Greens will push for cannabis decriminalisation

January 27th, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

The Green Party wants to see decriminalised, saying it will push for the law change in any post-election discussions but that it is not a bottom line.

Speaking after her State of the Nation speech at Waitangi Park in Wellington, co-leader Metiria Turei said they wanted to see the law changed.

“I would like to progress a vast amount of our policy, actually and that would be one that would be very interesting,” she said.

Turei said they believed a drug-free lifestyle was the healthiest, but did not believe adults should be convicted of a crime if they smoked cannabis.

I agree. There may be other ways to move from the status quo, such as the Law Commission’s recommended mandatory diversion scheme if people undertake drug counselling and treatment.

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98 Responses to “Greens will push for cannabis decriminalisation”

  1. Kimble (4,092 comments) says:

    Once it is decriminalised it cant be recriminalised for a long time.

    Given that, what will the people campaigning against it move on to?

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  2. igm (859 comments) says:

    Irresponsible, fiscally illiterate, useless bastards, should not even be in Parliament, let alone have the audacity to think they will be part of government.

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  3. xy (130 comments) says:

    But, you know, completely right about this.

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  4. rouppe (852 comments) says:

    DPF,

    My major concern with decriminalization is to make sure there is an evidential test available for drivers, similar to alcohol.

    Cannabis impairs driving ability. I don’t want to have to risk my son’s life being on the same road as stoners if there’s no way to roadside test them into court for driving under the influence.

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  5. OneTrack (1,960 comments) says:

    Do they mean decriminalise or legalise?

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  6. burt (7,085 comments) says:

    Random chemical cocktails in the form of ‘legal highs’ are freely consumable … A plant in use for thousands of years is not…. It’s a weird twisted world we live in where Nanny looks at the perception of a policy in terms of ‘how to get elected’ rather than ‘what is good for the country’.

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  7. jcuk (505 comments) says:

    A useful first step as Colorado followed was to make it legal for medcial reasons …. though without the racket of the American medical system where I gather one GP became a millionaire from issuing medical certificates to all and sundry who just has to say they were ;sick’ or something…. “that’ll be $100 please” In one door and out the other.

    It seems that so far Colorado users, now it is legal in that State, are being very responsible in its use. By the time it was possible to change the NZ law the Colorado situation will be much clearer.

    Slagging the Greens is not very intelligent.

    I have never smoked/used any illegal ‘substance’ and gave up smoking tobacco in 1974.

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  8. martinh (825 comments) says:

    I really dont want dope smokers at school. There should be hard labour imposed for anyone caught with it. Maybe they could start digging the puhoi motorway and save us paying all those corrupt roading companies big bickies

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  9. NK (916 comments) says:

    Harming yourself should not be a criminal offence. It’s that simple. If you disagree, then you’re saying attempted suicide should be a crime punishable by imprisonment.

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  10. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    At last a Green policy that will not cost more tax dollars and will save a fortune. :)

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  11. Yoza (1,348 comments) says:

    rouppe (805 comments) says:
    January 27th, 2014 at 4:14 pm

    My major concern with decriminalization is to make sure there is an evidential test available for drivers, similar to alcohol.

    You seem to be struggling under the misapprehension that people do not drive under the influence of pot because it is presently illegal.

    OneTrack (1,511 comments) says:
    January 27th, 2014 at 4:16 pm

    Do they mean decriminalise or legalise?

    They would mean decriminalise, I’m fairly sure the Greens are aware of the UN drug prohibition treaty to which New Zealand is a signatory.

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  12. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    If you disagree, then you’re saying attempted suicide should be a crime punishable by imprisonment.

    ]

    NK, I think it is.

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  13. Pete George (21,806 comments) says:

    Green policy on cannabis:

    Drug Law Reform – Policy Summary
    Key Principles

    The Green Party recognises that:
    - A drug-free lifestyle is the healthiest;
    - All drugs can cause harm, regardless of their legal status.
    - Not all drug use is problematic.
    - Some current government policies do not reduce harm but rather create a further set of problems.

    Goals
    - To reduce drug abuse;
    - To reduce the illegal drug market;
    - To minimise the harm of legal and illegal drugs on society and individual users.

    Specific Policy Points

    1. Immediate Steps
    -More funding for drug education programmes in schools and communities.
    - Establish a Ministerial Advisory Group on Drug Education to evaluate and improve drug education. (Greens initiated the drug education best practise guidelines published by the Ministry of Youth Development).
    - Prioritise the prosecution of crimes such as violent offences ahead of personal cannabis possession.
    - Enable doctors to prescribe cannabis products for severely ill patients.

    2. Medium Term Steps
    - Ban broadcast alcohol advertising and direct-to-consumer advertising of pharmaceuticals.
    - Introduce a legal age limit of 18 years for personal cannabis use.
    - Define in law the limits on growing cannabis for personal use.
    - Ensure it remains an offence to drive while under the influence of cannabis.

    - Support strong integration of, and better resourcing for, mental health and substance misuse services.
    - Place tighter controls on highly addictive prescription drugs.

    3. Longer Term Steps
    - Review all drug-related legislation to ensure consistency and a harm reduction approach.
    - Monitor and evaluate the effects of the removal of personal penalties for cannabis use, drug education programmes, drug addiction treatment programmes, and pharmaceutical controls.

    https://www.greens.org.nz/policy/summary/drugs

    Seems like a reasonable approach to me.

    I’ve never used cannabis but I think the law is not working well currently, and cannabis is no more harmful than alcohol.

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  14. RAS (55 comments) says:

    Decriminalizing cannabis is the worst of both worlds. The gangs still make their profits and all the social costs will still be borne by the taxpayer. Dope should be legalized, controlled and taxed in the same manner as alcohol.

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  15. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    Well, Uruguay has just comprehensively decriminalised and there seems to be little harm from the Netherlands example, where personal use of small amounts for recreational purposes are legal. In fact, the latter seems an exemplary orderly and stable society. In addition, I’m sure that the Greens would agree to prudent limitations like a strictly observed age limit and trying to keep it away from people with schizophrenia, although I’m not sure how the latter could be managed.

    I’m a progressive teetotaller on such matters. I’ve never inhaled, but I don’t begrudge adults who do. However, it should be in the privacy of one’s own home, preferably not in front of children or impressionable teenagers. Nor do I smoke, nor do I drink alcohol. Which doesn’t make me a wowser, incidentally, because I do believe in responsible drinking. Just not in my own case, by my own personal choice. Which may not be the case for others and I accept that.

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  16. Kimble (4,092 comments) says:

    You seem to be struggling under the misapprehension that people do not drive under the influence of pot because it is presently illegal.

    Yoze, you arent nearly as intelligent as you no doubt tell others you are.

    If it is decriminalised use will increase.

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  17. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Dope should be legalized, controlled and taxed in the same manner as alcohol.

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  18. big bruv (12,349 comments) says:

    More bullshit from the stinking Greens.

    This is about legalising Cannabis, they stinking Greens might call it decimalisation but we all know what that means.

    Once again the stinking Greens show their hypocrisy, the Greens want to ban all fatty food and control what our kids eat (hilarious given the size of their ever increasing female co leader) yet they want to tell those same kids that cannabis is perfectly fine.

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  19. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    And I certainly do not believe that it should be illegal in the context of medicinal purposes, where it has been shown in replicable medical and scientific studies to benefit those with severe or chronic illnesses. Nor do I believe any individual who can demonstrate such a legitimate need should be criminally penalised, which is one of the major injustices of the current prohibitionist legislation, the Misuse of Drugs Act 1981. I think the legislation in question should be scaled back and focus on ‘hard’ Class A drugs under the current definition, especially P/crystal meth, which seems to resist orthodox harm minimisation and risk reduction in this context.

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  20. kowtow (6,694 comments) says:

    rouppe

    Not just drivers.

    Dope smokers make very poor and unmotivated students,this is rich coming from the party who want to feed kids in school to learn but who through decriminalising weed will see a big increase in dope smoking among the young (IMHO)

    Unmotivated and unqualified students then become the unemployable of the future.

    Cost to the taxpayer? Yes. We just won’t see it immediately. But there’ll be a shit load more mental brain dead to look after down the road.

    Do the Greens still support a tobacco free Aotearoa?

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  21. Longknives (4,047 comments) says:

    So the same Greens who want to ban everything from the Sausage Sizzle to Coca Cola want our kids baked on Cannabis everyday? Fucking Pothead losers….

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  22. JMS (201 comments) says:

    @big bruv

    that’s the problem with the Greens, they are hypocrites, and nanny-staters when it suits them.

    Just as you are.

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  23. NK (916 comments) says:

    @Kea – unlawful for others to assist or encourage suicide, but not a crime for someone to try themselves. At least it wasn’t the last time I looked. At the rate we are protecting people from themselves in this country it has probably changed!

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  24. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Everyone who wants to smoke dope is already doing it. The law is just a hugely expensive and fultile exercise in imposing the will of a few on others at the tax payers expense. And it is a big expense !

    big bruv, you made a vaild point.

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  25. kowtow (6,694 comments) says:

    “Cannabis no more harmful than alcohol”

    oh do fuck off.

    One or 2 drinks with a meal, no problem driving.How about after a joint?

    Didn’t think so.

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  26. Nukuleka (77 comments) says:

    More hypocrisy from the Greens and fellow travelers such as DPF. There are enough social ills in our community without legalizing. decriminalizing and therefore ENCOURAGING yet more. As for saying that “a drug free lifestyle is the healthiest” and then supporting increased drug use … unbelievable claptrap.

    God indeed save New Zealand.

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  27. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    BB, you do realise that the Greens aren’t the only ones who support decriminalisation of pot, and there are libertarian/classical liberal individuals on the centre-right who would agree with the proposition in this context? And what’s wrong with regulating fatty or oversugared food- as opposed to banning it- and encouraging responsible corporates to provide healthy alternative fare? Preventative health programmes provide benefits to the public purse through clearing up what might become serious medical conditions later on and result in expenses like ameliorative pharmaceuticals, staff wages, hospital bed occupancy and medical equipment deterioration and replacement costs? What’s not for any thoughtful classical liberal to like?

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  28. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    And alcohol is legal, yet, thankfully, its total consumption is dropping. Take away the illicit mystique and decriminalise it and the same thing will probably happen to pot.

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  29. Peter (1,468 comments) says:

    The Greens are right about this. The resident nanny-staters, who pretend to embrace freedom, are showing their big-state tendencies.

    Get it done. Make it non-negotiable, Greens.

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  30. nickb (3,629 comments) says:

    It’s pretty ridiculous that its illegal currently…legalise it and tax it.

    Marijuana must have a fraction of the harmful social effects as alcohol, yet is treated as being much worse.

    It’s scandalous there is people sitting in our jails from possessing and growing it. It’s even more scandalous people are having their homes and other property confiscated because of it. It’s also less well known that income from the sale and dealing of illegal drugs is taxable in the same way as Mr Whippy Joe Public is taxed) even though it is from illegal activities.

    I find it amusing the government denounces these activities whilst taking a big cut. It resembles mafia style protection rackets

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  31. JMS (201 comments) says:

    @kowtow

    When alcohol is consumed in the way you describe (2 drinks with a meal), it is indeed less harmful or dangerous.

    But when either drug is abused, alcohol invariably has more negative effects on innocent third parties.

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  32. scrubone (2,971 comments) says:

    But when either drug is abused, alcohol invariably has more negative effects on innocent third parties.

    So you’re saying that, were you in an abusive relationship you’d rather be trying to get away from an alcoholic than a stoner?

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  33. big bruv (12,349 comments) says:

    JMS & Chardonnayguy.

    I actually don’t care if they decriminalise (which means legalise) every drug in the world. What I object to is people like you claiming to be libertarian types who will then want to fund the rehab of the fuckwits who decide they want to try drugs.

    Take what ever drugs you want, just don’t ask me to pay for the rehab or the health care of those who are brain damaged or injured while stoned.

    Until the Greens or the faux libertarians come out with a policy that says there will be NO tax payer funded rehab then I am more than keep to keep it illegal and to punish as many dope heads as possible.

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  34. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Where is Griff when you need him ? :)

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  35. jp_1983 (98 comments) says:

    With the Greens feeding the kids and Labour giving $60p/w looks like the parents will get some extra money to spend on weed.

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  36. rouppe (852 comments) says:

    Yoza

    I am under no such misapprehension. However presently if a driver is stopped and it becomes apparent (through smell or other means) that there is cannabis involved, they can be immediately arrested.

    If cannabis is legalised/decriminalised then unless a reliable test can be administered that will stand up in court, then many will be able to drive away from such a stop.

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  37. JMS (201 comments) says:

    @big bruv

    you’re confusing liberal with libertarian.

    As a more-or-less libertarian, I say let them make their own decisions and pay for their own mistakes.
    If they can’t afford to pay for their mistakes, tough. They made those choices.

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  38. gump (1,228 comments) says:

    @scrubone

    I have been in a relationship with an alcoholic and watched them go through the DTs before they committed suicide.

    Given the choice, I would avoid a relationship with an alcoholic at all costs.

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  39. Peter (1,468 comments) says:

    Take what ever drugs you want, just don’t ask me to pay for the rehab or the health care of those who are brain damaged or injured while stoned.

    I imagine it will be taxed like cigarettes.

    I’d also like a rebate on the tax I pay for sports people. A lot of them get injured, and I imagine quite a few are brain damaged to start with, especially when it comes to league.

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  40. davidp (3,319 comments) says:

    The Greens confuse me. On one hand, they want to ban GM food until it has been proven to be safe. But on the other hand, they want to legalise cannabis even though it is known to be harmful. Where has their precautionary principle gone?

    (I’m in favour of legalisation of cannabis. But then I’m also in favour of GM foods, old fashioned light bulbs, long hot showers, and fracking. I’d be embarrassed if my principles were as inconsistent as the Greens.)

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  41. Harriet (4,010 comments) says:

    Alcohol is a bad bad drug the greenies tell us……and now they suggest that people should legally mix pot with it!

    This will end well. :cool:

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  42. JMS (201 comments) says:

    @davidp

    The Greens, just like conservonutters, are hypocrites. Don’t expect any logical consistency from them.

    Your last sentence hits the nail on the head.

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  43. dime (8,752 comments) says:

    isnt this a form of SMOKING? :O :O :O

    the greens are full of shit. this is their annual heads up to all the one issue pot smoking losers out there. the greens want to keep their 1% of the vote.

    i actually dont care anymore. sell it at gas stations if ya want. its the hypocrisy of these green assholes

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  44. OneTrack (1,960 comments) says:

    Yoza – “Do they mean decriminalise or legalise?

    They would mean decriminalise, I’m fairly sure the Greens are aware of the UN drug prohibition treaty to which New Zealand is a signatory.”

    Thanks Yoza. But the first thing I find when googling for that treaty is:

    “The Convention requires parties to establish criminal offences for specified conduct contrary to its provisions.”

    …establish criminal offences… so it looks like the Greens are already intending to ignore the UN drug prohibition treaty? Or they weren’t aware of the treaty?

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  45. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    I have no problem with those who oppose cannabis use and consider it a bad idea. In fact I agree with them. What I have a problem with is those people imposing their view on others by force of law at huge expense to society and personal liberty. They are authoritarian stateists crying to nanny state to make others do as they want.

    I do agree that the Greens are hypocrites for wanting punitive taxes imposed on food, alcohol and other things they do not approve of, while wanting to go the other way with cannabis.

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  46. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    so it looks like the Greens are already intending to ignore the UN

    OneTrack, if they keep that up even I might vote for them !

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  47. gump (1,228 comments) says:

    @OneTrack

    “so it looks like the Greens are already intending to ignore the UN drug prohibition treaty? Or they weren’t aware of the treaty?”

    ————————–

    The UN Convention on Narcotic Drugs doesn’t require signatories to criminalize drug possession for personal use.

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  48. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    My major concern with decriminalization is to make sure there is an evidential test available for drivers, similar to alcohol.

    rouppe, as opposed to keeping it illegal and not testing ?

    And your son will at least try it, count on it.

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  49. David Garrett (5,120 comments) says:

    Cannabis is not the harmless drug we all thought it was as we enthusiastically inhaled in 30 or 40 years ago…that said, I want my police-tax dollars spent on policing real crime, not at $500 an hour using helicopters to lift a few hundred plants out of the bush…

    Can someone tell me the difference between decriminalising and legalising? In terms of impinging on dope smokers’ lifestyles there is no significant difference that I can see…I say lets watch the Colorado experiment for a year or so and see what happens…I suspect it will not turn out well..

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  50. kowtow (6,694 comments) says:

    Alcohol is not a drug,anymore than sugar or tobacco is.

    The increased use of the sentence “alcohol and other drugs” so beloved of the new left is double speak aimed at de normalising alcohol.

    The irony is the same people denormalising tobacco and alcohol seem to have no problem with their sacred herb.

    It is a tactic ,part of an agenda.

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  51. kowtow (6,694 comments) says:

    DG

    Every plant seized is an “asset” stripped from a criminal.

    As such it’s time and money well spent.

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  52. nasska (9,501 comments) says:

    About the only thing in the entire stinking commie mess that is the Green’s likely manifesto that I agree with…..totally.

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  53. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Alcohol is not a drug

    Author: Kowtow at Kiwiblog January 2014 :)

    Dear oh dear kowtow !

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  54. gump (1,228 comments) says:

    @kowtow

    “Alcohol is not a drug,anymore than sugar or tobacco is.”

    ————————-

    Have you ever seen a person with Delirium Tremens, Alcoholic Amnesia, or Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome?

    I’d politely suggest that these horrific conditions aren’t associated with the misuse of sugar.

    Alcohol is simply one of many drugs that are used in our society.

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  55. Harriet (4,010 comments) says:

    “…..that said, I want my police-tax dollars spent on policing real crime, not at $500 an hour using helicopters to lift a few hundred plants out of the bush…”

    And after the media talk up the fact that it is legal to smoke pot………

    People will steal it when everyone starts to grow it.

    Some will even still sell it but at far less value.

    Young people will start to mix pot with alcohol like they pour their own spirits now – to get smashed cheaply.

    Younger kids will smoke it.

    Drivers will smoke it. School teachers too. ‘…I’ll just have a cone before I leave for work…just one…it’s Friday anyway….’

    And the police will be paid to police all that.

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  56. JMS (201 comments) says:

    kowtow (6,187 comments) says:
    January 27th, 2014 at 5:38 pm

    Alcohol is not a drug,anymore than sugar or tobacco is.

    Two things are certain here:

    You never passed SC Science
    You’ve never even tried Cannabis

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  57. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Harriet, that is not how things happen in countries with liberal drug laws. Are you admitting that the only thing keeping you from being a pot head is the threat of the states sanctions, a bit like kowtow needing the government to control his craving for cock ?

    You seem to put no faith in individual responsibility. You pass that responsibility onto the state and remove individual choice. But look at your reaction when you do not agree with the state. How would you feel if they legalise all drugs and ban the practice of Christianity ? What could you say, given that you have now declared the state should have total control and individual choice should be invalidated ?

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  58. nasska (9,501 comments) says:

    People should be legally allowed to do what they wish with their bodies & should accept any adverse affects as their own responsibility including any crime they commit while under the influence of their chosen drug.

    That said, if recreational drugs are to remain illegal let’s include alcohol & tobacco. After all what is sauce for the goose should be sauce for the pontificating know alls who would tell us how to live our lives.

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  59. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    nasska, are you gay married yet now its legal ?

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  60. nasska (9,501 comments) says:

    Nah….the missus & I talked it over but we decided to remain unfashionably hetero. Mind you I remember some of God’s little helpers were under the impression that gay marriage was to be compulsory.

    I wonder how things turned out for them. :)

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  61. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    nasska, I find that hard to believe. Surely if something becomes legal we are compelled to do it en masse ?

    For example; It is perfectly legal for kowtow to get off his face on alcohol and ram a big black dildo up his arse. Therefore it follows that kowtow MUST do exactly that.

    There is simply no other possible outcome. Use the sense the God gave you man ;)

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  62. nasska (9,501 comments) says:

    I think it’s too late Kea…..when homosexuality was made legal a few years ago he got confused & threw away the big black dildo.

    Now he goes for the real thing. :)

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  63. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    nasska, I notice he keeps Red on a short leash and won’t even let him comment on KB anymore. It all happened shortly after they made sodomy and gay marriage compulsory. Well they claimed it was compulsory, but legal opinion differed around that. But who am I to question their deeply held convictions regarding what nanny state allows !

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  64. nasska (9,501 comments) says:

    When’s the anniversary? I must send flowers. :)

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  65. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    19 August 2013

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  66. Grendel (873 comments) says:

    its actually a good idea, but goes completely against their current jackbooted authoritarian approach to peoples personal choice when it comes to alcohol, tobacco, sugary drinks and other ‘unhealthy’ food.

    so weed gets a pass becuase they know they might get a few votes for it, but if you think your kid should be able to eat a pie at school, they think you are a bad person.

    the greens are fucking barmy.

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  67. adze (1,695 comments) says:

    @rouppe

    If cannabis is legalised/decriminalised then unless a reliable test can be administered that will stand up in court, then many will be able to drive away from such a stop.

    There is a test that Police carry out if they suspect drugs (often done at the station rather than at the roadside), and if the driver fails that, a blood sample is taken and sent to ESR, who test the sample for a number of drugs. The latter test is very reliable in court.

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  68. bc (1,251 comments) says:

    A very good discussion, with lots of interesting viewpoints.
    Then big bruv arrived @4.37, and longknives two minutes later.
    Talk about dumb and dumber.

    Did you two miss the point where the Green Party accepts drug use is harmful and misuse of drugs should be considered a health issue.
    And you also seemed to miss the bit where the Green Party policy is that drug use is illegal for people under 18.

    Of course you missed all that, because it is much easier to just make shit up.

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  69. big bruv (12,349 comments) says:

    bc

    Or…..it might just be that only a moron would believe anything the Greens have to say.

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  70. bc (1,251 comments) says:

    There is no reason to believe they would break their promises any more than any other politician, big bruv.

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  71. stephieboy (1,123 comments) says:

    Smoking cannabis is a victimless crime to use a turn of phrase.
    Sensible move by the Greens
    Appears to be working in Colorado.

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  72. big bruv (12,349 comments) says:

    bc

    Virtually nothing that the Greens say is honest. There is every reason to be of the opinion that they are the most duplicitous bastards in the house.

    Yes the Nat’s (and even Labour) might be economical with the truth from time to time but the Greens are in a whole league of their own when it comes to bare faced lies.

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  73. bc (1,251 comments) says:

    Evidence? (Facts)
    Or opinion?

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  74. Nostalgia-NZ (4,685 comments) says:

    Looks like the Greens have made themselves relevant to a reasonably sized part of the electorate, a step up from hugging trees and saving snails – back to the future.

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  75. eszett (2,264 comments) says:

    I do agree that the Greens are hypocrites for wanting punitive taxes imposed on food, alcohol and other things they do not approve of, while wanting to go the other way with cannabis.

    The current position is what truly is hypocritical. One form of drug, alcohol, is not only legal, it is glorified in society and media on a daily basis. On ther other hand similar form of drug, cannabis, is criminalised.

    The green policy is actually getting rid of the hypocrisy that currently exists.
    But all things that are okay in small dosis, but can be abused in large quantaties on the same footing and use resources to educate and minimalise the harm. (e.g. by taxing it)

    So, no actually the greens in this point are not hypocrites.

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  76. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    eszett, point accepted.

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  77. eszett (2,264 comments) says:

    kowtow (6,187 comments) says:
    January 27th, 2014 at 5:38 pm
    Alcohol is not a drug,anymore than sugar or tobacco is.

    Yeah, I guess that why we are seeing all those police stops, checking drivers for their sugar levels.

    Stop all those crazy drivers on a sugar rush, I say!

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  78. bhudson (4,720 comments) says:

    It takes a special sort of ‘logic’ to think that you will address problems with alcohol by making other substances legal…

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  79. Nostalgia-NZ (4,685 comments) says:

    Hopefully not the same sort of logic that has addressed problems with alcohol by making other substances illegal bhudson.

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  80. bhudson (4,720 comments) says:

    N-NZ,

    I agree completely – no one should declare other substances illegal in order to try to address alcohol problems

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  81. Dazzaman (1,114 comments) says:

    Crikey, the greens have to be the most expensive mistake ever!

    Get ready for more shit for brains, stoned trash begging & making nuisances of themselves on our streets……if any of the shitheads who regularly bother me in town are wearing a greens shirt, or something similar, I’ll knock them out on the spot.

    Welcome to New Zealand, where cows & fried brained trash are our only growth industries.

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  82. Nostalgia-NZ (4,685 comments) says:

    Interesting times bhudson, particularly when reflecting on the crap Don Brash got for raising it as a point of conversation prior to the last election. I think it will bring the Greens votes because it speaks of tolerance rather than restriction, a resonant language in modern times. They’ve been leaning far toward negative restrictions, forgetting in the process that society moves forward. No disasters have happened in the Coromandel, in fact it might be too heavily restricted with ‘green’ by laws, Greenpeace have turned into the Greenpolice looking for the next showdown at the ok corral, while millions have been spent on this ‘drug war’ that after 40 or 50 years has no end in sight, in fact substitutes alternatives are for sale in corner shops.

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  83. Grendel (873 comments) says:

    good point nostalgia, will the media turn on the greens now like they turned on brash? when brash talked about legalising marijuana he was vilified by the media and made to look like a kook, now of course i bet they crawl up the arse of the greens on how forward thinking and awesome this policy is.

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  84. Nostalgia-NZ (4,685 comments) says:

    I don’t care much Grendel about the media’s point of view, Brash was right on this and so are The Greens – good to see it go on the table.

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  85. hj (5,682 comments) says:

    Smoke dope become a wombat.
    V’s zig-zag down the pavement yelling, up ending wheely bins, smashing bottles?

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  86. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Get ready for more shit for brains, stoned trash begging & making nuisances of themselves on our streets……if any of the shitheads who regularly bother me in town are wearing a greens shirt, or something similar,if any of the shitheads who regularly bother me in town are wearing a greens shirt, or something similar, I’ll knock them out on the spot.

    Dazzaman will show the world that he is not a nuisance to society by randomly assaulting people in the street.

    I think he should have another drink and calm down !

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  87. nickb (3,629 comments) says:

    Lol ^^^^

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  88. Ryan Sproull (6,661 comments) says:

    oh do fuck off.

    One or 2 drinks with a meal, no problem driving.How about after a joint?
    Didn’t think so.

    For some people.

    For some people, seven or eight drinks watching TV, no problem smacking the wife around. How about after a joint? Didn’t think so.

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  89. Ryan Sproull (6,661 comments) says:

    so weed gets a pass becuase they know they might get a few votes for it, but if you think your kid should be able to eat a pie at school, they think you are a bad person.

    I hear they don’t want kids to be able to buy booze at school either. It’s almost as if the Greens think that adults and children should be treated differently.

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  90. ChardonnayGuy (1,023 comments) says:

    Oh dear. It seems Labour has caved in to the antidrug populists over this one. Perhaps a call for a conscience vote on the issue would be better served instead? Not all Labour MPs agree with Shane Jones (although I do agree with Jones that the Ratana Pa probably wasn’t an appropriate place for a tiresome ALCP rant about The Great Weed).

    This would seem to be one of those issues where leftoid ‘consensus conservatives’ line up with authoritarian conservative statists on the centre-right, facilitated by antidrug populism, against those who of us who prefer an evidence-based approach, nuance and practical emphasis to our drug policy. Interdiction and law enforcement do have their place in drug policy, but they need to be directed against harder drugs than Class C pot. Or other Class C drugs.

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  91. Grendel (873 comments) says:

    nice try ryan, in your douchebag hipster attempt to respond you of course had to ignore the fact that the greens are almost apoplectic with their authoritarian approach to alcohol and tobacco for ADULTS but very relaxed about cannabis.

    the fact that they think its ok for an 18yr old to smoke dope but buy a pie at school does not seem to bother you, but then you are just another green troll, who will forgive all their hypocrisy because they supposedly care for the environment.

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  92. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    ChardonnayGuy (907 comments) says:
    January 28th, 2014 at 10:34 am

    Not all Labour MPs agree with Shane Jones (although I do agree with Jones that the Ratana Pa probably wasn’t an appropriate place for a tiresome ALCP rant about The Great Weed).

    Good comment, but I believe that any gathering of Maori is an appropriate place to raise this issue. Shane Jones is correct to say that alcohol and cannabis are a problem in Maori communities. But that is no reason to be offended by a speech on legalizing cannabis.

    Convictions and imprisonment do not help alleviate the problem of drug abuse, they only limit the opportunities of people who are already likely to be from lower socio-economic groups. While Maori are only 15% of the population they account for approx 40% of the convictions for drug offending.

    http://www.justice.govt.nz/publications/publications-archived/2000/publication/documents/2_17.txt

    Age standardized usage rates (prior 12 months) for drugs only differ by about 30ish percent between Maori and Pakeha which is not nearly sufficient to account for the conviction rate being almost triple their share of the population.

    http://www.health.govt.nz/publication/2007-08-new-zealand-alcohol-and-drug-use-survey-online-data-tables

    This systemic inequity seems like a better reason to be offended in my view.

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  93. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    [ While Maori are only 15% of the population they account for approx 40% of the convictions for drug all offending.]

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  94. KevinH (1,128 comments) says:

    D.G. has a point, we should observe the Colorado experiment to determine the outcome of legalising the sale and use of cannabis. My personal view is that cannabis should be available for medicinal purposes particularly for those people whom are intolerant to codeine and morphine, and be prescribed in pill form to be ingested as opposed to being smoked.
    Many years back following an injury a friend brewed me a pot of mj tea which I found pleasantly relaxing and slightly euphoric and recently at a party I partook of a joint of skunk which I didn’t enjoy because the effects made me drowsy and disorientated.
    My main worry is that the young will abuse it and in turn create a generation of idle stoners.

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  95. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Kea (9,938 comments) says:
    January 28th, 2014 at 1:56 pm

    [ While Maori are only 15% of the population they account for approx 40% of the convictions for all offending.]

    Fortunately I’m not aware of anyone suggesting that violent or other types of offences be removed from statute. The inequity as per actual drug use still exists and, if anything, would only help worsen Maori representation in other crime stats. The pernicious effects of drug prohibition extend beyond the direct impacts on individuals. Gangs thrive on drug prohibition and consequently many other forms of crime are exacerbated and associated with black market drugs.

    Maori are aware of the problems that drugs and gangs cause in their community. Unfortunately many are not aware of how continuining prohibition does nothing to fix it.

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  96. Kea (10,451 comments) says:

    Weihana, yes but that is not my point. Maori are not being singled out for drug enforcement. Though perhaps they are for enforcement generally.

    I personally think we have too many petty laws all together.

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  97. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    KevinH (1,097 comments) says:
    January 28th, 2014 at 1:59 pm

    D.G. has a point, we should observe the Colorado experiment to determine the outcome of legalising the sale and use of cannabis.

    Problem is not everyone will employ the same method of evaluation. Even a small reported rise in usage will be jumped on as evidence of failure without regard for whether the usage rate has actually increased or whether, if it has, the harm associated with such usage is greater than the harm caused by prohibition itself. For instance, if an alcoholic switched to pot I’d probably list it as a positive outcome.

    The suggestion that we “observe the experiment” implies that there is a lack of evidence around the issue. But this pretense simply ignores the reality that the drug has been around for a long time, that it has been legal before, and that we can already observe the effects of illegal usage and it is safe to say that civilisation will not end because of legalization.

    My main worry is that the young will abuse it and in turn create a generation of idle stoners.

    I think that outcome is generally symptomatic of other underlying issues with their childhood.

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  98. Weihana (4,475 comments) says:

    Kea (9,939 comments) says:
    January 28th, 2014 at 2:18 pm

    Weihana, yes but that is not my point. Maori are not being singled out for drug enforcement.

    Well I’m not suggesting there is some sort of racist plot afoot. But the law, in its application, is unequal. And given the problems the Maori community has with gangs and criminality in general, I believe the pernicious effects of these drug laws are especially harmful to Maori.

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