Unpaid speeding fines

November 15th, 2013 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

Drivers who refuse to pay speeding fines will have their licence confiscated – sometimes on the side of the road – and possibly lose their car under changes due in months.

From February, the Justice Ministry will ramp up efforts to recoup more than $200 million in outstanding traffic fines, most for speeding.

It will issue Driver Licence Stop Orders as a last resort to people who repeatedly ignore warning notices or court orders.

Any person found driving in breach of one of the orders will have their car impounded for 28 days.

Associate Justice Minister Chester Borrows said in some cases people would have to surrender their licence on the side of the road if police detected an order was in place.

He said the measure would apply only to people who ignored repeated 28-day deadlines for fines.

“You’ve got about four months from the time you’ve been stopped and given a ticket to pay. That’s not bad, and that’s interest-free credit.”

I don’t think that is unreasonable.

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32 Responses to “Unpaid speeding fines”

  1. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    There was a front page article this year stating fines paid enmasse as people rushed to clear their slates.

    I think this is an obvious tactic to reinforce the revenuing police state.

    Take the police off the roads and the road toll will still decrease. Drivers are so educated now the govt is having to think up more and more ideas to collect revenue and empower themselves more.

    Besides, speed is’nt the real issue. Over taking is where drivers keep moving out of their lanes causing collisions.

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  2. wreck1080 (3,726 comments) says:

    Treating a fine as interest free ‘credit’ smacks of revenue gathering to me.

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  3. Elaycee (4,300 comments) says:

    Whilst the bleaters and conspiracy theorists will (no doubt) whinge about this initiative, it’s actually a great move.

    Actions have consequences and if someone breaks the Law and gets pinged / fined, so be it.

    If you pay up, the matter is over. If you choose not to pay up, then your problem remains. But don’t bleat about it – you were the muppet who broke the Law in the first place.

    Zero sympathy here. :D

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  4. Lance (2,444 comments) says:

    @wikiriwhis

    “Take the police off the roads and the road toll will still decrease”

    I call bullshit on that statement.

    Maybe less camera vans set to snap at 10kph over the limit at the bottom of a hill in the middle of nowhere. But there is an oversupply of fuckwits on the road that less policing would only encourage more of said fuckwittery

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  5. marcw (227 comments) says:

    When I got my only speeding fine about 10 years ago, it stated I had 28 days to pay, so naturally I waited until the last day to send the cheque in the mail to pay. To my suprise, I got a reminder about 5 days later to say I had 28 days to pay as they hadn’t got my payment. So if you pay on time, then you are the mug as they seem to ignore their previous instruction. WTF is this for – you either pay on time or you get penalised. Talk about a softcock system, no wonder that no-one takes any notice of them.

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  6. jackinabox (570 comments) says:

    I went down to repco and bought the cheapest Navman going, it goes ding dong when I exceed 50 k in town and automatically adjusts itself to go off at 100k when I go out of town. No speeding fines for me.

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  7. Chris2 (754 comments) says:

    Australia States have been doing this for over 30 years, and it also includes unpaid parking fines. First they cancel the registration on the car (making it illegal to drive it as registration includes compulsory insurance), then they cancel your Drivers Licence.

    If the Government is serious about recovering unpaid debt they should decline to renew the expiring Passports of New Zealanders living overseas who refuse to make arrangements to pay back their student loans. I guarantee this would bring student loan debt under control by those living abroad who have a “fuck you” attitude to repaying their debt and obligations.

    No valid NZ passport = one-way trip back to NZ =No more international travel. No more fun.

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  8. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “Maybe less camera vans set to snap at 10kph over the limit at the bottom of a hill in the middle of nowhere. ”

    Agree

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  9. srylands (386 comments) says:

    “Take the police off the roads and the road toll will still decrease.”

    I doubt that. There is a small, but dangerous minority of lunatics who I quite like the police to look out for.

    I have no issue with the proposed policy of fine recovery.

    Personally I would like to see the police focus change to stopping speeding in urban areas – e.g. driving at 70 km/h past schools and quiet neighbourhoods. Open road speed limits could (and should) be more variable. In fine weather, and in light traffic, I should be able to safely drive at 130 kmh on the wellington-porirua motorway. 100 km/h is ridiculous. The variable speed signs are in place.

    And please why can’t we fine drivers for driving at 80 km/h in the RIGHT (fast) lane of the motorway?

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  10. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (785 comments) says:

    This will be gone by lunch time when Cunliffe-Norman-Peters-Hone take over in 2014….

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  11. chris (559 comments) says:

    You forgot the best quote in the article:

    Labour transport spokeswoman Darien Fenton said her party supported the policy, though it held concerns it could penalise people who needed their licence to get to work.

    Well those people who need their licenses to get to work have two choices 1) don’t speed or 2) pay the fine. And a bonus 3rd choice, take public transport like the LabourGreens love so much.

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  12. PaulL (5,872 comments) says:

    No, it won’t be. No government willingly gives up revenue.

    The bottom line is that there’s no argument against it. People owe the debt. Sure, it causes hardship to pay it, that’s the point of the fine in the first place.

    What’s more likely is that a Cunliffe-Norman-Peters-Hone govt would decide to emulate some Scandanavian countries and set fines based on income. Creating another incentive to structure your affairs to minimise taxable income (since that’s what it’s based on).

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  13. Nigel Kearney (864 comments) says:

    The bottom line is that there’s no argument against it. People owe the debt.

    I have some debts I am having a bit of difficulty collecting. Will the police hunt down the people who owe me money and seize their property so I can get paid? The answer is they won’t, because for some reason anyone who gets behind the wheel instantly becomes a second class citizen who is subject to being arbitrarily stopped and questioned, forced to give evidence against themselves and may have their property seized without the same process that is required for other debtors.

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  14. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    “anyone who gets behind the wheel instantly becomes a second class citizen ”

    As a direct result of banning nuclear ships and cutting off billions from spending sailors over the decades.

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  15. jcuk (583 comments) says:

    Since I got my one and only speeding ticket in 1964 I doubt if it will affect me … but then I have always had a vehicle which is comfortable, even after it warms up on a long trip, of staying within the speed limits and the 10km tolerance …. last time I passed a speed indicator I found at 80Kmph I was actually doing 76 perhaps 77.

    I feel sorry for the social climbing idiots with their more powerful cars designed to be driven faster than the limits. With their boom boxes blaring and completely unaware of what others are doing outside their litle metal box. I frequently look in my rear vision mirror and pull over where I think it is safe to let them pass and collect their speeding tickets LOL. If a car is catching up with me I endeavour to let them pass at the next safe [IMO] spot.

    Last trip I did on SH 6 both going and returning at the same spot there was a plain car with lights flashing talking to some small car motorist … one of the dips between Cromwell and Wanaka LOL

    I have also found out that when towing a trailer and restricting my speed to 90k+10k It took me around 15 minutes longer for a long trip [ around 200k ] and petrol consumption went down to my delight.

    You could say I have been lucky, as the magistrate said back in 1964, but I like to think it is sensible driving.

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  16. big bruv (13,249 comments) says:

    Oh good!

    Look for more of these income generators on our roads filling their quota of tickets.

    Over Labour weekend I heard the transport enforces (let’s face it, they are not real Police) banging on about how they were out in force at holiday blackspots keeping us safe when in reality they were stuck on our cities motorways hiding behind bushes with their income generating cameras.

    We are being conned people, the transport enforces are told they have to fill a quota and that is what they are doing, any reduction in driver accidents over the holiday period is down to the actions of the drivers, it has NOTHING to do with the traffic enforcers.

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  17. PaulL (5,872 comments) says:

    @Nigel: One of the rules of driving is that you stay within the rules. It makes sense to me that if you’ve failed to stay within the rules, you’ve been given a fine, and you’ve chosen not to pay that fine, then we remove your privilege of driving on the roads.

    If you don’t like the rules, that’s different. I’d agree that modern cars and roads have become enormously safer, but nothing’s been done to our speed limits. But that’s a different argument.

    @Jcuk: sort of sounds like you’re one of those old crusty guys who drives below the speed limit and pisses everyone else. Maybe that’s not the case, but your description sounds that way. If you’re pulling over to let people past, no real worries. But I don’t think that it’s wrong for other people to drive at the limit as the law allows, particularly if their car is safe at that speed.

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  18. jackinabox (570 comments) says:

    jackinabox (108) Says:
    November 15th, 2013 at 11:21 am
    I went down to repco and bought the cheapest Navman going, it goes ding dong when I exceed 50 k in town and automatically adjusts itself to go off at 100k when I go out of town. No speeding fines for me.
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    Who was the dirty lowdown mofo that gave me a thumbs down? Probably a revenuer who feels threatened by my simple but effective anti speeding ticket measure.

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  19. RRM (9,435 comments) says:

    Wikiriwhis – reference for “overtaking causes collisions” please?

    Outside of passing lanes it tends to be only confident people who know what they’re doing who pull out and overtake others. A majority of traffic is content to just sit behind slow-moving vehicles until their either destination or a passing lane appears.

    In my concise, highly scientific reading of the news media (that’s a little joke) collisions more often than not tend to be the result of people crossing the centreline due to errors like

    :arrow:falling asleep, or

    :arrow:cornering too fast, or

    :arrow:not paying enough attention to what they’re doing…

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  20. PaulL (5,872 comments) says:

    @RRM: I sometimes think that kiwiblog has an over supply of crusty old gentlemen who don’t really see why people need to keep doing things so fast. I guess they’re all planning to vote for Colin Craig.

    Reminds me of a friend of my parents who was explaining about how he was driving in a line of traffic – he just coincidentally was at the front of that line of traffic – when he saw a crazy person undertaking risky overtaking manoeuvres in the line behind him. When this guy got to him, he slowed down because he thought that he had no reason to be in such a hurry. This guy eventually passed him, then slowed right down until he stopped. So he stopped too, and the guy got out and took to his car with a tire iron.

    Clearly a case of road rage, and very unacceptable. But this particular guy didn’t have the self awareness to ask:
    – why did he happen to be at the front of the line of traffic, and is it possible the people in the line of traffic behind him were maybe frustrated at that?
    – why did he need to slow down and attempt to control what the guy behind him was doing? Who appointed him to judge whether other people have a reason to be in a hurry
    – WTF did he stop when the guy in front of him stopped, instead of driving around him.

    Anyway, I sometimes wonder whether that guy is one of our commenters here. I won’t hazard a guess as to whom, but there are a few candidates.

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  21. louie (89 comments) says:

    Yes! Hopefully will have an impact on the boy racers etc who run up masses on tickets and never attempt to pay.

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  22. seanmaitland (455 comments) says:

    @PaulL – i didn’t get that at all from Jcuk’s comment – sounds like he is perfectly aware of what his vehicle’s speed is in real life as opposed to what the speedo in his car is.

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  23. RRM (9,435 comments) says:

    PaulL –

    It depends on who’s online.. some days kiwiblog’s the complete opposite, I should be allowed to drive at any speed I choose, people who don’t like my speed should stay off the road, and cops should applaud me as I roar past…

    I read an interesting article once, by someone who theorised that the roads would be a much more civilised place if all cars were convertibles. Instead of these sealed glass bubbles that (a) make you feel like the public roads are an extension of your own home and personal space, and (b) enable and encourage you to nut off at people in a way you would never dream of doing in any other circumstances, because they can’t hear you and you can’t hear what they respond with. The Oatmeal has a cartoon about this as well.

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  24. Griff (6,719 comments) says:

    The 100kph limit has not changed for decades
    Cars have .

    To many changes in speed limits.
    Forcing you to spend to much attention on the cars speed and road signs on our highways.

    Fines rapidly escalate with costs
    A $100 speeding fine is a disproportionate penalty to a student, youth or those on a benefit.

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  25. Michael (895 comments) says:

    I see in the article that Labour are concerned that fine defaulters might not be able to drive to work if their cars are impounded and licences cancelled.

    That shouldn’t be a problem if they drive inside the law and if they don’t, pay up any fines on time.

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  26. jackinabox (570 comments) says:

    “Forcing you to spend to much attention on the cars speed and road signs on our highways.”

    My $100 Navman does all that and more, the lady on the speaker reminds where I’m going and how to get there too;) Marvellous!!!

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  27. chris (559 comments) says:

    To many changes in speed limits. Forcing you to spend to much attention on the cars speed and road signs on our highways.

    And there I was thinking you *should* be paying attention to road signs and your speed when out driving.

    A $100 speeding fine is a disproportionate penalty to a student, youth or those on a benefit.

    Once again, if you don’t want to / can’t afford to pay fines, don’t speed. You might not like the rules, but rules are rules. For example, I find it annoying the speed limit approaching and on Auckland’s Harbour Bridge is 80k, and the motorway south from Papakura is 100k when it could quite safely be 120k but I stick within the established limits because those are the rules. Well, maybe within that 10k allowance :)

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  28. jackinabox (570 comments) says:

    “Forcing you to spend to much attention on the cars speed and road signs on our highways.”

    My $100 Navman does all that and more, the lady on the speaker reminds where I’m going and how to get there too;) Marvellous!!!

    All that is needed now is to hook the Navman up to the cruise control and bobs your uncle, no more speeders, no more dangerous police chases, no more boy racers drag hooning up and down my cul de sac. Bliss!

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  29. Steve (North Shore) (4,497 comments) says:

    I guess some people need some sort of socialist control seeing as they can’t control themselves to look at the road signs and the speddometer.
    But taking instructions from a Navman because you can’t do it yourself?

    This is a pisstake isn’t it? You wound me up and I fell into the trap

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  30. Left Right and Centre (2,819 comments) says:

    I was on the motorway doing 100. Am I moving at all ? Are we there yet ? At 100 it feels like you’re not moving. How are you meant to stick to 50 ffs ?

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  31. lolitasbrother (470 comments) says:

    jackinabox (112) Says:
    November 15th, 2013 at 11:21 am
    I went down to repco and bought the cheapest Navman going, it goes ding dong when I exceed 50 k in town and automatically adjusts itself to go off at 100k when I go out of town. No speeding fines for me.

    jackinabox..
    Similar but more difficult than NZ
    Speed limits in Australia go from 30, 40, 50, up to 120.
    Navcam and brothers only works as long as the program you have can catch up with rapidly changing speed limits.

    Driving round Australia, you will soon learn to look for signs rather than listen to your on board.
    You have to be watching all the time
    As well infra red cameras monitor distance times.
    Extremely dangerous.

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  32. jackinabox (570 comments) says:

    Who cares about driving round Australia? Travel all day through the same boring scrub and when you look at your road map at the end of a long, sweaty day you’ve gone about half an inch. Bugger that for a joke. Anyway, my Navman works perfectly well here in NZ and I would recommend it to anyone who doesn’t want to be snapped for speeding.

    “Speed limits in Australia go from 30, 40, 50, up to 120.”

    I drove down a lane between two tall buildings the other day and my Navman went ding dong and showed a speed limit of 10k. Whatever the limit, posted or otherwise my little bit of wizardry shows the maximum speed.

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