How not to launch a party

January 16th, 2014 at 3:53 pm by David Farrar
  1. Don’t have Whale Oil release the strategy for you
  2. Don’t have people find out that those media types who have been saying such nice things about you, are on the payroll
  3. Don’t have as your proposed central strategy a policy to bribe an entire electorate by giving them free Internet
  4. Consider reading electoral law before you announce a party to launch your party, so you don’t have to cancel it at the last moment.

This has been the political equivalent of the launch of Wheedle!

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76 Responses to “How not to launch a party”

  1. RightNow (7,014 comments) says:

    Kim Dotcom @KimDotcom
    I’m really sad right now :-(

    Diddums

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  2. Monty (899 comments) says:

    This is not a political. It is only a short term cult movement never to be heard from again post late November 2014

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  3. burt (7,423 comments) says:

    Bollox DPF – At least he’s not like the major parties where he simply ignores the Electoral Commission advice then validates his actions retrospectively !

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  4. dime (10,207 comments) says:

    this has gone about as well as the launch of that trademe alternative!

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  5. NK (1,259 comments) says:

    How did it/can it breach electoral law? It’s not treating because the election hasn’t been called yet.

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  6. Manolo (14,161 comments) says:

    Has the mercenary, the pen-for-hire Bradbury shown his face today?

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  7. burt (7,423 comments) says:

    NK

    Interesting point… surely all he needs to do is say the rules were confusing and others were doing it too – then say ‘Move on’ ????

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  8. anonymouse (704 comments) says:

    @NK, treating under the electoral act is not restricted to when an election has been called, the language is simply “before, during, or after an election,”
    There is certainly scope for someone to claim that what happened was treating, and as an election must be held in 2014, it is certainly “before”

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  9. NK (1,259 comments) says:

    If an election launch is breaking the law then come about August-September this year a lot of people looking forward to election launches are going to be disappointed.

    I reckon there are other reasons for the cancellation that we aren’t being told.

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  10. NK (1,259 comments) says:

    @anonymouse – yes, I realise that. But the day after the last election is also “before” this election. That can’t possibly be the interpretation.

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  11. ex-golfer (169 comments) says:

    So what’s he going to do with the supposed 25,000 email addresses from party registrants then?
    Not hard to guess.
    Political spam coming to your inbox peeps.

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  12. queenstfarmer (782 comments) says:

    I guess this is what happens when you take political advice from master-strategist Martyn Bradbury :-)

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  13. anonymouse (704 comments) says:

    @NK, A judge may simply interpret it to mean “anytime” (which is why I suspect they called the thing off)

    -Now why parliament used the terms, “before, during and after” is anyone’s guess, But if you can find a politician from 1993 you could ask them….

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  14. Joanne (177 comments) says:

    The nutters come out in election year.

    This party should stick to the beer and chips The pre-launch has been a disaster because it is actually a launch by WhaleOil.

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  15. Pete Burdon (19 comments) says:

    I think they need to say publicly what everyone’s role is. Without confirming it and being available to media, they are leaving journalists and commentators to speculate. For example, there is probably some good reason why Alastair Thompson didn’t initially leave scoop. But if he doesn’t tell us, (and his tweet doesn’t give all the answers) everyone will think he has something to hide and believe the commentators.

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  16. SPC (5,664 comments) says:

    So no party for the Internet Party.

    Maybe they can hold it on-line and eat their own food and drink their own drink.

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  17. Daniel (220 comments) says:

    I’m shocked that even with political mastermind Martyn Bradbury and political editor Alastair Thompson that such basic mistakes were made. It almost makes it look like Bradbury and Thompson and incompetent hacks who don’t have the first clue what they’re doing, but I’m sure that’s not the case…

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  18. NK (1,259 comments) says:

    Now why parliament used the terms, “before, during and after” is anyone’s guess, But if you can find a politician from 1993 you could ask them….

    So the interpretation has to be at “any time” because before, during and after can only mean that.

    Why can’t legislators write “at any time”, rather than be so obtuse?

    Anyway, he can still treat provided he isn’t doing it “corruptly”.

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  19. big bruv (14,211 comments) says:

    So for 8K a month you get a ‘political advisor’ who does not know the electoral rules.

    You could not make this shit up.

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  20. burt (7,423 comments) says:

    big bruv

    No politicians have ever needed to know the rules – they just say they were confusing and others were breaking them too …
    (ACT Party members are excluded from the divine right to be self serving – they stand trial rather than use parliament to validate their actions)

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  21. davidp (3,585 comments) says:

    >This has been the political equivalent of the launch of Wheedle!

    This has been the worst organised event since Hitler decided to invade the Soviet Union.

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  22. Nookin (3,556 comments) says:

    Party’s over, fellers.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/9616254/Dotcom-cans-Vector-party

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  23. NK (1,259 comments) says:

    It’s actually quite hilarious the more you think about it.

    Here’s this big internet entrepreneur worth squillions taking on the US Government and he isn’t prepared to hold a party launching a political party (not an election party, but a party launching the party) and take on our Electoral Commission.

    If he was willing to put his money where his mouth was he would just do it and challenge them to prove it was done “corruptly”. And if any supporters get caught up in the mess, because they can be charged too, he would simply challenge the EC to prosecute all 10,000 or so he alleges are coming to the party.

    In fact, his party isn’t even registered and there are no candidates so how can he possibly be breaking the treating law?

    If he was a big, tough guy that’s what he’d do. But he’s not doing that.

    Some big tough guy he is.

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  24. BeaB (2,164 comments) says:

    And how much cheaper for Dotcom than invading us – just hand out the bribes and gain control of a compliant media who jump to order.
    And are lining up to lick his boots.

    Thank goodness for Whaleoil and Kiwiblog.

    This ghastly man, with his criminal past and dubious ethics, will find plenty of halfwits who think it is some sort of protest vote while he makes hay with their data.

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  25. Nostalgia-NZ (5,317 comments) says:

    Since when could Vector Arena hold 25,000? There’s a message in that number however, and it may not be one to quickly gloat over.

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  26. burt (7,423 comments) says:

    NK

    If he was a big, tough guy that’s what he’d do. But he’s not doing that.

    Some big tough guy he is.

    Was Clark tough for flipping the bird at the Chief Electoral Officer ignoring the warning that the pledge card would be deemed electioneering ? Or was she only tough when she used parliament to kill the court case against her for doing that ?

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  27. stephen2d (98 comments) says:

    Martin Bradbury, the political strategist

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  28. RightNow (7,014 comments) says:

    “Since when could Vector Arena hold 25,000? There’s a message in that number however, and it may not be one to quickly gloat over.”

    25,000 people who want to go to a free party? You’re right, not a number to quickly gloat over, best to savour at length. If they were the type to be compos mentis on voting day they’d be voting Labour/Green

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  29. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    This obese goon is not even a citizen, he has been allowed residency status only, by Labour, when in power. He should be shown the door right now, for even contemplating feting losers to flout our electoral system.

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  30. Elaycee (4,425 comments) says:

    How not to launch a party

    1. Have as it’s figurehead a narcissistic, overhyped, fraudster / embezzler / insider trader / temporary resident.
    2. Hire a recognised leftard and a career fruitloop, as a ‘Political Advisor’….
    3. Think the combination of convicted criminal and low rent leaftard will somehow gain electoral support.
    4. Have your ‘Policy’ released earlier than intended – courtesy of Whale Oil.
    5. Announce the ‘launch’ to media outlets – both local and overseas. Then cancel.

    Comedy gold.

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  31. Nostalgia-NZ (5,317 comments) says:

    Somehow I don’t think they are of voting age RightNow.

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  32. Keeping Stock (9,371 comments) says:

    Suddenly, and in one fell swoop Martyn Bradbury has managed to make Colin Craig look normal and mainstream. Whether or not that was his intention is another matter altogether :D

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  33. Reboot (103 comments) says:

    RightNow (6,008 comments) says:
    January 16th, 2014 at 5:00 pm

    25,000 people who want to go to a free party? You’re right, not a number to quickly gloat over, best to savour at length. If they were the type to be compos mentis on voting day they’d be voting Labour/Green

    What Kiwibloggers fail to realise is that they do not represent the majority of the electorate and that how a significant portion of society view Kim Dotcom is very different from the fringe views of raging pro-smacking Left-hating religious fanatic commentors you see here daily.

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  34. adamsmith1922 (724 comments) says:

    What Dotcom has done is make the news and drive much of the political newscycle, thus materially improve his name recognition. His cancelling the party may well be seen by many as an attck on him by the old fogies and a spoling move by his opponents.

    I suspect that he may not be entirely unhappy with the situation at present. In one sense he has done us all a favour by exposing just how elements of the media are easily gulled by flamboyant, larger than life individuals

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  35. DJP6-25 (1,389 comments) says:

    So those of us on the right have either had a late Christmas present, or an early birthday present. What’s not to like?

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  36. NK (1,259 comments) says:

    OK- just checked, anyone can be charged with treating regardless of whether it’s a candidate or on behalf of a party etc. So the registration issue is a red herring.

    Still, he’s still a scaredy cat for failing to take on the EC, but is willing to take on the US Government.

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  37. Reid (16,681 comments) says:

    If he was willing to put his money where his mouth was he would just do it and challenge them to prove it was done “corruptly”.

    I’m not an immigration lawyer but I wonder if holding it under the circumstances could affect his residency, meaning he could then be extradited. That could explain why he cancelled given he’d tweeted partly the party was to launch the party, notwithstanding he recanted that.

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  38. nasska (12,088 comments) says:

    Already, the NZ political system owes much to Dotcom.

    Somehow his particular brand of insanity adds balance to that of Colin Craig.

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  39. Reid (16,681 comments) says:

    He’s an interesting personality. This party was supposed to also celebrate his 40th birthday, as well as his record and the IP. Whatever you think of him, not many of us have done even a fraction of what he’s done by the time we reach that age.

    I don’t mind him, myself, just like I don’t mind Craig. Personally, I think he’s at the end of a vendetta. I’ve read the FBI’s affidavit and yes he has a case to answer – notwithstanding questions over how they gathered their evidence. Emails etc. Justified by the racketeering charges. Which is the specific reason why they laid them.

    But does anyone imagine he’ll get a fair hearing in the US? With all those political appointees involved in the judicial process? And with Hollyweird pulling out all the propaganda stops including through their mates in the MSM not to mention Congress? You may as well send him to Zimbabwe and offer Mugabe $10,000,000 to “make an example.” The same “justice” will be applied in the US as he’d there.

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  40. nasska (12,088 comments) says:

    Reid

    With the partisan justice Dotcom will face should he be extradited to America he must be borderline eligible for refugee status.

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  41. davidp (3,585 comments) says:

    Reboot>What Kiwibloggers fail to realise is that they do not represent the majority of the electorate and that how a significant portion of society view Kim Dotcom is very different from the fringe views of raging pro-smacking Left-hating religious fanatic commentors you see here daily.

    According to Dotcom’s paid adviser Martyn Bradbury, the party will appeal to “urban professional male Gen X National Party voters who don’t derive an income from the Dairy Industry”. That description happens to fit me exactly. It also describes all of my colleagues at work, except that a few of them are female. We’ve discussed Dotcom and the consensus was that he is a worthless fat fraudster, and we’re completely confused why the media think that he has any credibility on any issue. He is a joke who brings the IT industry in to disrepute.

    It looks like Bradbury’s identification of me as someone who might support Dotcom’s narcissistic self-promotion is the sort of advice that you get for the price of a new Apple computer.

    Now what I want to know is where Graeme Edgeler fits in to all of this. I’ve always found Graeme to be one of the most sober and interesting commenters here. Now I’m wondering if he is also an incompetent mercenary crack-pot like Bradbury or Thompson. Graeme… how about putting in an appearance and explaining yourself?

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  42. SPC (5,664 comments) says:

    nasska, the ultimate revenge on a government sanctioning the illegal activity on behalf of the Americans would be its successor granting him refugee status (it won’t happen).

    But the Americans may well demand extradition if Labour win, it would look too embarrassing to the current government to do this so pressure would be placed on Labour to do it at a later time. Remember when 2 French agents were moved to another prison location etc because of French economic pressure.

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  43. alwyn (438 comments) says:

    I think the reason for having to cancel the party is much more mundane.
    He had got in all the supplies ready to go. Unfortunately yesterday evening he felt like a little late evening snack and scoffed the lot.
    Because he’s on a budget of about $30,000/month he can’t afford to restock.
    You don’t think he could eat that much? Just look at the size of him. You don’t get that way by stinting your appetite.

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  44. Yoza (1,926 comments) says:

    NK (773 comments) says:
    January 16th, 2014 at 4:10 pm

    If an election launch is breaking the law then come about August-September this year a lot of people looking forward to election launches are going to be disappointed.

    I reckon there are other reasons for the cancellation that we aren’t being told.

    Yes. It looks like the Electoral Commission closed down a political rally after coming under pressure from other major political parties; parties who may have been freaked out at the thought of 25000 people registering to attend a party launch.

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  45. nasska (12,088 comments) says:

    SPC

    As he already holds dual citizenship of two First World countries refugee status isn’t an option. In any case settling refugees is just another underhand method used by the social engineers of the UN to create their new “melting pot” of global citizens & stir up peaceful homogeneous societies.

    Fact remains that if extradition is successful he is doomed. Corporate USA is not a champion of justice….just revenge.

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  46. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    Why can’t he bribe an electorate.?

    Gold Cards anyone?

    Tax the fuck out of the “rick pricks ” anyone.

    ad nauseam

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  47. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    My 17 yr old gets to vote this year, guess who he’s voting for?
    Better than green I suppose, better than Winston I suppose, better than Labour I suppose

    Well done son, I’m proud.

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  48. BlairM (2,340 comments) says:

    Well this is all a bit sad. You want them to suck, but not so badly that nobody wastes their vote on them. If they were semi-competent, it could have been a boon to the Right, but they’re hopeless. Sigh.

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  49. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    I sense a bit of fear around because of the German. This party if it launches will grab the teenagers.
    There will be fear like when Helen saw Tamaki marching his church something the politicians can’t control

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  50. OneTrack (3,347 comments) says:

    nk – “Still, he’s still a scaredy cat for failing to take on the EC, but is willing to take on the US Government.”

    Uh, yeah. Hiding out in New Zealand is really showing he is willing to take on the US.

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  51. Viking2 (11,665 comments) says:

    PEB. you can smell the fear eminating from the pseudo righties. It comes on the ether.

    Its amazing the blinkered view so many have. Completely out of touch with younger people.

    But then I guess when you belong to a cult like National, Labour or NZ First your mind is really quite small and your worldview pretty small.

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  52. awryly (14 comments) says:

    There’s a good chance Dotcom’s “Internet Party” will get the 5% of the national vote he would need to get into Parliament. He is a very popular figure here likely to attract (a) many young voters whose only issue is the availability of free media, (b) others who have problems with the way the current right-wing government and its spy agencies behave – largely to oblige the Americans, (c) a general dislike in this country of the USA and its foreign policies, and (d) people who admire his charisma.

    He will energise people who have not voted before and people dissatisfied with the established parties. The National Government has associated itself with a zany religious conservative party in the hopes it will also get 5%, combine with National, and help keep it in government.

    Dotcom is a huge spoke in those wheels. And in the wheels of the US Department of Justice, which is trying to extradite him on charges that are here highly unpopular.

    Of course, if he becomes a political figure, the US DoJ will find the going even harder than it has been so far.

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  53. Pauleastbay (5,035 comments) says:

    V2

    Whats scary is my son gets a vote!!! He’s a computer kid and there are shit loads like him and they talk and talk and they are like most of us only know a small % of whats what but they are behind the german, whether theres enough of them to make a difference I don’t know but these are a new generation of voters that the traditional parties will not be getting

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  54. awryly (14 comments) says:

    The US government and corporates have a lot to fear from Dotcom’s Internet Party. Simply because it represents one of the few political parties that represent freedom from corporate control. The Pirate Party that originated in Sweden and now spans the world is not dissimilar but focuses on different issues. It has members in the European Parliament.

    The advantage the Internet Party has is that it has a very sizeable potential constitutency in New Zealand and overseas. Tens of thousands young people whose passions are not raised sufficiently to vote on other issues will see internet freedom as their political raison d’etre and gravitate to the Internet Party.

    If the Internet Party is successful in NZ, it is likely to spread to other countries with so far similarly self-disenfranchised youth. That will mean a heap of trouble for corporates in proportionally elected assemblies in other countries (like Australia).

    Dotcom is a huge spoke in those wheels. And in the wheels of the US Department of Justice, which is trying to extradite him on charges that are here highly unpopular.

    Of course, if he becomes a political figure, the US DoJ will find the going even harder than it has been so far.

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  55. awryly (14 comments) says:

    @V2.

    You’ve got it. Something your son will care about. Internet freedom. He won’t realise internet freedom also represents many other freedoms we have lost to big corporations.

    But that doesn’t matter. He will, by voting (probably for the first time), be taking a step he doesn’t know will grow in other areas. Tens of thousands like him will be doing the same.

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  56. radvad (734 comments) says:

    “The future of NZ is more important than one night of fun” says the megacrim.

    He has been in the country for five minutes and apparently the future of our country depends on him (or is that Him?) No wonder he is so big, he has a big head to carry.

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  57. Tauhei Notts (1,687 comments) says:

    Pauleastbay;
    Best comment on this site.
    Trouble is, your comment makes me worry for the future of our country.

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  58. radvad (734 comments) says:

    Methinks the Greens are the party with the most to fear.

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  59. Viking2 (11,665 comments) says:

    PEB: not a new worry. #adults, 1 right, 2 Green. Where did I go wrong. Ah the education system.
    Grandkids got a better understanding.

    Still its a lack of quality, unchanged history education I suspect.

    All very interesting when you look at DPF’s post about Lorde.
    She is totally typical.

    Oldies treat her like my oldies treated Elvis. Listen to Elvis these days and he was so mild.Ha.

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  60. Johnboy (17,015 comments) says:

    Never get into bed with the fat, ugly Germans party.

    All that Sour Kraut!

    He would make a Dutch oven seem like “Simply Spring”! :)

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  61. Nostalgia-NZ (5,317 comments) says:

    You’ve got it right PEB. I was trying to make the same point in a watered down way so as not to upset the punters. It’s highly interesting and not frightening because the young are the way of the future and don’t necessarily have political positions embedded from the past. It’s older people who get worried about change, while the younger, at least for the most, are interested in expanding their knowledge and thinking for themselves. Good on them I say, the future is theirs.

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  62. boredboy (250 comments) says:

    I think this move is going to backfire on him.

    Kim Dotcom has been enjoying the sorts of popularity he has because nobody has bothered to explain to people, in terms they can understand, what exactly he did wrong.

    Nobody has bothered to explain, in simple terms, why exactly he chose New Zealand.

    Nobody has explained, in simple terms, what his background is.

    We can probably blame the media for that a bit, but there was never really the impetus.

    However, there are now going to be moneyed and powerful groups (in New Zealand) whose interests lie in him not receiving formal electoral support. How is this achieved? By explaining to everybody in the country, in terms they can understand, who exactly this man is and why he is in New Zealand.

    He will come off worse for wear because, hitherto, there were no interest groups of any significance that needed him to be ‘outed’ fully.

    It would also be interesting to see the demographics of this group of 25,000. I suspect the vast majority of them live with their parents and are still attending secondary school.

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  63. boredboy (250 comments) says:

    Oh, and Martin Bradbury. Wow. Just, wow. He is pure comedy gold, and this is coming from a leftie.

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  64. bhudson (4,741 comments) says:

    Yes. It looks like the Electoral Commission closed down a political rally after coming under pressure from other major political parties; parties who may have been freaked out at the thought of 25000 people registering to attend a party launch.

    @Yoza , @NK,

    I think you might find that a big difference here is that party campaign launches are members events, whereas Dotcom was giving out a free lunch (party) and could perhaps be seen to be treating in return for support/votes.

    I don’t think the commentary and cancellation will affect other Parties and their campaign launches at all.

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  65. Peter (1,694 comments) says:

    Who would have thought Bradbury would turn out to be NZs funniest comedian.

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  66. bhudson (4,741 comments) says:

    I see Whaleoil has outed Bomber as saying in 2011 that he would never stand as an MP – that he didn’t see it as a means to achieve his objectives and that he wouldn’t want to be one.

    And yet all he asked Dotcom for was a PC and a small amount of financial resources.

    It says a great deal about his integrity that he would sell out his principles so cheaply.

    I guess at least it can be said that it was for a great deal more than ’30 pieces of silver’

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  67. awryly (14 comments) says:

    @bhudson

    The fact (if it is a fact) that Bradbury asked for so little to help promote the Internet Party suggests he is following his principles, not selling them out.

    Young single issue voters will probably flock to this party in droves. And it looks as though, when they do, they will encounter leftist policies NZ badly needs.

    Should be quite an education for them.

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  68. awryly (14 comments) says:

    @Nostalgia

    Don’t under-estimate other age groups. I am 73 and am sorely tempted to vote for the Internet Party. Assuming its other policies are palatable. I imagine, with Bradbury at the helm, they will fit my view of how a society should be run.

    The Internet Party is not just about internet freedom. It is also a powerful symbol of resistance to the monetarisation and corporatisation of our society which reduce our freedoms in all sorts of areas. Take the TPPA, for example.

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  69. awryly (14 comments) says:

    @davidp

    You and your mates are already well-captured by the corporate treadmill.

    The Internet Party is not primarily designed to change those who are already institutionalised. There are tens of thousands others, many of whom will vote for the first time, many of whom have been politically comatosed, who will vote on the powerful issue of internet freedom. They won’t care about asset sales, housing policies, tax reform favouring the wealthy, illegal GSCB spying, dodgy deals with casino operators and various corporations.. They won’t recognise that internet freedom could be a prelude to clawing back other freedoms from international corporations and the US government. But that won’t matter. This one issue that will energise them as no other could.

    I expect the Internet Party to get at least 3 seats in Parliament in 2014. But it probably won’t last much beyond that. Other parties will purloin its policies and it will become irrelevant by 2017. But in the meantime it will change the way Kiwis, especially young Kiwis, view the world.

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  70. awryly (14 comments) says:

    @boredboy

    It doesn’t matter who he is. It matters what he stands for.

    So he has a distant criminal past. So he has money. So what? He will not be in Parliament. He’s not an NZ citizen.

    The calibre of his party will be measured by the calibre of the candidates who stand. And the integrity of his policies.

    Fortunately, thanks to his money, they will be well resourced. Do you think Key is not?

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  71. awryly (14 comments) says:

    LOL. Someone doesn’t like me.

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  72. awryly (14 comments) says:

    For all you right-wingers who hope that the Internet Party will take votes off Labour and the Greens, think again.

    It may take some. But its main constituency is the people you fervently hoped would never vote for anything. The young, alienated and disaffected have finally been offered another choice.

    They may take it.

    Expect fireworks.

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  73. awryly (14 comments) says:

    I see I am in the lions’ den.

    And I’m not even a Christian.

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  74. awryly (14 comments) says:

    Arguments welcomed. If there are any that make any sort of sense.

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  75. boredboy (250 comments) says:

    Not too distant past? His last convictions were for securities fraud and were made two months after he arrived in New Zealand.

    See what I mean? Nobody knows.

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  76. lolitasbrother (774 comments) says:

    Martyn Bradbury is insane. Any party launch with him is fundamentally absurd.
    Its just a transfer of money from a criminal German to the manic mad street preacher, lose here.

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