A huge bust

December 5th, 2013 at 7:52 am by David Farrar

The Herald reports:

More than $120 million in drugs and assets have been seized during a record-breaking operation involving 330 officers from police, OFCANZ and Customs this morning.

Forty search warrants were executed at residential and business premises across Auckland and Waikato and 24 people were arrested at the conclusion of an 18 month investigation named Operation Ghost.

More than 330 kilograms of the Class B drug ContacNT was also seized in what police described as “the biggest haul of its kind in New Zealand history”.

ContacNT is manufactured legally in China but is used in New Zealand to produce methamphetamine.

The ContacNT seized during Operation Ghost is enough to produce up to 100 kilograms of methamphetamine which has a corresponding street value of $100 million. …

“Police and OFCANZ have eliminated a criminal network responsible for importing and distributing Class B drugs which are used to produce methamphetamine.

“Operation Ghost sends a powerful message to the criminal community that we will use every legal avenue at our disposal to target organised crime in New Zealand.”

It will be interesting to see who the 24 people arrested are, and if they have gang affiliations.

 

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94 Responses to “A huge bust”

  1. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    Growth in quantity of drugs seized = growth in quantity of drugs on the street.

    Hurray for prohibition.

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  2. Longknives (4,044 comments) says:

    WTF Scott?
    Are you suggesting the Police should turn a blind eye to these criminals??

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  3. david (2,482 comments) says:

    Read the Post headline and thought it must have been about Dolly Parton coming to NZ.

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  4. Elaycee (4,066 comments) says:

    The Operation Ghost drug bust is great news all round…. the best part is that 100kg of meth with a corresponding ‘P’ value of $100 million will not hit the streets / there were many arrests / morons will be locked up / all good.

    Well done to all involved in the Operation.

    And whilst the usual placard wavers will bleat about some of the tactics used in the course of the Operation, I have no issues at all if the Police use all available powers (including co-operation across several agencies) to stop crap of this nature from finding its way onto our streets.

    Brilliant.

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  5. rouppe (852 comments) says:

    It appears many of those arrested are of Vietnamese and Chinese origin, though they have NZ residency. I hope that status is immediately revoked, and after serving their imprisonment they are immediately deported along with all family members.

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  6. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    WTF Scott?
    Are you suggesting the Police should turn a blind eye to these criminals??

    It is the law that makes a crime, not the action of the person. For it to be a crime it must be described as such in legislation. You could make blue eyed babies a “crime” to if you wanted.

    The fact is the law itself is causing more harm than the problem it is designed to address. The whole gang underworld thing would not exist if the law was not there. Gangs, prostitution, violence are all due to the law, not the drug.

    Drug laws do not work and cost a fortune. Money that could be better spent elsewhere. Everyone who wants to take drugs is already doing so. I did not shoot up this morning, but that is not because it is illegal. It is because I don’t do drugs.

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  7. alex Masterley (1,438 comments) says:

    Given the names of those who were denied bail yesterday, I suspect that those involved were largely of Asian origin and their dealing gangs would have been purely commercial in nature.

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  8. Reid (15,530 comments) says:

    Are you suggesting the Police should turn a blind eye to these criminals?

    I think what he’s saying is that prohibition doesn’t work and merely creates a market which is exploited by criminals. If you take away that market by decriminalizing it then you take away the profit margin for criminals and history has proven not just here but everywhere that prohibition doesn’t and cannot work. How long has the war on drugs been going on in the US for example and what results has it had? Zero, right? For billions spent. And look at what’s happening in Mexico today with the violence that has occurred as a direct result of the policy because it’s provided criminals with billions of dollars to organise and buy weapons. How is that in any way a logical policy, if you live in the real world? Imagine if there was no money in drugs. Isn’t that a better way to go, to at least be open to discussing it?

    It will be interesting to see who the 24 people arrested are, and if they have gang affiliations.

