The ever dropping road toll

January 1st, 2014 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

The 2013 is 254 dead, an 18% drop on 2012. This is the 2nd largest percentage drop since 1974. The largest was in 2011 when it dropped 24%.

roadtoll

As you can see the road toll is at a 60 year low. It peaked in 1973 at 843 and then dropped to 554 in 1979. After that it increased again to 795 in 1987. Since then it has generally been declining.

roadtollrate

 

When you measure it per 10,000 vehicles, the trend is stark.

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49 Responses to “The ever dropping road toll”

  1. Camryn (549 comments) says:

    I suppose the drop in the 1970′s can be partly attributed to the oil crisis, possibly hiding the “real peak”.

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  2. SGA (516 comments) says:

    Camryn at 7:05 am

    I suppose the drop in the 1970′s can be partly attributed to the oil crisis, possibly hiding the “real peak”.

    Maybe, but perhaps more likely to be the introduction of laws regarding seatbelts and motorcycle helmets at various stages throughout the 1970s.

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  3. Steve Wrathall (207 comments) says:

    Plus the now social unacceptability of drink driving, and the declining overall rate of alcohol consumption-despite what the MSM dribbles about “our” binge drinking culture.

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  4. duggledog (1,107 comments) says:

    When was the Auckland Harbour Bridge built because before they put up the concrete median barriers there was roughly one fatality every few days on there! Or it might have been one a day, can’t remember but it was terrible

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  5. fredinthegrass (268 comments) says:

    Happy New Year, DPF.
    Those are staggering figures and worthy of a wide publication.
    Looking forward to some great ‘blogging’ in 2014.

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  6. flipper (3,269 comments) says:

    The drop in road deaths is due to a multitude of interconnecting factors. It is certainly not due to political or Police action.

    Several keen observers with real, disinterested knowledge of transport matters, have said that there is a need to return traffic matters to a dedicated Ministry of Transport that operates with the integrity of that once run by Ray Polaschek and Barney Campbell. Peter Gordon as the then Minister determined policy based on their recommendations; Polaschek and Campbell administered the policy- without manipulating statistics.

    Polaschek and Campbell never bought into the road toll nonsense, arguing, correctly, that while the toll is a tragedy for victims, families and friends, the numbers killed are sadly, simply a matter of chance.

    For any given number of accidents, be they car v car, car v truck, car v bank or cliff, car v cyclist, or car v pedestrian, the number killed is determined by chance. One death may occur in a particular type of accident. But three or more may result from an identical accident. Ergo, the number statistic per se is invalid.

    Year by year comparisons are also invalid unless adjusted for population growth (currently 4,550,000 and growing by 1 every 7 minutes 42 seconds), roading improvements/deterioration, vehicle build safety devices, and vehicle density (now only 114,000 families of 1,454,000 do not have access to a PERSONAL motor vehicle). The graph giving a per 10,000 trend comes close.

    It is long past the time when news reports should be led by anything but the most unusual of accidents. But holidays are slow news days, and the silly children assigned by radio, TV and newspapers simply distribute self interested Police propaganda. Its all crap. But worst of all, the Police know it is crap…. and they know that a very large slice of the budget is driven by their budget for the “road toll”.

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  7. tvb (3,938 comments) says:

    The road toll has been steadily declining since the police took over.

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  8. ManuT (33 comments) says:

    I firmly believe the reduction in road deaths has a lot to do with the improvement of many roads over the past five years.
    Well done transport ministry for their part.

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  9. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    ……..nothing to do with the much vaunted 5 kph allowance then……

    …….and where are the stats for serious injury crashes?

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  10. Odakyu-sen (248 comments) says:

    Better road design has helped. One example is the conversion of “collision crossroads” on the road to Waiuku from Drury into a large roundabout. (The original road was okay if you didn’t fly through the intersection without looking for oncoming cars (but people being people meant that someone got killed there every once in a while)).

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  11. duggledog (1,107 comments) says:

    Could be dropped much further much quicker if we introduced compulsory third party. Teenagers in cars with 400 bhp is never going to end well. Happy for my premiums to go up by the way. In conjunction with much stiffer penalties for drunk driving and repeat offenders

    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. This country is a nation of motor heads, everyone bleats about the road toll which is still ridiculously high but just quietly we like to open ‘er up and see what she’s got on a quiet road

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  12. Michael (880 comments) says:

    This is a global trend in developed countries. Australia should drop below 1000 deaths per annum in the next few years, about the same time that NZ should be below 200.

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  13. PaulP (126 comments) says:

    I used to drive pretty quickly on the roads @duggledog but drive like a Nana now and get my fix now with the Playday on Track and Trackday Xperience days at tracks around the place.

    Really safe and well organised. Makes a big difference having all the cars going in the same direction!

    $105 on a nice safe track with cars nicely spaced out and go as fast as I like. Be great if we could get the boy racers to do this sort of thing there rather than on the street. Makes exceeding the speed limit on the road really boring and not necessary at all to get your speed fix. And, you can drive your home afterwards.

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  14. campit (438 comments) says:

    It’s a great result, but needs to be measured against vehicle kilometres travelled, which has been declining or flat in the last few years, rather than the number of vehicles.

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  15. redqueen (342 comments) says:

    Well said, Flipper. The Police know this is nonsense and use it for political reasons, while the media are just to lazy to do any real work (much easier to just parrot press releases). By comparison, the complexity of factors involved in road casualties is simply too much for the media or most politicians to understand, but amazingly better roads, safer cars, and smarter drinking attitudes are all pitching in to reduce accidents. Oh no, wait, it must be a 4km tolerance…

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  16. Lucia Maria (1,988 comments) says:

    We’ve had a number of crashes up on the Kapiti Coast that are either head-ons because of the lack of barriers, and/or at the end of merge lanes, such as the most recent one where a family went into the barrier and rolled, killing a baby gir, and one a year or so ago just south of Waikanae where a man lost control after finishing a passing maneuver, after which both passing lanes south of Waikanae were closed and barriers put in. So much of it up here is road design, and as roads are improved, the fatal crashes go down. Think of Centennial Highway and the number of head-ons we had there as well until the barriers went in.

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  17. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    Well done to the car manufacturers, NZ drivers, and the road designers.

    Time to ease off the revenue gathering and increase the speed limit to 110 on state highways and 130 on motorways.

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  18. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    Well the lower margin tolerance has affected my driving. I used to habitually drive between 50 and 60 kph in 50 k areas, now I drive around 50.

    It ain’t rocket science – Lower speed = fewer accidents.

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  19. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    drive at 10 kph then scott

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  20. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    drive at 10 kph then scott

    Reductio ad absurdum. The refuge of fools.

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  21. Paul Marsden (935 comments) says:

    A huge portion in the reduction of road deaths have been primarily through a) the installation of motorway medium barriers b) safety features in motor vehicles c) lower alcohol limits for driving.

    I was in the fire department during the 1970′s when fatalities were at their peak and where slaughter on Auckland’s Motorways / Mercer area, was almost a daily occurrence. For example, on one wet Friday night circa 1977, I extricated x 3 deceased from x 3 different accidents in around 3 hours on North Western motorway/Harbour bridge/Southern motorway, at a time when there were no medium barriers. For a time, I had a special interest in the extraction techniques of persons trapped in motor vehicles. The consensus in those days was that if everyone drove a Mercedes Benz, road deaths would be reduced dramatically. The speed card played by the Police is a red herring for a number of reasons, and of course, if one is driving faster and crashes, the chances of injury are greater (duh). All of us know that when we step onto an airplane and that should it crash, our chances of survival are very limited. It is the price and risk we take for living in today’s highly mobile world. If we don’t want deaths on our roads (or in our skies), then lets go back to the horse and cart, and ban aircraft too.

    The Police do a great job but this obsession with speed, does them no favours

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  22. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    Scott Chris (5,403 comments) says:
    January 1st, 2014 at 9:47 am

    It ain’t rocket science – Lower speed = fewer accidents.

    Reductio ad stupid

    if you think that’s all there is to it then you are waaay behind the 8 ball.

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  23. WineOh (428 comments) says:

    Good to see that they also recognise the increased safety profile of cars in both reducing the incidence of accidents and improving the survivability of crashes. Frontal impact standards, seatbelts, airbags, anti-lock brakes, traction control & stability control, ABS, etc.

    I’d be interested to see the trend line per 100,000km travelled compared to the per-10,000 vehicle rate.

    “The Road Toll Must Come Down” … is that mantra going to change any time soon?? I’m tired of seeing that on every speed camera ticket.

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  24. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    if you think that’s all there is to it then you are waaay behind the 8 ball.

    Of course I don’t idiot. It’s simply the most important factor given the relatively fixed nature of other variables. Takes years to improve vehicle and road safety. Takes a few seconds to still your inner child and slow down a bit.

    Difficult I realise when the inner child runs the show.

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  25. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    In 1973 the open road speed limit was lowered to 80kph. Now have a look at the graph and see if you notice anything. Then let your inner child take over and attribute the drop to the oil shock.

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  26. Odakyu-sen (248 comments) says:

    The police should give out tickets for dangerous driving for the conditions. This would force the police to seek out danger rather than seek out revenue.

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  27. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    Scott Chris (5,404 comments) says:
    January 1st, 2014 at 10:30 am
    if you think that’s all there is to it then you are waaay behind the 8 ball.

    Of course I don’t idiot. It’s simply the most important factor given the relatively fixed nature of other variables.

    Wtf?

    Fixed nature of the other variables?

    What a supreme thicko.

    Seperate the different streams of traffic. 1000% more effective than any other measure. Not prohibitively expensive to do in a basic manner. Little cost to incorporate into any new development.

    Car construction. 500% more effective than speed control. The 100 kmh speed limit was introduced at the same time as a Mark II Ford Escort in 1969. Go and crash test that car versus a modern vehicle and you will see car construction is not a ‘relatively fixed variable’

    Proper and regular licencing tests. 100% more effective than speed tests. We currently have a system that allows 98% of people to drive with little effort. If we shifted the level to about 96% of people with some reasonable effort capable of passing then you will get more from that than from our current artificial and arbitrary speed restraints.

    If you think an efficient transport network is childish than you are a callous and selfish individual.

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  28. peterwn (2,933 comments) says:

    Reviewing various comments on traffic enforcement …
    1. Traffic policing – IMO merging of traffic and general policing was justified as it combined duplicated infrastructures such as offices (including local traffic offices and police stations), training, vehicle procurement and communications infrastructures. Downsides were general policing taking bad rap for traffic policing (always unpopular), ‘overqualified’ traffic police people (do they need the high physical fitness of regular police) and insufficient priority given to traffic policing (separate budget streams has sorted this). Also IMO the genii is out of the bottle on this one now, it is extremely unlikely traffic policing would be transferred to NZTA or similar, although general and traffic policing could become separate major divisions of NZ Police with traffic policing having a separate identity could be worth considering.
    2. Speed – to turn the speed enforcement on its head – what would be the outcome if the police ceased speed enforcement completely and concentrated on other ‘traffic’ matters – personally, I suspect the road toll would go up. Alternatively is the current mix of enforcements the optimum for maximum impact on road toll.
    3. Enforcement policies – it is claimed that the police is obsessed with speeding, but AFAIK it is the NZTA that is ‘obsessed’ with speeding and as they grant the road policing budget, they have a large say in enforcement policies. Interesting the NZTA executives are largely ‘faceless’ – I doubt few know who NZTA executives are apart from Andy Knackstedt their PR mouthpiece.
    4. NZTA and Police have in general convinced politicians of both parties that tough speeding enforcement is worthwhile. While there are constant grumblings it has never flared up politically with the Opposition (either National nor Labour) promising to reduce speeding enforcement. About the only significant political ’tilt’ at this was by Simon Power in the late 2000′s, but it gained no political traction then and he pulled his horns in. At a political level, for every grumble about excessive speed enforcement, there are grumbles about speed limits too high, people driving too fast outside schools and other places, etc. This is evidenced by locals erecting fake speed cameras (eg Palmerston, Ophir and Taupo and probably elsewhere), as well as locals taking tea and scones out to speed camera vans.

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  29. Chris2 (704 comments) says:

    Significant advances in medicine keep road crash victims alive now that might not have been saved 20-30 years ago.

    As kowtow above asked – what are the injury statistics?

    The statistic is how many more miles are driven now by the populace, compared to 20-30 years ago?

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  30. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    Scott Chris (5,405 comments) says:
    January 1st, 2014 at 10:55 am
    In 1973 the open road speed limit was lowered to 80kph. