Shanks to retire in January

December 10th, 2013 at 10:55 am by David Farrar

has announced:

Katrina Shanks, List MP based in Ohariu, announced today that she will not be  returning to Parliament in 2014.

“I have decided to take up other opportunities in 2014 and have accepted the role as chief executive of the Funeral Directors Association of New Zealand,” Katrina Shanks said.

“The funeral services sector is facing change – legislative, demographic, and societal, and the association and its members need to be in front of this change. I look forward to the opportunities and challenges the sector has to face.

Very pleased for Katrina that she has found an executive role. And she’s in an industry that is recession proof :-)

Her place in Parliament will be offered to the No 64 on National’s list – Joanne Hayes.

Jo’s election bio was:

Joanne was born and raised in the farming sector and is of Maori and Scots descent. Married to Pat a farmer, they have raised two sons who have now left home. 

Graduating from Massey University in 1996 with a Bachelor of Science degree, Joanne returned to extramural studies in 2007 studying towards a Master’s in Business Administration. 

Joanne has worked in a number of industries that include; education, local government, health and social services yet it is her 11 year tenure in the health sector at both NGO and DHB levels that she is most proud of while adding social services and health auditing to her set of executive management expertise. 

She stood in Dunedin South in 2011, and while she did not win the safe Labour seat, National won the party vote by an unprecedented 5%.

Hayes has confirmed she will become an MP, after Paul Quinn declined again.

Incidentially with Williams and Hayes both replacing non-Maori MPs, the number of MPs in Parliament of Maori descent is a record 25 out of 121, or 21% of Parliament. That is a significant over-representation. The makeup of the Maori MPs in Parliament is:

  • Maori seats 7
  • General seats 6
  • List seats 12

Very very hard to claim you need the Maori seats to continue, to maintain effective Maori representation in Parliament.

The breakdown of the 25 Maori MPs is also interesting:

  • National 9
  • Labour 7
  • Greens 3
  • Maori 3
  • NZ First 1
  • Mana 1
  • Independent 1
Tags: , ,

32 Responses to “Shanks to retire in January”

  1. thePeoplesFlag (102 comments) says:

    “…I have decided to take up other opportunities in 2014 and have accepted the role as chief executive of the Funeral Directors Association of New Zealand…,”

    presumably she sees a fat fee in burying the National party after the next election?

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 17 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. Pete George (21,806 comments) says:

    Joanne and her campaign did very well in Dunedin South. I got to know her a bit and wish her well, I think she will be a good addition to the National ranks. I hope she gets a good lift up the list – but whether Labour replace Clare Curran or not Dunedin South will be very interesting next election if Jo has another go here.

    Vote: Thumb up 7 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Changeiscoming (97 comments) says:

    The scary thing about this is Leonie Hapeta is next on the list. With 12 months to go!!

    Please no one else from National leave or get into trouble.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 7 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. big bruv (12,351 comments) says:

    Nice lady but she will not be missed.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Cato (1,094 comments) says:

    I think Joanne is now the chairwoman of the Palmerston North electorate – so she might well stand there in what’s still a fairly marginal seat.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    Her place in Parliament will be offered to the No 64 on National’s list – Joanne Hayes.

    Her place will be offered to the No 56 on National’s list – Paul Quinn. Only if/when he declines will it be offered to Joanne Hayes.

    (assuming both are still party members)

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    Very very hard to claim you need the Maori seats to continue, to maintain effective Maori representation in Parliament.

    I’m not here to make the claim, but it’s a very easy one to make, you just make an assertion about what “effective” means.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 6 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. Brad (75 comments) says:

    “Very very hard to claim you need the Maori seats to continue, to maintain effective Maori representation in Parliament.”

    Sure, if that’s the only claim to retain them. Which it isn’t

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 4 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. Cunningham (746 comments) says:

    thePeoplesFlag (43 comments) says:

    “presumably she sees a fat fee in burying the National party after the next election?”

    Ha I love the arrogance of the left. Have you seen the polls? it is pretty even. i wouldn’t trumpet your arrogant views too much yet buddy.

    Vote: Thumb up 6 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. Monique Angel (229 comments) says:

    Well I guess that’s party vote National and electorate vote to that nice Mr Dunne for the peeps of Ohariu.

    Vote: Thumb up 5 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  11. Alan (910 comments) says:

    Don’t blame her, who’d want the crap that goes with being a back bench MP? She’s clearly been given the word that ministerial office isn’t going to happen.

    There does seem to be rather a lot of them going though, it’s getting past the stage where we can say “renewal”. There’s clearly a group of unhappy people there.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  12. Fisiani (854 comments) says:

    Did you count Paul Foster-Bell as one of the 9 National MP’s of Maori descent.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  13. Manolo (12,624 comments) says:

    Hooooray!

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  14. RRM (8,988 comments) says:

    :lol: LOL – “List MP based in Ohariu” – I find that amusing for some reason.

    “I’m basically a bum on a seat, but I’ll try to pretend I’m a representative of something I’m not, for some reason…”

    Serious question… (Graeme Edgeler or others)

    If list MPs did not actually attend the Parliament, and their party leaders cast votes on their behalf…. would it really matter?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  15. Nigel Kearney (747 comments) says:

    Well I guess that’s party vote National and electorate vote to that nice Mr Dunne for the peeps of Ohariu.

    If people didn’t vote Dunne when Shanks was the alternative, they certainly aren’t going to now.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  16. s.russell (1,486 comments) says:

    If electorate MPs did not actually attend the Parliament, and their party leaders cast votes on their behalf…. would it really matter?
    I think the answer is the same.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  17. David Garrett (5,120 comments) says:

    Brad72: I see you are relatively new here. Welcome to the forum.

    Please do explain what other reason there is to retain the Maori seats if it is not to ensure Maori are represented in parliament at least in proportion to their numbers in the wider population. Serious question.

    DPF: I assume you will now be advocating to your Nat chums the removal of these race based seats – as was the Nats’ policy in 2008?

    alan: You are quite right..the lot of a back bench MP in one of the major parties is not a happy one…”say what we want you to say, when we say it, and dont do or say anything we dont approve of”.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  18. Bob R (1,250 comments) says:

    Indeed Brad, there are also the straightforward reasons of promoting apartheid in New Zealand. More race based laws, please!

    I love that we can celebrate Nelson Mandela for opposing apartheid and race based laws, while defending and promoting race based laws in New Zealand. :)

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  19. alwyn (359 comments) says:

    Graeme Edgeler @ 11.17am
    Paul Quinn must have already declined a list seat.
    He was number 55 on the list and since then Foster-Bell, at 56, and Hauiti, at 63, have already become MPs.
    If you decline the job, as Quinn must have done, would they offer it to you again or do you just get excluded for good?

    [DPF: They offered it to him again, and he has declined it again (or has said he will decline it)]

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  20. David Garrett (5,120 comments) says:

    It is worth reminding readers of the much overlooked Article 3 of the Treaty…those few momentous words which granted Maori all the rights and privileges of British subjects – something very much prized at the time, and something few if any other colonized peoples received.

    And as far as I know, there were no Maori reserved seats on the Legislative Council…Graeme E may know better.

    All around the back corridors of parliament are pictures from the past of old parliaments and Legislative Councils (our former Upper House, abolished in 1950). At a time when Aborigines were not even counted as human in Australian censuses, and black Africans were treated little better than serfs, Maori are notable by their appearance in said old photos of parliaments and Legislative Councils from even before the 20th Century.

    Vote: Thumb up 4 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  21. toad (3,654 comments) says:

    @Alan 11:46 am

    She’s clearly been given the word that ministerial office isn’t going to happen.

    If it was ever a possibility, it ceased to be one after her infamous Skynet speech.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 2 You need to be logged in to vote
  22. s.russell (1,486 comments) says:

    David,
    There is a big distinction between a Maori MP representing a Maori electorate, a Maori MP representing a general electorate, and a Maorio list MP in respect of to whom they are primarily accountable.

    In the later two cases they are primarily accountable to non-Maori – indeed too great an emphasis on Maori concerns may be damaging. If a Maori MP in a general electorate had kicked up the kind of fuss over the foreshore and seabed legislation 10 years ago that some of the Maori electorate MPs did, they would have been committing political suicide. And a list MP would have been reined in by their party (varying on the party of course).

    But a Maori MP in a Maori electorate is in the opposite position – they not only could champion such an issue, but would be taking a huge risk not to – (and note how Labour Maori MPs who were weak on that mostly lost their seats to the Maori Party).

    Regardless of the rights and wrongs of that (and other similar) issues, and whether that is a good enough reason for retaining the Maori seats (maybe not), clearly Maori are getting something from those seven Maori seats that they do not get from Maori list MPs or Maori in general seats.

    [DPF: I agree with your reasoning. But by that reasoning we should have women only seats, so women can advocate on behalf of women, and gay only seats etc]

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  23. David Garrett (5,120 comments) says:

    You are obviously “here” DPF…perhaps you would like to comment on your urgings – or lack of same – to your friends in the Nats to put in place there policy from 2008 to abolish the Maori seats?

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  24. s.russell (1,486 comments) says:

    My suggestion five years ago (as a possible compromise between National and Maori party positions) was that the existence of the Maori seats be linked to the electoral option. Keep the seats as long as 50% of those eligible choose the Maori roll. If and when the proportion slips below that, abolish them. Note: That proportion fell from 58% at the 2006 option to 55% in 2013.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  25. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    [DPF: I agree with your reasoning. But by that reasoning we should have women only seats, so women can advocate on behalf of women, and gay only seats etc]

    You poll, DPF, do you know whether over 50% of women want women-only seats?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  26. Reid (15,531 comments) says:

    The silent assassin strikes again. IMO it’s a shame Key hasn’t yet exercised that skillset on McCully. He’s one of the nastier pieces of work on both sides of the house exemplified by the way he threw Allen to the wolves simply for doing what McCully has asked him to do.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  27. backster (2,000 comments) says:

    Well as Asians are about to overtake Maori (despite the crazy definition of who is a maori) as the number 2 ethnicity by numbers how well are they represented in the house and should they not be allocated special seats.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  28. AG (1,727 comments) says:

    Incidentially with Williams and Hayes both replacing non-Maori MPs, the number of MPs in Parliament of Maori descent is a record 25 out of 121…

    This is the second time you’ve claimed Poto Williams is “Maori” and included her in your statistics on Maori representation. The last time, I suggested she wasn’t, and you acknowledged that (see the thread to this post: http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2013/11/labours_gender_quotas.html#comments).

    So my question is, what is your basis for continuing to say she is tangata whenua?

    Here’s Labour’s press release upon her being selected:

    She is of Cook Island descent, part of a large extended family in New Zealand and Australia, holds an MBA from Southern Cross University and is currently writing a Doctoral Thesis on Pacific Women’s Leadership.

    Here’s how the Press described her:

    The Wellington-born, Auckland-raised Cook Islander has worked in social services for most of her working life and now sees an opportunity to press harder for them at a political level.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  29. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    Well as Asians are about to overtake Maori (despite the crazy definition of who is a maori) as the number 2 ethnicity by numbers how well are they represented in the house and should they not be allocated special seats.

    You’re aware that the same type of “crazy” definition applies to Pakeha and Chinese and Indian and *everyone other ethnicity*, right?

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  30. Alan (910 comments) says:

    Does it?

    My recollection of the census form specifically asked if I was a Maori or descended from one, I don’t recall any other racial group getting that treatment.

    If we count everyone in this fashion, the population must be ten million. My Indian / Euro / Maori neighbor must count as three people?

    I recall reading that a ranking system was in place that if you ticked Maori at all that’s the column you went under.

    In fairness all of the above may be a total nonsense, it’s just my recollection and I haven’t bothered to fact check it at all

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  31. peterwn (2,934 comments) says:

    RPM – It is usual for National (and probably other parties) to arrange for their MP’s to ‘cover’ all electorates, so a list MP would cover the electorate he or she failed to win, or an electorate MP would ‘cover a neighbouring electorate. To the extent funding allows, such MP’s may also set up ‘electorate’ offices.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  32. Graeme Edgeler (3,216 comments) says:

    Does it?

    My recollection of the census form specifically asked if I was a Maori or descended from one, I don’t recall any other racial group getting that treatment.

    You are confusing the descent question with the ethnicity question. Backster was discussing the ethnicity statistic. Everyone who ticks Maori is counted as Maori. But everyone who ticks Chinese is counted as Chinese, and everyone who ticks New Zealand European/Pakeha is counted as New Zealand European/Pakeha etc, no matter what else they pick.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.