    They’re all Asians so Triads probably, aligned with the local gangs for the distribution. Also note all of them are either citizens or have permanent residence. This is less a fault of the Immigration dept and more a fault of the focus on throughput for visa applications because it’s a key measure of productivity and also the marketing focus they put driven from the Minister down on making it easy for people to come here to earn tourism and educational dollars. They need to change that to allow time for proper security checks to be made and that change needs to come from the Minister, but I guarantee it won’t happen.

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  9. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    It appears many of those arrested are of Vietnamese and Chinese origin, though they have NZ residency. I hope that status is immediately revoked, and after serving their imprisonment they are immediately deported along with all family members.

    If there names were, Bert, Fred and Joe, would you have suggested they be shipped back to England ?

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  10. MH (558 comments) says:

    Forget Dolly,a drop off in prep for The Rolling Gall Stones tour ?

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  11. Yoza (1,348 comments) says:

    Waste of time and resources, these cops need to find real jobs.
    m

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  12. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    OMG the huge profit to be made selling illegal drugs tempted people to sell them – who’d have guessed !

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  13. alloytoo (337 comments) says:

    @ Kea

    “If there names were, Bert, Fred and Joe, would you have suggested they be shipped back to England ?”

    Yes.

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  14. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    We have a law against murder but murder keeps happening.It costs a fortune to investigate, prosecute and incarcerate.

    Let’s scrap the law it doesn’t work.

    ‘It’s the law that makes it a crime”……….what piffle from the resident troll.

    Drug crime thrives because the penalties aren’t severe enough.Shoot the fuckers.

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  15. wat dabney (3,439 comments) says:

    End the appalling War on Drugs and have people such as these “330 officers from police, OFCANZ and Customs” thugs find real jobs.

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  16. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    kowtow

    I bet you think refer madness is a factual documentary ?

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  17. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    ‘It’s the law that makes it a crime”……….what piffle from the resident troll.

    katy, no you are factually wrong. Crime is created by statute law. You can not be charged with a “crime” that is not descriped in legistlation. In some countries alcohol is illegal. It is a “crime”.

    http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1961/0043/latest/whole.html

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  18. brucech (3 comments) says:

    A Huge Bust.
    A large asian connection has been reported. All 24 people arrested are NZ citizens or permanent residents.
    I thought our imigration rules required people of ‘good character’
    I think our journalists should be asking questions of our Imigration Department.

    Bruce ch

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  19. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    In some places oral sex is a crime !!!!!

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  20. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    Oral sex must be terrible and people should not do it because it’s illegal in some US states and other countries also…..

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  21. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    Common law.

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  22. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    In some places oral sex is a crime !!!!!

    burt, I am picking Dunedin ? ;)

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  23. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Common law.

    katy, you are not paying attention.

    Not Common Law. Codified criminal law creates crime.

    What are your views on biblical crimes & penalties, such as killing naughty kids and stoning rape victims to death along with those who work on the sabath ?

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  24. rouppe (852 comments) says:

    Kea @ 8:42.

    Just because their name is Bert, Fred or Joe doesn’t mean they were born in England, idiot.

    If they were born in England, or Canada, or USA, or Australia or anywhere for that matter then yes, I would say that.

    What’s your problem? Want to cuddle crims? Len’s about somewhere why don’t you give him a cuddle he hasn’t had one for awhile

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  25. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    kea troll always takes the thread back to his /her obsession ,the Old Testament .

    What a waste of time.

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  26. Reid (15,530 comments) says:

    Drug crime thrives because the penalties aren’t severe enough.

    Drug crime occurs because of the outrageous profit margins. It’s a highly convenient way for organised criminals to make millions of dollars. If that money wasn’t available then criminal gangs would be forced to return to the same lifestyle they had in the 1970′s, eking out a miserable existence.

    In other jurisdictions like Australia, those same gangs would turn to human trafficking in the sex trade because that’s incredibly profitable too, sadly. But they couldn’t do that here on any large scale because the market is too small. If they started kidnapping people off the street and exporting them they wouldn’t get very far before being noticed and the market for imports here in NZ is not large enough to be profitable. It is in other countries but not here.

