Hooton on rejuvenation

December 14th, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

writes in NBR:

In Mr Key’s cabinet, only Mr McCully entered Parliament before the 1990s. A quarter of his cabinet – Mr Joyce, Mr Bridges, Ms Kaye, Hekia Parata and Amy Adams – is from the class of 2008. Treaty of Waitangi and international trade specialists Chris Finlayson and Tim Groser have only been around since 2005. The same is true of Welfare Minister Paula Bennett and Defence Minister Jonathan Coleman.

Of today’s cabinet, only Bill English, Tony Ryall, Nick Smith and Mr McCully were part of the government of the 1990s and the first three only towards the end. Of them, only Mr McCully was a genuine supporter of the Bolger/Richardson regime. One of the most important factors in Mr Key’s success is that his government was genuinely new and it has kept renewing over its five years.

In contrast, two of the top performers in David Cunliffe’s opposition, Phil Goff and Annette King, were ministers in the Lange/Palmer/Moore government of the 1980s. Ruth Dyson was party president during that era, and Maryan Street in the early 1990s. Mr Cunliffe and his deputy David Parker were two of Helen Clark’s favourite ministers, while Grant Robertson and Jacinda Ardern were on her staff. Party strategist Trevor Mallard first became an MP in 1984, before even Mr McCully. The only confirmed retirement for next year is its racing spokesman, Ross Robertson.

Labour is still very dominated by the past.

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50 Responses to “Hooton on rejuvenation”

  1. thor42 (971 comments) says:

    “Labour is still very dominated by the past.”

    Very much so.

    Add the likes of Darien Fenton and Sue Moroney to the list of already-mentioned hacks and you have a line-up guaranteed to “inspire” anyone to put a rope and an exposed beam to use.

    The good news for the Nats is that every time Cunners does that insincere “smile” of his, he just *screams* “used-car salesman” and another 0.1 percent of Labour supporters defect to the Nats.

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  2. OneTrack (3,121 comments) says:

    “Labour is still very dominated by the past.”

    You mean the neo-lib mid-eighties, or the union dominated 70s (must just about time for the Cook Strait ferries to go on strike), the totalitarian nightmare of 50’s East Germany, the pogroms of the Soviet twenties or closer to home, 1840?

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  3. Michael (910 comments) says:

    When being an MP is the highest paid job you’ve ever had, or ever likely to have then the incentive is to stay on for as long as you can.

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  4. Keeping Stock (10,342 comments) says:

    The issue for David Cunliffe is that he will have all sorts of fights on his hands if he tries to squeeze a few MP’s out when he cannot promise them cushy post-Parliament jobs as he could if he were in government. Add to that the fact that a good number of Labour MP’s have no significant work experience outside of politics and union affairs.

    On the other hand John Key has been able to convince around 15% of his caucus (so far) to move on next year without a drop of blood being spilt. Cunliffe must look on in envy; they may have even had a chat about it en route to or from South Africa :D

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  5. Johnboy (16,722 comments) says:

    Ruth may have to stay on till she can afford a support bra. :)

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  6. martinh (1,257 comments) says:

    Annette King gives me the shivers, what a fat troughing pig

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  7. Johnboy (16,722 comments) says:

    Show some respect martinh.

    What political party other than Liarbour could raise a failed dental nurse to the heights of Minister of Health! :)

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  8. martinh (1,257 comments) says:

    Ha a failed dental nurse, they really get the over achievers in that party

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  9. Johnboy (16,722 comments) says:

    She was once the member for Horuwhenua if that is a gold star on her CV! :)

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  10. Manolo (13,840 comments) says:

    All it matters is an election win, and the socialists believe they can afford to run a campaign with those dinosaurs, read leeches. I hope it doesn’t come to pass.

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  11. Simon (728 comments) says:

    Bolger/Richardson regime. The last time NZ had a semi responsible government. It certainly had many faults but at least a govt that tried to operate in the real world. Bolger muddled along after Richardson left.

    Since 1999 NZ has had two shit governments. NZ society basically kept going due to massive credit growth and mass immigration.

    Take credit growth and immigration out of the last 15 yrs and NZ would have collapsed under the shit weight of the State long ago.

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  12. coolas (115 comments) says:

    Would have thought Gerry Brownlie was too big to forget from Hooton’s list.
    Elected to Ilam in 1996 was he not?

