NZ remains least corrupt country

December 6th, 2013 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

Transparency International has found the NZ public sector remains the least corrupt in the world. The top 10 countries are (100 means perfect):

  • New Zealand 91/100 (+1)
  • Denmark 91 (+1)
  • Finland 89 (-1)
  • Sweden 89(+1)
  • Norway 86 (+1)
  • Singapore 86 (-1)
  • Switzerland 85 (-1)
  • Netherlands 83 (-1)
  • Australia 81 (-4)
  • Canada 81 (-3)

At the bottom is Afghanistan, Somalia and North Korea on 8.

Tags: ,

63 Responses to “NZ remains least corrupt country”

  1. Longknives (4,953 comments) says:

    Expect to hear from Penny in 3.2.1…..

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. big bruv (14,217 comments) says:

    We remain the least corrupt even allowing for Penny’s refusal to pay her rates and water bill??????

    Vote: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. alex Masterley (1,535 comments) says:

    Yup cue Penny…

    Vote: Thumb up 12 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Shazzadude (531 comments) says:

    Does anyone know what the calculations are for determining this?

    It’d be interesting to know why Australia’s quite a bit below us.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Camryn (481 comments) says:

    @Shazzadude – I would make the obvious joke about their convict past, but I’d suggest – very carefully – that it could be due to their greater levels of immigration from cultures where corruption is more normalized and that they never really tried to reform their unions.

    (Aside: Finally, after 10 years, I reach 500 posts… and, as suggested by the average of only about 1 a week, they’ve all been gold… pure gold. You’re all welcome.)

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. lazza (401 comments) says:

    “Least Corrupt”. Oh! OK … though every measure like this one is “relative”.

    We no doubt soundly beat the Central African Republic on this scale, of course … but lets not get too cockahoop.

    Try Kiwi Finance Companies, Cricket players and our Councils … the latter continue to runamuck while their auditors go… “Move on now … Nothing to see here … Oh Shite! … now how did that! (Kaipara) happen?”

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Simon (780 comments) says:

    They need reports from all around the world. Easy money writing reports for these fools.

    Does anyone know who to give a kick back to get on their payroll? (ofcourse I would outsource the actual report writing to China)

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. Simon (780 comments) says:

    Also well done for the Far Left North Korea scoring 8. No idea how the managed to score a point.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. simpleton1 (243 comments) says:

    So long as all payments are legitimate, the “i”s dotted the “t”s crossed as per waitangi treaty, RMA, “iwi earthworks monitors” ( in the previous KB post) koha and gifts, auditor general’s ok , electoral commission’s ok, etc. then how can corruption even happen in NZ

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    Some of those scores don’t seem realistic? I wonder what their methodology is?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. NeutralObserver (97 comments) says:

    Congratulations to the NZ public service. Something to be very proud of, hard won and easily lost.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. Nuwanda (83 comments) says:

    “So long as all payments are legitimate… then how can corruption even happen in NZ”

    That’s the nub of it. If the NZ government bails out a failing company or makes huge transfers of wealth from one sector of the economy to another, you could certainly say those things don’t involve corruption because they were authorized by and conducted with full legal authority.

    If you disagreed with bailouts and robbing Peter to pay Paul you’d certainly describe the legal powers that allow such things as very corrupt indeed. And you’d describe people who advocated such laws to be corrupt themselves.

    Unfortunately we’ve come to believe, and indeed have been taught, that it’s right if the law says it’s right and wrong if the law says it’s wrong. Under that mindset corruption takes on a very different meaning.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. Nigel Kearney (1,096 comments) says:

    In corrupt countries you have to pay money to an official in order to get a building consent. We should be proud to live in non-corrupt New Zealand, where you still have to pay money to officials but may or may not be granted a building consent.

    Vote: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. Kea (13,554 comments) says:

    Those rankings are RACIST !!!

    Inspite of making up about 10% of the worlds population, European dominated countries make up 100% of the least corrupt countries.