    Those who wish to continue the prohibition approach need to answer the following question: how pray tell do they expect prohibition to ever work when it’s never worked anywhere in the world? Increasing penalties doesn’t work. Most of the people inside the US prison system are users, locked away for years for possession and the US has the highest rate of imprisonment in the world. And that hasn’t worked, has it. Look at Mexico as I said. That just illustrates the market inside the US remains as insatiable as it ever has been, despite the risk of spending years inside a prison. Interdiction hasn’t worked, either. If anyone in NZ wants to lay their hands on meth or any other drug, they can. That proves interdiction is not working and will not work. So how long does one have to beat one’s head against the brick wall before one finally gets it through one’s thick skull that a different approach is required?

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  27. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    rouppe re Fred etc

    kea’s a troll. He threw that in simply because someone had the audacity to point out the suspects may be “diverse”, you know the types we’re meant to celebrate as they enrich us so much.

    Note ,kea has turned the topic to the Old Testament….more trolling.

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  28. MH (558 comments) says:

    More useless faxs: knowledge and evidence of oral sex was only passed on by word of mouth.

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  29. F E Smith (3,273 comments) says:

    and if they have gang affiliations.

    A common misconception promoted by the endless police attention to gangs.  While gangs are often commonly involved in distribution of illegal drugs (although they are not the main suppliers) it is my understanding that they do not generally get involved in importation.

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  30. UglyTruth (3,008 comments) says:

    It is the law that makes a crime, not the action of the person.

    Rules and law are different things. The fact that you declare yourself to be sovereign doesn’t mean that your rules suddenly become law.

    For it to be a crime it must be described as such in legislation. You could make blue eyed babies a “crime” to if you wanted.

    Crime, as a violation of public law, existed before legislation came into being.

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  31. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    What’s your problem? Want to cuddle crims? Len’s about somewhere why don’t you give him a cuddle he hasn’t had one for awhile

    rouppe

    1. Take your pick.

    2. Yes.

    3. Ok.

    F E Smith, are you sure about gangs not being involved in importation ? I would challenge that. Maybe it has more to do with what you define as a gang ?

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  32. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    Are gangs like unions donating to politicians to get unworkable legislation passed in their own best interests ?

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  33. marcw (206 comments) says:

    For those that want to decriminalise drug trafficing, then is it OK if I shoot any c**t I catch selling these to any of my family? Didn’t think so – you only want to decriminalise the bits you can profit from eh.

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  34. hj (5,677 comments) says:

    Yoza (921 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 8:53 am
    Waste of time and resources, these cops need to find real jobs.
    ….
    and the Greens are entitled to their opinion Yoza.

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  35. wikiriwhis business (3,286 comments) says:

    ‘Are gangs like unions donating to politicians to get unworkable legislation passed in their own best interests ?’

    With the sport conspiracy found, your question is fundamentally valid.

    Police liason closely with gangs. I would suspect you are more right than wrong. And actually far more right.

    Pfffff. Conspiracy all over the sport fixing. Imagine what politicians and the UN are up to in merging one world govt.

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  36. hj (5,677 comments) says:

    Herald Wanker: Ko lighting way for NZ’s Asia-embracing future
    “There is one aspect of our increasing embrace of Asia and Asian immigrants that the new Asia New Zealand Foundation study does not accord sufficient weight.

    That is the part played by sport, an arena in which no one has had a greater role than Lydia Ko.”

    …………………………
    Why would we embrace “Asia”… as in warts and all?

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  37. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    FE Smith

    “From my understanding…..”

    Typical defence lawyer.

    It takes organised criminals to import and then distribute this shit .Call them triads,mafia,gangs ,whatever……all the same thing.

    It sure ain’t some poor ,struggling ,individual ,honest to goodness citizen out there working to make a decent life for himself and his family.Which is what the crim huggers here seem to want us to believe.

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  38. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    marcw (171 comments) says:

    December 5th, 2013 at 10:12 am
    For those that want to decriminalise drug trafficing, then is it OK if I shoot any c**t I catch selling these to any of my family? Didn’t think so – you only want to decriminalise the bits you can profit from eh.

    So you imply the only thing stopping your family from doing drugs is the threat of criminal prosecution. And you want drug dealers to take responsibility for that ?

    I think you may find the problem is closer to home.

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  39. Reid (15,530 comments) says:

    For those that want to decriminalise drug trafficing, then is it OK if I shoot any c**t I catch selling these to any of my family?

    marcw, hear that wooshing sound?

    See, decriminalising means there are no sellers apart from govt approved ones like pharmacies, and usage is treated as any other public health issue. The details are myriad, however you design it doesn’t matter. You could for example require identification before purchase or not, you could tax it or not, etc etc etc etc. Who cares what the details are. The important point is accepting the principle of decriminalising, on the perfectly plain and factual basis that prohibition has never and will never work, so what’s the alternative.

    If your kids are going to buy drugs, they’re going to buy drugs. You’re living in fantasy land if you think that drugs are not right now, today, available for them to buy if they so wish. And you’re also living in fantasy land if you think that drugs will not always be available for them to buy, if they so wish. So given that FACT, your only question should be if you’re at all rational, would you rather they buy it from a tinny house full of criminals or from a pharmacy? That’s your only question. There isn’t any other. If you live in the real world.

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  40. F E Smith (3,273 comments) says:

    It takes organised criminals to import and then distribute this shit .Call them triads,mafia,gangs ,whatever……all the same thing.

    Perhaps, but when somebody in NZ talks about gangs we understand that they mean a particular type of organisation.  If you want to expand that meaning so that all organised crime is termed a ‘gang’ then fine, but that is not what it means now. 

    I am reminded of a trial for distribution where most of the accused were middle-aged women, mostly single mothers who were peddling their children’s ritalin prescription.  They were somewhat organised and were definitely committing crime, so by your definition they were a gang.

    To be honest, I don’t understand why you would have a go at me about that.

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  41. F E Smith (3,273 comments) says:

    decriminalising means there are no sellers apart from govt approved ones like pharmacies, and usage is treated as any other public health issue

    The experience in Colorado so far would suggest that is incorrect.

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  42. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    It’s FE’s tone that gives him away…..

    “A common misconception promoted by the endless police attention to gangs”.

    Oh diddums,do the nasty police give the nice gang people a hard time?Naughty,naughty police.

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  43. Reid (15,530 comments) says:

    The experience in Colorado so far would suggest that is incorrect.

    I don’t know the details of their design FES. I understand it’s just marijuana, not the rest. I also think its early days. I also wouldn’t think you could judge success or otherwise based on one state in the union. I also don’t see this as an arguement against the principle but more against the design and implementation of it.

    After all, just because a plane crashes doesn’t mean planes can’t fly, does it. Same thing here.

    And the principle is hard to argue with. We’ve had decades and generations of experience with prohibition and whatever we’ve tried has never made a jot of difference. Not one jot. So how can we possibly expect different results in the future if we keep on trying the same old thing?

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  44. F E Smith (3,273 comments) says:

    It’s FE’s tone that gives him away…..

    “A common misconception promoted by the endless police attention to gangs”.

    Oh diddums,do the nasty police give the nice gang people a hard time?Naughty,naughty police.

    That makes no sense at all.  I said nothing like that.

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  45. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    NZ needs better governance for drug policy.

    Situations like having Jim Anderton having a say in drug (or suicide) policy is complete madness.

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  46. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    katy, you really should consider moving to Saudi Arabia.

    Those boys know how to deal with those druggies, and homos too. :)

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  47. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    Good point … those countries with the death penalty for drugs – they have no drugs right ?

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  48. wikiriwhis business (3,286 comments) says:

    In Afghanistan the US Marines gaurd the opium reserves

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  49. cha (3,533 comments) says:

    Drug crime thrives because the penalties aren’t severe enough.Shoot the fuckers.

    The attitude fits right in with Islamic codes – why not go the whole hog and call for the stoning of adulteresses and routine amputations for thievery.

    http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2013/11/26/Thai-to-hang-for-carrying-cannabis-Woman-caught-with-more-than-18kg-of-drugs-at-express-bus-terminal.aspx

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  50. jackinabox (352 comments) says:

    “Kea (9,247 comments) says:

    December 5th, 2013 at 10:51 am

    katy, you really should consider moving to Saudi Arabia.