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  13. Johnboy (16,722 comments) says:

    Much as we hate it Manolo. Barring a miracle it will come to pass in 2014.

    Be staunch and the world will be ours again in say 2023! :)

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  14. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (891 comments) says:

    So what bro? John Key is still going to be smashed by the oldies of Cunliffe…nobody can stop a Labour government forming in 2014 now…..

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  15. Shazzadude (529 comments) says:

    again, Hooton continues to use selective logic. He uses “in cabinet” so he can avoid pointing out that current minister Maurice Williamson was also there in the 1980s. He’s also keen to point out that Maryan Street was party president in the 90s, but avoids to point out that National MP Lindsay Tisch was a party president even earlier than her, in 1994!

    I think currently both parties are fairly evenly matched in the rejuvenation department. For every Simon Bridges or a Paula Bennett you have a Jacinda Ardern or a Chris Hipkins on the other side.

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  16. Dennis Horne (2,403 comments) says:

    Rooted in the past; rooted in the future.

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  17. Johnboy (16,722 comments) says:

    Rooting is good whenever you do it Dennis.

    Regard every root as your last one. Put in maximum effort and you can’t go wrong! :)

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  18. Johnboy (16,722 comments) says:

    If you haven’t got a woman handy wanking makes a good substitute Dennis! :)

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  19. Liberty (267 comments) says:

    “Bolger muddled along after Richardson left.”
    Ruth had the economy heading in the right direction and Bolger had a cup of tea crawled into bed with Winston.
    If Bolger had been a real leader he would have told Winston to F%^K off

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  20. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    Liberty I feel compelled to remind you that politics is the art of the possible .Ruthless and her hatchet faced accomplice(crony) ,you know ,the one with a face like a bull dog eating porridge,Shipwreck , were unsaleable.Since when does a kinder garden teacher with a hubby who inherited the family farm ,get to lecture the rest of us on what a bunch of slack arses we are .Only in your fucken parallel universe you sad sack of shit

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  21. Zapper (1,021 comments) says:

    Mark Craig, we usually go with English here

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  22. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    Which word(s) didn’t you understand,I am standing by to translate cookie boy ,ah I think I have it ,most of the cognoscenti,will know Shipwreck refers to Jennifer Shipley dear boy.Now smarten up concentrate and pay attention

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  23. Keeping Stock (10,342 comments) says:

    @ Mark Craig – I’d get that anger seen to if I were you. You only have to look at Max Dillon Coyle to see what naked anger can do for the soul if it is not dealt with.

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  24. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    oi too Zipper Zapper address the salient point I made,those wot inherit their wealth and position a la Dougie Myers and all their coattailers can go take a running jump. I have a great deal of respect and admiration for the genuine entrepreneurs that endeavour to make our economic base bigger and better but those that sell out to have the profits shipped overseas are traitors to our national interest .When we take over and I am a Colonel ,these people will be hunted down ,prosecuted and end up making large rocks smaller by way of largish sledge hammers ,after which time they will truly be able to discourse on the value and worth of hard work .Hard work is done by those on the end of hammers ,chain saws, pneumatiic drills ,that type of stuff.The day will come when the bullshit hard work most of the right wing nuts rabbit on about is seen for what it is,zero game stuff ,smoke, mirrors ,flannel and waffle.

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  25. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    Yeah, those neoliberal hacks from the 80s need to go.

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  26. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    Hard work is done by those on the end of hammers ,chain saws, pneumatiic drills ,that type of stuff.The day will come when the bullshit hard work most of the right wing nuts rabbit on about is seen for what it is,zero game stuff ,smoke, mirrors ,flannel and waffle

    Hear, hear.

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  27. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    There you go again KS,you just cannot see self evident truths,right under your nose,.Non withstanding ,please do not mis interpret steely determination for anger,actually sorrow is closer to how I feel for the young people of our great little country.
    And I guess it stems from the knowledge that thousands upon thousands of our (younger) folk have shipped out to greener pastures since the advent of the Rogernomic(Ruthanasia) revololution.The tragedy is that you sadder right wing plonkers have gleefully thrown the baby out with the bath water. Forgive them Lord they know not what they do .

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  28. ZenTiger (435 comments) says:

    Yeah, bring back Darren Hughes.

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  29. Sponge (184 comments) says:

    “Hard work is done by those on the end of hammers ,chain saws, pneumatiic drills ,that type of stuff.”

    That is one of the most profoundly stupid posts that I have ever seen. While I do not toil on a machine I do work hard. Very hard. I suspect you have never had t do genuine hard work Mark.

    Are you student by any chance?

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  30. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    Sponge (69 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 12:15 am

    “Hard work is done by those on the end of hammers ,chain saws, pneumatiic drills ,that type of stuff.”

    That is one of the most profoundly stupid posts that I have ever seen. While I do not toil on a machine I do work hard. Very hard. I suspect you have never had t do genuine hard work Mark.

    “Any man who contemplates writing a book or engaging in any forms of preaching or propaganda should be obliged to do an hours digging or other outdoor work before breakfast. By that time breakfast would be such a delight that throughout the rest of the day he would be incapable of thinking that all is vanity.
    Those who resisted this regimen and still remained pessimistic should be subjected to something more severe: they should be allowed only an apple and a glass of milk for their breakfast and should be compelled to do outdoor physical exercise until midday. After the midday meal most of them would fall asleep, but the few who remained awake might write books worth reading.”
    Bertrand Russell, Mortals and Others, American Essays. 27 April 1932.

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  31. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    Sponge (69 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 12:15 am

    While I do not toil on a machine I do work hard. Very hard.

    Doing what?

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  32. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    Hard work is done by those on the end of hammers ,chain saws, pneumatiic drills ,that type of stuff.

    Reminds me of a Mrs Krabappel quotation: “As you know, Bart, one day your permanent record will disqualify you from all but the hottest and noisiest jobs.”

    Our student friend seems to imagine there is something romantic about hard physical labour. There isn’t.

    Incidentally, we know he’s a student because he comes out with such fascist classics as “those that sell out to have the profits shipped overseas are traitors to our national interest.”

    The day will come when the bullshit hard work most of the right wing nuts rabbit on about is seen for what it is,zero game stuff

    Clearly free trade is never zero sum. Indeed, it is a cornerstone of our amazing standard of living.

    You might want to stop wanking ten times a day and pick up a book, son.

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  33. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    Good morning Mr daubney.i would wager I have read a fair few more books than you.Unlike you I have a need to carefully weigh up all viewpoints and perspectives!and I will read and re read to get as much as I can out of the text .To this end I have read Atlas Shrugged 3 times and The Foutainhead the same number .i confess a degree of admiration for Roarke. However I have also read The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists a few times,as well as Only Their Purpose is Mad by Bruce Jesson.
    I have 400 books at home and membership of 2 libraries.Have a nice day

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  34. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    wat dabney (3,116 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 7:47 am

    “The day will come when the bullshit hard work most of the right wing nuts rabbit on about is seen for what it is,zero game stuff”

    Are you one of those suits that takes from rather than contributes to New Zealand’s economy, Wat? It’s just your sensitivity to something large swathes of us regard as so banal that it hardly seems worth commenting on is revealing. Do you work in a bank, Wat?

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  35. greenjacket (467 comments) says:

    But Labour have rejuvenated – they gained Poto Williams.

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  36. greenjacket (467 comments) says:

    OT: Mark Craig – it helps to write in English if you want to be an effective commentator. Ad hominem attacks and threats of violence say more about you than they do to address the subject.

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  37. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    greenjacket (271 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 11:27 am

    “… and threats of violence say more about you than they do to address the subject.”

    Er, Mark Craig’s ‘threat of violence’ was to suggest those in the professional classes acting as mercenaries for foreign corporate interests should be forced to work in the sort of physically demanding jobs to which manual labourers are accustomed.

    Mark Craig:

    When we take over and I am a Colonel ,these people will be hunted down ,prosecuted and end up making large rocks smaller by way of largish sledge hammers ,after which time they will truly be able to discourse on the value and worth of hard work

    The suggestion that members of the professional class being forced to carry out acts of manual labour is a form of violence says more about you, Greenjacket, than it does about Mark Craig.

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  38. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    I have 400 books at home and membership of 2 libraries.

    Bless.

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  39. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    It would appear that ad hominem attacks are only allowable when they are perpetrated by the right on the left.The colonel comment was I thought an attempt at wit, we’ll I was half right.I am not a violent person, I am not a student .
    Oh that I could pull myself to bits 10 times a day, a stroke has put paid to that
    Wat this free trade caper has put a lot of my friends out of business and work,engineering businesses,clothing footwear,furniture all gone ,houses lost ,marriages destroyed,all sacrificed on the Altar of a faulty economic policy.
    I read somewhere that Walmart lands a40 foot container from china every minute of every day and that America is in hock for about $16 trillion or so .How is it working out Wat and pray tell how on earth are they going to pay it back.
    I am pretty sure that I heard Bill English say last week that we are $75 Billion in debt,how and when will we pay that back
    I stand by waiting for your reply.
    Cheers

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  40. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    Yoza,

    Are you one of those suits that takes from rather than contributes to New Zealand’s economy, Wat?

    You mean do I work in the coercive (state) sector?

    No I don’t. I work in the cooperative sector.

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  41. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    Thanks for the tail gunning effort Yoza.I am a very slow typist ,and cannot respond in a timely fashion.
    Keep throwing plenty of leathet

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  42. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    wat dabney (3,119 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 12:10 pm
    Yoza,

    No I don’t. I work in the cooperative sector.

    There really was no need to reply, Wat, it is patently obvious from your history of commenting on Kiwiblog that you are not a member of the productive classes, but a proponent of society’s parasitic superstructure.

    Mark Craig (13 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 12:17 pm

    Thanks for the tail gunning effort Yoza. …

    No worries, mate. This lot provide me with hours of entertainment on a regular basis. I wouldn’t be here if I didn’t enjoy myself.

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  43. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    “this free trade caper has put a lot of my friends out of business and work,engineering businesses,clothing footwear,furniture all gone

    Because the plural of anecdote is data, right?

    What of all the jobs created here thanks to economic freedom? Do you imagine that more-closed economies don’t have unemployment? Do you suppose that people in such countries can’t easily match your stories with vastly more of their own, and all made worse because of their local poverty? On the contrary, the evidence is that the more open the economy the lower the general unemployment.

    “According to our regression results, more economic free dom appears to reduce unemployment. The magnitude of the effect seems to be substantial, especially among young people. Given the substantial costs of unemployment and the enormous number of jobless people worldwide, particularly in the wake of the current financial and economic crisis, governments should consider increasing economic freedom as a means of reducing unemployment.”

    http://www.bath.ac.uk/economics/staff/horst-feldmann/feldmann-2010-economic-freedom-and-unemployment.pdf

    (That’s just one paper, but others reach similar conclusions.)

    And what about all those people put out of work through technological progress? What of all the farriers and the buggy-whip manufacturers? The effect is entirely the same. Are you suggesting that the NZ goverment ban technology in order to assist a few special-interest groups?

    Your bar-stool economic analysis is completely worthless, as you fail to consider both the seen and the unseen.

    Free trade gives us lower unemployment and a vastly increased standard of living.

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  44. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    There really was no need to reply, Wat, it is patently obvious from your history of commenting on Kiwiblog that you are not a member of the productive classes, but a proponent of society’s parasitic superstructure.

    You don’t appear to have read my last reply. I work in the cooperative sector; in a very competitive sector actually. We keep our jobs by providing our customers with the best possible goods and services at the cheapest possible price.

    I understand that a competitive free market benefits customers, not providers.

    If you wish to discuss society’s parasitic superstructure then let’s talk about powerful special-interest groups like the state-sector cartels and their Labour Party vehicle, which exists to plunder and exploit the genuine workers.

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  45. Yoza (1,879 comments) says:

    wat dabney (3,121 comments) says:
    December 15th, 2013 at 12:53 pm

    You don’t appear to have read my last reply. I work in the cooperative sector; in a very competitive sector actually. We keep our jobs by providing our customers with the best possible goods and services at the cheapest possible price.

    I understand that a competitive free market benefits customers, not providers.

    ‘Free markets’ benefit huge corporations as local producers and manufacturers are incapable of competing with the ability of multi-national conglomerates to ‘aggress’ local tax laws, move production to low-wage/low human-rights threshold economies, blackmail governments to provide infrastructure and subsidies (how much did the Key government pay to keep that aluminium smelter going?), threaten to sue governments that do not acquiesce to increasingly unrealistic demands, flood foreign markets with goods produced in their domestic markets with government subsidies (the US being one of the worst proponents of this practice).

    The word ‘freemarket’ is a euphemism for what more and more are describing as mafia capitalism.

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  46. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    Yoza,

    You seem totally confused about free markets, since your discourse consists largely of examples of non-free markets.

    Perhaps you should borrow one of Mark’s 400 books, or one of his library tickets?

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  47. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    Um Wat with the greatest of respect I am trying to address all of the points as they arise .I am accused of not reading ,I read a shit load of books ,from left right and centre view points,crikey my daughter was a rare book dealer for many years,I got to read you will be pleased to know an original signed copy of Mein Kamph.I have taken it as read that his is where your economic inspiration comes from .
    I try to refute the allegation that I am an unread doofus and that elicits a scornful response,bless. Anyway stop being a woos and address the main issue ,how in this brave new world do we pay our way.Non withstanding record dairy prices and this years projected milk solids payout ,please give me and other interested citizens your take on how this whole current account deficit scenario will play out .Please stop your ad hominem attacks and enlighten us as to our future economic salvation .
    Further ,english is my native tongue ,I guess I credited some of the more cretinous knuckle draggers here with ability to read between the lines ,as I am a very slow typist.
    I have not posted on this site for a long time ,on and off I have followed ,the general right wing craziness.since 2004 and back then I was threatened with a well polished brogue up my fundamental (virginal) orifice.
    By the way what happenned to Gooner ,Finkeltstein Cactus and the other loopies .
    Things have not changed that much ,if you retaliate you get threatened with a yellow or red card,it would appear however apart from Red Baiter who was just so OTT only lefties get the flick .

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  48. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    Mark,

    It’s one thing to read books, it’s quite another to actually understand them and take lessons from them.

    I got to read you will be pleased to know an original signed copy of Mein Kamph.I have taken it as read that his is where your economic inspiration comes from .

    On the contrary, you are the one propounding Nazi-style economics:

    Mercantilism was a policy followed by empires, especially in the 17th and 18th centuries, forbidding or limiting trade outside the empire. In the 1930s, autarky as a policy goal was sought by Nazi Germany, which maximized trade within its economic bloc and minimized external trade

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autarky

    A large trade deficit seemed almost inevitable. But Hitler found this prospect unacceptable. Thus Germany, following Italy’s lead, began to move away from partially free trade in the direction of economic self-sufficiency.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Nazi_Germany

    Hey, perhaps you did learn something from one of your 400 books after all!

    You just got completely the wrong end of the stick is all.

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  49. Mark Craig (31 comments) says:

    Wat thank you for your considered and researched response .I will address the issues you raise in due course .
    Please though respond to the issues I have raised .I have no personal animosity towards you I just would like to have explained to me how we pay our way .We have had a very open market in NZ since 1984 ,through a lot of it(12 years ) I had up to35 staff in a manufacturing situation ,I fought like fuck to maintain and train staff but was just overwhelmed by the Asian Invasion,call me paternal but I really liked my staff ,they worked their arses off for the company,however it was like trying to turn back the tide.
    In the mean time it seems as though our current account deficit is worsening, at some time the piper will have to be paid.FFS tell me how this is going to be resolved given it has gone on for decades

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  50. wat dabney (3,778 comments) says:

    Mark,

    Are you telling me you’d be any happier if a local competitor rather than a Chinese one put you out of business, or someone invented a machine which had rendered those workers superfluous? How many hundreds of thousands of jobs have been lost over the years due to automation and computerisation? It’s no different from free trade.

    And if your business or sector deserves special protection – which amounts to physical coercion of the rest of us – why doesn’t everyone else’s? We’d revert to grinding poverty.

    These workers and their children benefit to an incredible amount from free trade, even accounting for occasional periods of unemployment. Cheap consumer goods are just the start of it. And they have grown up with free education in a rich country which offers any number of opportunities. I have to say I have far more sympathy for the poor Chinese workers trying to provide for their families and give their childen the chance of something better.

    We all of us choose to participate in the “free” market for the incredible riches it delivers to us and our families. None of us opts instead for the three acres and a cow. In doing so we accept that we will may be unemployed sometimes. (And the same wealth we get from free trade pays for social welfare, so losing a job in a rich western country is in no way to be compared to losing it in the Third World.)

    In the mean time it seems as though our current account deficit is worsening, at some time the piper will have to be paid.FFS tell me how this is going to be resolved given it has gone on for decades

    The current account deficit is not debt.

    http://www.fee.org/the_freeman/detail/a-deficit-of-understanding

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