get firearms to a scene urgently.

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  63. big bruv (13,526 comments) says:

    Toad

    Why is it that you have no tolerance for cops who make a mistake (such as accepting an offer of oral sex from a tart) yet you seem to have no problem at all with a couple of your MP’s who rorted the tax payer with their housing allowance?

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  64. OneTrack (2,759 comments) says:

    “Making excuses will not fix the problem. They need to address the issues that continue to reflect poorly on the entire force, and on those decent police officers who do not deserve it.”

    But does it reflect badly on the whole force? No, it doesnt. One cop (out of how many are there ….) made a stupid mistake and he is being punished for it. Why are the witch burners out trying string up the whole force. Maybe thats what they wanted to do anyway.

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  65. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “But does it reflect badly on the whole force? No, it doesnt. One cop (out of how many are there ….) made a stupid mistake and he is being punished for it. ”

    One corrupt cop wouldn’t reflect badly on the whole force, but one a month?

    Here’s the problem,

    “There is the occasional bad apple in the NZ police box”

    If you claim that you are either ignorant or complicit.

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  66. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Jackinabox, you are so consumed by your hatred of police that your posts are boringly predictable. For fuck sake get on with your life if you are now out of the slammer and not on home detention.

    Perhaps part of any probation in your case should include: you are suspended from blogging for X months/years.

    “Here’s the problem,” you say in your 7.49 post.

    In fact YOU are the problem, jackinabox. Stop blaming the police!

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  67. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    ‘Thank goodness Cunliffe was never a constable a tongue twister like that would have got most crims off.’

    you are comparing Cunniliffe to the inept cunning of Inspector Clouseau

    Simply can’t be compared….. unless Cunniliffe wins three terms….. meaning he would beat John Key by a term

    That would be stunning inept cunning. Flukiness unparalleled

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  68. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Jack5, you are so consumed by your love of police that your posts are boringly predictable. For fuck sake get on with your life if you are now out of the force.

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  69. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    ‘For fuck sake get on with your life if you are now out of the force.’

    He can’t be completely wrong. The recent article on Steve Hansen quoted him as saying he was very disillusioned with his time in police and no one is saying he don’t know what he’s talking about!

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  70. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Wiki, perhaps he was disillusioned from dealing with people like jackinabox!

    Sorry, jackinabox, I’ve never been a policeman.

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  71. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    And I’ve never been in prison or on probation Jack5.

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  72. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Jackinabox: what makes you so angry then?

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  73. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Why do I hate the cops Jack5? Because I hate injustice and corruption.

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  74. Jack5 (4,786 comments) says:

    Okay, jackinabox, so you hate the police.

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  75. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “Okay, jackinabox, so you hate the police.”

    Not all of them Jack5, I’ve come across two that I know aren’t bent. 2 out of about 30, what percentage is that Jack5?

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  76. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    “Police enjoy inherent credibility and serious privileges in our society. The flip side to that is when police betray that station and privilege they should be sanctioned appropriately.”

    http://laudafinem.com/2013/11/21/bully-boy-grizzly-gnarley-old-christchurch-cop-pleads-guilty-to-premediated-assault/

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  77. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Opps, another “bad apple”.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11160998

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  78. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    Is this the same crowd that covered up the first Roastbusters complaint?

    You get that a lot, when the cops are in the gun for one of their regular fuck-ups they shave their heads for cancer research or embark on a silly run of some sort. One thing you won’t see however is them donning sack cloths and ashes and admitting that they got it horribly wrong.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/northern-advocate/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503450&objectid=11161143

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  79. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    The smoke and mirrors machine is in overdrive.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/wanganui-chronicle/news/article.cfm?c_id=1503426&objectid=11161132

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  80. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11161583

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  81. jackinabox (744 comments) says:

    He’s hit the nail squarely on the head with this comment.

    “As with so many local versions of things Australian, our unethical police behaviour is a stolid, dreary thing, as often as not a bullish but dangerous insistence on one’s view of the world, especially about whether or not someone is guilty.

    The tragedy is that the police force attracts the right sort of people and loses them because they can’t tolerate this dark side of police culture.”

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11161868

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