    Those boys know how to deal with those druggies, and homos too.”

    Don’t forget lady drivers Kea.

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  51. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    lady drivers

    jackinabox, stop being silly. That is just crazy talk ! ;)

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  52. wikiriwhis business (3,286 comments) says:

    ‘The attitude fits right in with Islamic codes – why not go the whole hog and call for the stoning of adulteresses and routine amputations for thievery.’

    Capital punishment definitely needs to be returned. Violence in our society is why police want to be armed.

    Execution should definitely be the punishment for eye witness testimoney.

    For instance, the murderers of Nia Glassie should be extinct as a dead parrot.

    No eye witnesses though should invoke custodial sentences.

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  53. wikiriwhis business (3,286 comments) says:

    ‘jackinabox, stop being silly. That is just crazy talk ‘

    Mostly, but not completely.

    I would also suggest females should be banned from operating credit cards.

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  54. UglyTruth (3,008 comments) says:

    Historically, if the shoe was on the other foot then the Crown would be crying for military force to punish those who had taken their drugs from them.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/0/20428167

    The lucrative nature of the drug industry attracts all sort of predators, the Crown is one of the larger players in this game.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-multi-billion-dollar-laundering-of-drug-profits-united-nations-reports-record-afghan-opium-production/5358333

    The multi-billion dollar laundering of drug profits supports the Western banking system and the world economy. As explained by Michael C. Ruppert in Crossing the Rubicon, “the CIA is Wall Street, and drug money is king”. Drug money, in Ruppert’s analysis, is the steroids of the financial world.

    http://www.constitution.org/col/octocaso.htm

    In investigations it is an old rule that you “follow the money”, but in this case we can track the spread of the PROMIS package to follow the people who are following the money, and in so doing, exhibit the links in the network of criminal influence around the world and back to their origins, the way a physician might use an angiogram to reveal the blood flows in a human body.

    Along the way the authors touch on virtually every kind of criminal enterprise and official corruption and abuse. They tie it all together in what is, if nothing else, the most complete and complex conspiracy theory yet developed, and one that is perhaps the best supported by available evidence. If even a part of this is true, it demands the attention of every responsible person. There is no escaping this monster. Either we kill it or it will kill us.

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  55. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Capital punishment definitely needs to be returned. Violence in our society is why police want to be armed.

    Bullshit.

    History [and current events] conclusively prove that you are far more likely to die at the hands of the state than by the actions of your fellow citizens.

    Every war and large scale oppression of human rights has been done by the state. Individuals kill a few, the armed state kills by the millions. Every tyrant and despot employs the sevices of their armed police to bring death, torture and oppression to the masses.

    Stop and think about what you are saying.

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  56. wikiriwhis business (3,286 comments) says:

    drug that’s a tourist attraction

    The drink I’m talking about is ayahuasca, a hallucinogenic, medicinal shaman brew of the Amazon that has long been used in the indigenous cultures of Colombia and Peru, but is also experiencing a surge in popularity as a tourism attraction for Westerners seeking something different.

    The tourists want in. They’ve heard about this spiritual brew, an infusion of plants containing dimethyltryptamine (DMT), that – depending on your point of view – either heals its users and allows them all new spiritual understanding, or just gets them wasted on hallucinogens

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/news/9475737/The-drug-thats-a-tourist-attraction

    Jim Anderton would roll over in his grave. O wait on he’s still alive. Wonder why he would never comment yet shrieked liked a mad chook over far less

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  57. MH (558 comments) says:

    Stop ganging up on the Earl of Birkenhead.

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  58. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    wikiriwhis business, well either way a good dose of Sharia law, as demanded by katy, should fix all those problems.

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  59. Dirty Rat (377 comments) says:

    Drugs are for fuckwits…

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  60. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Drugs are for fuckwits…

    Alcohol too ?

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  61. RRM (8,988 comments) says:

    I expected this post entitled “A huge bust” to contain NSFW photos.

    Disappointing DPF.

    [leaves]

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  62. Dirty Rat (377 comments) says:

    Alcohol too ?

    The excuse of a fuckwit

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  63. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Kea (9,260 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 12:51 pm

    Drugs are for fuckwits…

    Alcohol too ?

    The question is redundant. Alcohol is a drug. :)

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  64. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    The question is redundant. Alcohol is a drug.

    Weihana, are you a “fuckwit” too ? ;)

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  65. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    …seized in what police described as “the biggest haul of its kind in New Zealand history”…

    That is… until the next “biggest haul”. Assuming that the seizure significantly reduces supply at all then the price of the drug increases. When the price increases the incentive increases to increase the supply to meet the demand. A new bunch of opportunists quickly scramble for a big pay day and the cycle continues.

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  66. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Weihana, It might put the price up at bit, making it even more attractive to potential dealers.

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  67. Yoza (1,348 comments) says:

    The big joke here is the police have captured 300 kg of cold medicine which is illegal in ‘liberal’ New Zealand yet perfectly legal to buy over the counter in authoritarian China.

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  68. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Kea (9,262 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 3:52 pm

    The question is redundant. Alcohol is a drug.

    Weihana, are you a “fuckwit” too ?

    Must be. I enjoy a drink as much as the next person… and then another…

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  69. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Weihana, just as long as you don’t puff on a joint and fall into reefer madness.

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  70. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    The ContacNT seized during Operation Ghost is enough to produce up to 100 kilograms of methamphetamine which has a corresponding street value of $100 million.

    This calculation seems questionable. The street value of a drug is determined by its supply and demand in the market. However as a portion of the total supply is always being seized then surely there is a difference between the amount attempted to be supplied (the pre-seizure supply) and the actual amount supplied. The street price is dictated by the actual amount supplied thus using the street price for a portion of the supply seized seems a bit of an apples to oranges comparison. It would then lead one to the fallacious conclusion that if 100kg is seized then people will consume less of the drug to the value of $100 million dollars when it’s more likely that the amount attempted to be supplied (i.e. the pre-seizure supply) will increase to offset whatever the police manage to seize.

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  71. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Kea,

    Well you never know… I might suffer “chronic pain” at some point in the future requiring some sort of “natural therapy” to resolve. :)

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  72. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Weihana, be careful. Hospital emergency rooms are full of people who, puffed on a joint, every Friday and Saturday night. The streets a full of brawling disorderly joint puffers.

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  73. Tautaioleua (266 comments) says:

    At most Chinese airports there are two lines for security. One for the Han Chinese, and one for everybody else. Unsurprisingly, most of our illegal drug imports arrive from the east.

    Our government, and others, should be calling for an end to this ‘separate but equal’ nonsense at local security points in China. I bet the drug busts at the Auckland airport would drop dramatically if the local Chinese security officers were doing their jobs.

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  74. nasska (9,501 comments) says:

    Perhaps we should ask the Interstate Narcotics Assn for help Kea. :)

    Ref: https://www.dropbox.com/s/1x8v7bcnugrgebh/Itmustbeevil%20%206.jpg

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  75. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    kowtow (5,815 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 8:57 am

    Drug crime thrives because the penalties aren’t severe enough.Shoot the fuckers.

    If this worked the countries that “shoot the fuckers” wouldn’t have to keep doing it. For some strange reason people keep lining up to be killed… I wonder what it is that motivates them… hmmmmm…

    I wonder how many parents would pull out a gun and pull the trigger if their own son or daughter was caught with drugs. I suppose a kid who uses drugs deserves to die every bit as much as a daughter who has sex outside of marriage… it’s about maintaining family honour.

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  76. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    I suppose a kid who uses drugs deserves to die every bit as much as a daughter who has sex outside of marriage… it’s about maintaining family honour.

    You better get dinner on, kowtow will be home soon :)

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  77. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    nasska, :)

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  78. Judith (5,660 comments) says:

    Kea (9,268 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 4:25 pm

    …The streets a full of brawling disorderly joint puffers…

    I actually disagree with this comment, which some may have smoked ‘the weed’, that is not the problem, the common factor between all those idiots (except for the ones on P) is the alcohol. Alcohol causes more damage in our society than weed ever did.

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  79. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Judith dear, scroll up a bit ;)

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  80. Judith (5,660 comments) says:

    @ Kea (9,270 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 4:48 pm

    Sorry, I only read the last few comments. That’ll teach me! :-)

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  81. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Judith, the disturbing thing is there are those who actually think like that !

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  82. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    weihana

    I should have been clearer ,”shoot the fuckers” relates to the big time traffickers.The importers,manufacturers, distributors.

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  83. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    kowtow,

    i.e. what they do already.

    So if a member of your family sold drugs to someone would you pull the trigger to maintain your family’s honour?

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  84. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Weihana, imagine if the kid sold drugs on the sabbath and was disobedient as well !

    Hardly bears thinking about.

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  85. Longknives (4,044 comments) says:

    Kowtow-Get with the program man.
    Drugs are cool and completely harmless….Drug dealers should be commended for their entrepreneurial skills!
    It’s only those pesky Cops and the ‘Prohibitive’ Government trying to ruin everyone’s fun….
    Got it?

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  86. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    weihana

    I should have been clearer ….

    katy, no you were perfectly clear. You should have been: smarter/saner/rational etc.

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  87. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Longknives , Is the only thing keeping a needle out of your arm the threat of going to jail ?

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  88. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Longknives (3,420 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 7:19 pm

    Kowtow-Get with the program man.
    Drugs are cool and completely harmless….

    Can’t address the actual argument, so make up an easier one to knock over… what do they call those again?

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  89. Yoza (1,348 comments) says:

    Longknives (3,423 comments) says:
    December 5th, 2013 at 7:19 pm

    Kowtow-Get with the program man.
    Drugs are cool and completely harmless….Drug dealers should be commended for their entrepreneurial skills!
    It’s only those pesky Cops and the ‘Prohibitive’ Government trying to ruin everyone’s fun….
    Got it?

    The use of illicit drugs damages people’s health. It is the illegality of the substance which increases their allure amongst the young and impressionable, when they become a part of the drug scene they join a secretive clandestine sub-culture; it is a means of rebelling without effort.

    Treating these particular health threats as criminal offences is not achieving the outcomes the authorities claim. This latest clampdown on the illicit cold medicine market will have an utterly minimal effect on the production, sale and consumption of meth-amphetamine in New Zealand.

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  90. wat dabney (3,439 comments) says:

    I should have been clearer ,”shoot the fuckers” relates to the big time traffickers.The importers,manufacturers, distributors.

    Can you be even clearer and confirm that this includes the importers, manufacturers and distributors of alcohol?

    (I assume it does because, let’s face it, if you’re demanding that the one be shot and the other protected by the state you’d have to be a complete simpleton; someone who lets the state do his thinking for him.)

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  91. hj (5,677 comments) says:

    DEFINING IDENTITY AND CREATING CITIZENS :
    THE MEDIA AND IMMIGRANTS IN NEW ZEALAND

    THE MEDIA AND IMMIGRANTS

    The literature concerning minorities and the media, both indigenous and ethnic
    communities, is considerable (eg Spoonley and Hirsh, 1990; Cottle, 2000; Twitchin,
    1988). But there is a much smaller literature which deals specifically with immigrants
    and the media (Barker, 1999; Wood and King, 2001), especially in a New Zealand
    context. However, there is some interesting material, from New Zealand and elsewhere,
    which examines the values of the media, both as particular occupational groups (eg
    journalists, producers, editors), and as media organisations (see Mahtani, 2001; Abel,
    1997; McGregor and Comrie, 2002; Barker, 1999; Jakubowicz, 1994).
    Van Dijk (1993) has been influential, both in terms of the use of a particular methodology
    (content analysis) and the advocacy of a particular approach to the media’s role in
    influencing intergroup relations and imagery. In his use of content analysis, he has been
    concerned with both surface representation and underlying meanings (Mahtani,
    2001:109). For him, the media have constructed and reproduced racism (Van Dijk, 1993:
    279):

    Discourse and the denial of racism

    Teun A. van Dijk
    UNIVERSITY OF AMSTERDAM

    The guiding idea behind this research is that ethnic and racial prejudices are prominently acquired and shared within the white dominant group through everyday conversation and institutional text and talk.
    ….
    It is further assumed in this research programme that talk and text about
    minorities, immigrants, refugees or, more generally, about people of col- our or Third World peoples and nations, also have broader societal, politi- cal and cultural functions. Besides positive self-presentation and negative other-presentation, such discourse signals group membership, white ingroup allegiances and, more generally, the various conditions for the reproduction of the white group and their dominance in virtually all social, political and cultural domains.

    DEFINING IDENTITY AND CREATING CITIZENS :
    THE MEDIA AND IMMIGRANTS IN NEW ZEALAND Distiguished professor Paul Spoonley

    Winston Peters and New Zealand First : Politicising Immigration
    In reviewing the decade, and the coverage of immigration issues in the print media, it is
    the dominant role played by Winston Peters in defining and generating debate which
    stands out in the New Zealand context. It is particularly noticeable during the 1996 and
    2002 election campaigns. There are some aspects which characterise both Winston
    Peters’ contribution and the relationship of many in the media to him.
    The first aspect is the politicisation of immigration. This is hardly new, both in terms of a
    distant past (the anti-Asian politics of the 1890s through to the 1920s) or a more recent
    past. There have been periodic attempts to characterise and criticise immigrants,
    including those most culturally like Pakeha, such as the “bash a Pom” campaigns of the
    mid-1970s. In the post-war period, however, the pre-eminent and most sustained
    campaign involved the immigration and settlement of Pacific peoples, often
    indiscriminately (the fact that Cook Islanders, Niueans and Tokelauans were New
    Zealand citizens was often ignored or not understood). In the wake of growing economic
    problems after the 1973 oil crises, Pacific peoples were defined as being a threat to law
    and order, as competing for various resources such as jobs, education and health services,
    and as “overstayers” (see Spoonley and Hirsh, 1990). The intensity of the concern, voiced
    by politicians (Labour and National), representatives of government agencies such as the
    police and immigration, and the public, combined with the racialisation of Pacific peoples
    (ie defining them as problems in terms of the “normal” functioning of New Zealand
    society) justifies labelling the response to their immigration and settlement as a moral
    panic. A similar moral panic occurred in the mid-1990s.

    http://canada.metropolis.net/events/metropolis_presents/media_diversity/Spoonley%20%28Eng%29.pdf

    Note immigration is never a problem. It is only a problem because whites are trying to remain dominant (that’s the distinguished professors thesis).

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  92. hj (5,677 comments) says:

    Edit
    Note immigration is never a problem. It is only a problem because whites are trying to remain dominant (that’s the distinguished professors thesis).
    Another way of looking at it is that people from bloated failed overpopulated states seek a better life in states that dont suffer their disease.

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  93. hj (5,677 comments) says:

    “Populist politicians seized the opportunity by playing the race card during general election times, and immigration has remained a hot topic in New Zealand consciousness ever since. In spite of popular outcry of “too many Asians” and sporadic attempts by the government to tweak immigration policies to achieve a more ideal racial mix in the name of social cohesion, there is little likelihood of New Zealand ever closing its doors again.

    Although the adoption of a colorblind universal immigration policy was rather tentative and lacking in long-term planning, it was propelled by a clear realization that New Zealand needed to reposition itself from being on the Pacific fringe to being a more active participant in an increasingly globalized world. The first step toward global participation was engagement with Asia as a close neighbor. It is against this policy background that Chinese immigration to New Zealand should be examined.”

    http://www.migrationinformation.org/feature/display.cfm?ID=878
    ……………………
    Japan positioned it self well but it didn’t need mass migration.

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  94. hj (5,677 comments) says:

    I posted the above because migrants are presented 90% of the time in our media as the best thing since sliced bread whereas objectors are xenophobic or racist.

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