    Thats RACIST !!! :)

    Vote: Thumb up 10 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. Kea (13,554 comments) says:

    Nigel Kearney , all jokes aside you make a valid point.

    Pay-offs are just a cost of doing business in many places. I have often wondered if out regulatory costs and delays are the more expensive option. It is certainly easier to set up business in many less corrupt countries.

    Also the ongoing cost of “protection” is probably less than our taxes and government demands.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. Don the Kiwi (1,808 comments) says:

    “Transparency International has found the NZ public sector remains the least corrupt in the world”

    Just wait till Labour get onto the treasury benches.

    Helen Klark’s government was the most corrupt in our history – I don’t have to go through the list – I’m sure everyone remembers. I wonder how the score was in the day of her despotism?

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. F E Smith (3,307 comments) says:

    It’d be interesting to know why Australia’s quite a bit below us.

    Because the levels of corruption in Australia are quite astonishing.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. hmmokrightitis (1,596 comments) says:

    Worked in Indonesia for a while, running a piece of work for HP. The in-country CEO, an ex-pat, had a body guard, all the ex-pat leadership team did. Best paid job around, paid $USD 500 a month.

    Trouble was the CEO pissed someone off. Someone paid the guard $USD 5000 to shoot the CEO. Now THATS corruption.

    You listening you batshit crazy woman? Pay your rates and water bills, THEN you might have some shred of credibility.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. JMS (368 comments) says:

    When it comes to bribery, embezzelment and extortion, I’m sure NZ is one of the least corrupt.
    Though we wouldn’t have done so well if Transparency International had taken a closer look at the corruption in our ‘compliance sector’.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. jackinabox (776 comments) says:

    Anyone who reckons the NZ Police aren’t corrupt knows fuck all!

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 7 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. Akaroa (613 comments) says:

    My response to this veritable earth-shattering revelation is:

    “And? Your point being?”

    One day New Zealand as a Nation will reach adulthood. Roll on that day say I!

    Then, thankfully, we may see no more of these, “Look at Little Old Us!! Aren’t we just the Greatest?”, claims.

    Don’t people realise that such utterances are just another sign of immaturity?

    When I first came to this fine land forty years ago I worked with a guy one of who’s catch-phrases was “Not bad for a small country, eh?’

    He’d trot it out at every opportunity when NZ was, in some feature or activity, shown to be…….. just like everywhere else!!

    My response was generally as above!!

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. Tom Barker (150 comments) says:

    “Helen Klark’s government was the most corrupt in our history – I don’t have to go through the list – I’m sure everyone remembers. I wonder how the score was in the day of her despotism?”

    NZ has held its current ranking (1st or 1st-equal), with its current score (91/100) since these records began in 1996. If you have evidence that this country was more corrupt under Labour, then you should supply to Transparency International because they clearly aren’t aware of it. And if you don’t have such evidence, as I suspect, then you are a spineless moron.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 8 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. kowtow (8,936 comments) says:

    In general we do very well and deservedly so.

    However there is no room for complacency.

    We’ve had a few trials recently of police and prison officers taking bribes and now there’s an MP before the courts for campaign funding.
    There’s another case currenty before the courts about rigging votes in the Auckland elections.(Another first for NZ)
    I often wonder at the interrelationship between councils and property developers .

    There is always a danger in not acknowledging that there could be a problem in the first place.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. Dean Papa (784 comments) says:

    The index in question is called the Corruption Perceptions Index. So I wouldn’t be surprised if we voted for ourselves to be the least corrupt country in the world. It makes sense because being honest and corrupt free is an integral part of the Kiwi identity. I recall reading the results of survey, I think it might have been Lonely Planet, where the write up of the results included the amusing titbit that Kiwis had voted for themselves as the most friendly country in the world. So it does happen. Kiwis like to view the country as holding a special place in the world. Take a look as the Banksy donation controversy, for instance. On face value it is pretty darn obvious that Banksy knows who Dotcom is, and that he knowingly received a sizable campaign donation from the big bloke. Yet there are a great many people who want to argue that Banksy did nothing wrong. Now, I believe Banksy is a good and decent man, and that he only did what everyone else was doing. But this only goes to show that many Kiwis will not perceive corruption even when it is plainly present.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. Don the Kiwi (1,808 comments) says:

    “………..and if you don’t have such evidence, as I suspect, then you are a spineless moron.”

    Ruffle some of your lefty, Helen admiring feathers did I Tom Barker.
    If you don’t recall any of her antics to stay in power and rule the roost, you are a brainless moron. Try reading “Absolute Power” by Ian Wishart.

    And before you start attempting to discredit him, rmember that Wishart is arguably the best investigative journalist in this country – he supports all his claims with many verifiable quotations and evidence.

    Vote: Thumb up 8 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. Yoza (1,926 comments) says:

    Transparency International reports are more propaganda than informative:

    Source Watch:

    TI is largely funded by Western governments, and has been accused of biased activities as a result. It has also been accused of lack of transparency in its own activities. … In 2008, TI attracted controversy by claiming in a report entitled Promoting Revenue Transparency that Venezuela’s state-owned oil firm PDVSA had failed to disclose basic financial information such as their revenues and how much royalties they paid, and had not produced properly audited accounts.[3] As a result, the report gave PDVSA the lowest possible ranking in assessing the oil companies in 42 different countries, and ranking them according to whether they were of high, medium or low transparency.[4]

    In fact, the report was incorrect, and all the data was publicly available, leading to claims of a bias by TI against the Venezuelan government.

    When questioned about the apparently biased report, TI initially claimed that information was not available at the time of publication – a claim which was also false – and then refused to answer further questions about the matter.

    The Guardian:

    The international corporate media considers TI to be a reliable source, despite the fact that almost all their funding comes from western governments and big business. The British government is one of the major donors, contributing £1 million in 2007. Other donors include the US government, Shell and Exxon Mobil. … Transparency International denies that they pursue an anti-Chavez agenda. “We are not a political organisation”, their spokesperson told me. Despite this denial, TI’s Venezuela bureau is staffed by opponents of the Venezuelan government (pdf). The directors include Robert Bottome, the publisher of Veneconomia, a strident opposition journal, and Aurelio Concheso of the Centre for the Dissemination of Economic Knowledge, a conservative thinktank funded by the US government. Concheso was previously a director of the employers’ organisation, Fedecamaras. The president of Fedecamaras, Pedro Carmona, led the failed 2002 coup and was briefly installed as Venezuela’s dictator.

    Why would anyone cling to reports released by an organisation that support fascist dictatorships over democratically elected governments?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 10 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. Tom Barker (150 comments) says:

    “he supports all his claims with many verifiable quotations and evidence.”

    All I’m asking is that you do the same.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 6 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. Brian (Shadowfoot) (70 comments) says:

    Did we lose 9 points for bribing the judges?

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. Michaels (1,233 comments) says:

    Where did we lose the 9 points?
    Field?
    Couldn’t be all the Labour members who broke the laws as they were never prosecuted.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. UglyTruth (4,554 comments) says:

    In corrupt countries you have to pay money to an official in order to get a building consent. We should be proud to live in non-corrupt New Zealand, where you still have to pay money to officials but may or may not be granted a building consent.

    My irony meter just broke.

    EDIT: Where’s Penny?

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 3 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. F E Smith (3,307 comments) says:

    Why would anyone cling to reports released by an organisation that support fascist dictatorships over democratically elected governments?

    That has to be the funniest joke made on KB today!!!!

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. Harriet (5,200 comments) says:

    Non-corruption is now the height of public service performance? :cool:

    LOL – it’s simply an expectation of personal standards in the private sector – entry level criteria! :cool:

    This ‘report’ is nothing more than public service corruption itself; a smokescreen for incompetance and general poor performance of public servants world wide! :cool:

    The Conservatives would throw this crap back in the faces of ‘Transperancy International’ and reject this whole transparent truth: international dishonesty! :cool:

    You tax paying mug voters are being taken for fools. Vote for small government. Vote for the Conservatives! :cool:

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  33. lolitasbrother (774 comments) says:

    After a while in Thailand you see the evidence of massive political and bureaucrat corruption.
    Bribery and kick backs are estimated at 20% of the economy, especially Government spending.
    The present Government is a cash paying Government belonging to the Shiniwatra family.
    The money lost could overhaul their education system.
    Their economy about $US550 billion.
    A rake off of even 1% of the economy keeps the in exile dictator Thasksin in control,
    He took tens of billions out of Thailand when he was PM and the people are not even sure if that was a good or bad thing.
    At the level of say paying off a traffic offence it is actually better and cheaper to pay the law than the state .
    The higher up the income bracket you are the more this system works.

    They are having street gatherings over there now, because the people always feel cheated there

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  34. UglyTruth (4,554 comments) says:

    Anyone who reckons the NZ Police aren’t corrupt knows fuck all!

    The police defer to the judges, they won’t arrest a judge even if one admits to committing fraud in their presence.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 6 You need to be logged in to vote
  35. James Stephenson (2,266 comments) says:

    …and you thought “100% Pure New Zealand” was stretching the point from an environmental point if view…

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  36. F E Smith (3,307 comments) says:

    The police defer to the judges, they won’t arrest a judge even if one admits to committing fraud in their presence.

    Well that is false.  I know of two sitting judges and one retired judge who have been prosecuted by Police.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  37. dad4justice (6,594 comments) says:

    our justice system is corrupt and rotten to the core!

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  38. stephieboy (3,519 comments) says:

    dad4justice (7,401 comments) says:
    December 6th, 2013 at 9:18 pm

    In what ways precisely.?

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  39. dad4justice (6,594 comments) says:

    I could give you several thousand examples of judicial corruption but I have not the time or interest in exposing a filthy justice system.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  40. stephieboy (3,519 comments) says:

    A filthy justice system.?
    Then present your evidence please with some examples.?

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  41. dad4justice (6,594 comments) says:

    Examples are endless.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 9 You need to be logged in to vote
  42. KevinH (1,253 comments) says:

    The T.I. ratings place New Zealand in good company with our trusted European friends, people we can do business with and countries that we can grow our economy with. It is a credit to our overworked officials that they have not succumbed to temptation and taken the easy route to prosperity, it is simply not Kiwi to be bent because you will be found out and exposed. The next five years present New Zealand with opportunities to consolidate our position in trade and international markets, these T.I ratings give us the momentum to move ahead with confidence.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  43. stephieboy (3,519 comments) says:

    “Examples are endless, ” ?

    Well start by providing some.?

    Now.!

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  44. scrubone (3,097 comments) says:

    NZ has held its current ranking (1st or 1st-equal), with its current score (91/100) since these records began in 1996. If you have evidence that this country was more corrupt under Labour, then you should supply to Transparency International because they clearly aren’t aware of it. And if you don’t have such evidence, as I suspect, then you are a spineless moron.

    The corruption of the Clark government featured on TI’s homepage in september 2006.
    http://web.archive.org/web/20060926144044/http://www.transparency.org/

    The story is still on their website.
    http://archive.transparency.org/news_room/latest_news/press_releases_nc/2006/2006_09_14_ti_newzealand_parliament

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  45. scrubone (3,097 comments) says:

    stephieboy, there was a case documented in Investigate mag a few years ago – the only aspect of which that reached the rest of the media was the allegation that a bestiality video was played during a police social gathering.

    In the next edition, Wishart noted that a policeman who claimed to be a witness was interviewed on Checkpoint. I heard the interview myself and it could not be more clear that that man was a bent cop. He couldn’t remember even basic details of the incident even though he was there to finger Wishart’s source as the (supposed) actual culprit. I’ve got the articles somewhere but I’m sure it wouldn’t take much to dig them out yourself.

    Then there’s the way that David Benson-Pope was alleged to have mistreated students at his school. It was also revealed that what he was doing was acting out in public to unwilling participants what he had originally acted out in a sex club. But the media considered those allegations too explosive to touch with a barge pole. I actually heard some details of that one first hand, so no, it’s not something made up by Wishart either.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  46. scrubone (3,097 comments) says:

    There are two reasons why this survey isn’t worth a heck of a lot.

    1. It’s ranked. If we’re at the top, that could merely mean we’re the best of a bad bunch.
    2. It’s perception. If we’re at the top, that merely means that people think we’re not corrupt.

    Sure, it gives an idea. But as noted above people love the idea we have no corruption, so when they see it they don’t see it for what it is. So when it does appear, people dismiss it because “it doesn’t happen here”.

    So while the Aussies have had police corruption issues, that’s because they turned around and had a serious inquiry into the matter. We have never done that, and I think that’s a serious mistake no matter what our actual level is.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  47. stephieboy (3,519 comments) says:

    scrubone (2,847 comments) says:
    December 6th, 2013 at 9:57 pm

    All you present are allegations.Am actually thinking of questions like Judges accepting bribes ,Politicians trying to influence a trials outcome , Jury tampering by officials etc. David Benson- Pope may or may of not being a sex fiend but this is per se is hardly evidence of corruption.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  48. jocko (110 comments) says:

    This is amazing. A health warning is necessary.
    For the last year or so I’ve been following the changing Wikipedia site http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corruption_in_New_Zealand.
    I’m guessing it’s written/periodically edited by the SFO (?).
    It surely provides a significant counter-view to the latest TI commentary….BUT the article has steadily been ‘cleansed’ of certain adverse comments e.g. on Politicians – nothing now about the Electoral Finance Act, Taito Field, no prosecutions by the Police under the Electoral Act on obvious illegalities,….and so on – all forms of egregious corruption for personal/political benefit; barely a reference about Local Council corruption of various forms around the country e.g. zoning, accounting, etc.; lack of SFO regulatory investigation of blatant failures to investigate serious Financial Trust Company corporate governance issues despite staff recommendations to, for instance, the Securities Commission….on-referred to the SFO for their review; various Union activities featuring (apparent) corrupt activities…Readers will surely add other generic examples.

    What’s clearly required to help achieve a corruption-free environment, visible to all – but not (yet?) recommended – is a completely independent quasi-judicial Anti-Corruption Commission, as in Australia.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  49. hj (7,156 comments) says:

    From a past president of the South Island branch of the Property Council

    “Obviously the developers couldn’t buy the local politicians and public officials off fast enough in Dallas Fort Worth to overcome the zoning impediment – but they have been trying as this article Fed Up: Texas Monthly November 2007 illustrates. It goes on pretty much everywhere of course – but only illustrates how zoning tends to assist in inflating prices and stalling supply responses.

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/BU0711/S00303.htm

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 3 You need to be logged in to vote
  50. Kea (13,554 comments) says:

    Any country that has laws against offense speech is corrupt. No exceptions. Ever. You can not even survey such a place to measure it. NZ is ok in many ways, but is deeply corrupt in ways not measured in the reported survey.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  51. UglyTruth (4,554 comments) says:

    Well that is false. I know of two sitting judges and one retired judge who have been prosecuted by Police.

    I was speaking of crimes committed by judges as part of their court role, not ordinary crimes that anyone can commit.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  52. UglyTruth (4,554 comments) says:

    A filthy justice system.?
    Then present your evidence please with some examples.?

    corrupt (v.)
    mid-14c., “contaminate, impair the purity of,” from Latin corruptus, past participle of corrumpere (see corrupt (adj.)). Late 14c. as “pervert the meaning of,” also “putrefy.” Related: Corrupted; corrupting.
    http://etymonline.com/?term=corrupt

    pervert (v.)
    c.1300 (transitive), “to turn someone aside from a right religious belief to a false or erroneous one,” from Old French pervertir “pervert, undo, destroy” (12c.) and directly from Latin pervertere “overthrow, overturn,” figuratively “to corrupt, subvert, abuse,” literally “turn the wrong way, turn about,” from per- “away” (see per) + vertere “to turn” (see versus).
    http://etymonline.com/?term=pervert

    “The whole of the common law is judge made.”
    http://www.pco.parliament.govt.nz/lac-chapter-3

    Alfred … established a code of laws that later became the basis of English Common Law.
    http://www.heritage-history.com/www/heritage.php?Dir=characters&FileName=alfred.php

    The Doom Book, Code of Alfred or Legal Code of Aelfred the Great was the code of laws (“dooms”, laws or judgments) compiled by Alfred the Great (c. 893 AD) from three prior Saxon codes, to which he prefixed the Ten Commandments of Moses and incorporated rules of life from the Mosaic Code and the Christian code of ethics.
    http://stefangillies.wordpress.com/alfred-the-great-legal-code/

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  53. jackinabox (776 comments) says:

    The NZ Police using jailhouse snitch testimony to convict innocent people is filthy evil corruption.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  54. Kea (13,554 comments) says:

    Ugly, so fucking what !

    You do not get to declare what is law by fiat. What they did in 8th century England has nothing to do with 2013 NZ. Our ELECTED representatives make OUR law. Not some hideous English king born into a life of unearned privilege before NZ was even discovered by Maori.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  55. publicwatchdog (3,125 comments) says:

    Seen this Kiwibloggers?

    All happening here in New Zealand – ‘perceived’ to be ‘the least corrupt country in the world’?

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11168490

    SkyCity Casino is at the centre of a $120 million drug bust with key players in the alleged international crime syndicate spending millions of dollars in the VIP lounge.
    …..

    Inquiries by the Weekend Herald can reveal that the 18-month investigation started in the VIP lounge of the casino and police are focusing their attention on the millions of dollars gambled there by several individuals.

    ……

    Report cites link to laundering
    The link between SkyCity and allegations of organised crime gives more ammunition to critics of the Government’s deal with the casino for a $402 million convention centre.

    The Herald revealed last year the casino would get more cashless gambling machines, among other concessions, in return for the convention centre investment.

    The Ticket-In Ticket-Out machines make it easier to launder money, according to a Department of Internal Affairs report released under the Official Information Act.

    Money-laundering in casinos can be done in several ways. One is simply exchanging cash for casino chips, then cashing them in later in the day for a winner’s cheque, although doing this too often can raise suspicions among casino staff. Alternatively, money can be pumped straight into poker machines, which work on a mathematical calculation that the casino will eventually keep 12 per cent of the takings. That means that by spending enough time – and money – someone can recoup up to 88 per cent of the money gambled.

    The Green Party opposes the convention centre deal and last year suggested the casino should pay back the millions of dollars in criminal profits spent there.

    SkyCity chief executive Nigel Morrison said at the time that the Greens’ claims had no substance, and no one was convicted of money-laundering at SkyCity.

    Documents released under the Official Information Act show Justice Ministry officials believed the wording of the money-laundering offence did not meet New Zealand’s international obligations.

    Money-laundering is widely considered to include situations where criminals are prepared to deal with the profits or assets of criminal activity as apparently legitimate income. But court judgments have interpreted the charge to mean the Crown must not only prove that the alleged launderer converted assets from one form to another, but did so with the “very purpose” of “concealing” the property.

    A consequence of that ruling is that underworld figures have been acquitted of money-laundering because they publicly spent millions of dollars in cash or assets derived from serious crime such as drug dealing.

    Justice Minister Judith Collins has signed off on a change to the Crimes Act charge of money-laundering but it has yet to come into force. Official figures show that just 25 per cent of money-laundering prosecutions have been successful. ”

    _______________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Yet OFCANZ did NO ‘due diligence’ on the increased risk of money-laundering arising from the New Zealand Convention Centre Act 2013, despite their ‘stated focus':

    THE STATED FOCUS OF OFCANZ IS ‘MONEY-LAUNDERING’:

    http://www.ofcanz.govt.nz/about-ofcanz/focus-areas
    About OFCANZ

    “Focus areas

    OFCANZ’s focus is:

    New Zealand Adult Gangs – particularly those identified as engaging in the illegal drugs market and serious violence,

    Asian organised crime networks – with particular interest in the money laundering processes associated with these criminal networks.

    Organised crime enablers – a particular emphasis on criminal offending that is aimed at enabling wider national or trans-national organised criminal activity (eg. Money laundering, identity fraud). ”

    The OFCANZ OIA which proves they did no ‘due diligence’ on the increased risk of money-laundering arising from the (now) New Zealand International Convention Centre Act 2013:

    http://www.pennybright4mayor.org.nz/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/SKY-CITY-OFCANZ-OIA-REPLY-NO-DUE-DLIGENCE-RE-MONEY-LAUNDERING-bright-penny-06-c211711-2-sent-reply.pdf

    There is a LOT more to this story, including the role of NZ Prime Minister John Key, and Minister of Economic Development Steven Joyce in the railroading through of what I prefer to call the ‘Sky City Money-Laundering Act’ 2013, – because, in my considered opinion, that is EXACTLY what it is.

    Penny Bright

    ‘Anti-corruption / anti-privatisation Public Watchdog’

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 5 You need to be logged in to vote
  56. labrator (1,851 comments) says:

    Pay your rates ‘Penny’, your posts are worthless as a hypocrite.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 3 You need to be logged in to vote
  57. UglyTruth (4,554 comments) says:

    What they did in 8th century England has nothing to do with 2013 NZ.

    It has everything to do with what is happening today because of the conflict between the rules of the body politic and the law of the land.

    Our ELECTED representatives make OUR law.

    Just because you elect someone to represent you does not mean that they make law, Kea.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  58. keuboi (4 comments) says:

    Sadly, regardless of who we vote in to represent us, there will always be some degree of corruption. The real question is, how much of it will we tolerate?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  59. Kea (13,554 comments) says:

    Just because you elect someone to represent you does not mean that they make law, Kea.

    Parliament is the supreme law-making body. They can remove and make laws as they please.

    It is incredible you do not know even that basic fact.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  60. UglyTruth (4,554 comments) says:

    Parliament is the supreme law-making body.

    Yes, I understand that the law of gravity is likely to be ammended later this year.

    Your secular political system is corrupt to the core.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  61. jackinabox (776 comments) says:

    Bruce Plested is an Auckland grammar old boy, philanthropist and the founder and chairman of one of our biggest freight companies, Mainfreight. He is what people mean when they use terms like pillar of society.

    So when someone like Mr Plested feels strongly enough to write a letter to the media labelling the Independent Police Conduct Authority a sham the Government should be worried.

    So when Police Minister Anne Tolley informed him she would be taking the unprecedented step of referring the matter [roast busters] to the IPCA, his immediate response was: “Fantastic, let’s do it,” says Mr Marshall. “I welcome that and I’m confident the public will be reassured.”

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9491987/Are-the-boys-in-blue-serving-me-and-you

    The IPCA is the bent cop’s best friend.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  62. wikiriwhis business (4,192 comments) says:

    ‘The NZ Police using jailhouse snitch testimony to convict innocent people is filthy evil corruption.’

    True, but police harrassment is a good incentive to get out of poverty.

    Yesterday I attended a free BBQ in Akld City put on by the City Council. The police presence almost matched the attendance. Being from Hamilton I was surprised because I have attended many fixtures in Hamilton where not one police officer was present.

    They managed to cuff one peacefully for probable unpaid fines. An obvious pysch outpatient created a furore with another invidual who was easily seen to be provoked by police to be arrested. One officer pulled out a taser for drama effect.

    All that was obvious is that in most cases poverty causes arrests.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  63. jackinabox (776 comments) says:

    So what you’re confirming wikiriwhis business is that the cops are a pack of provocative cunts?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote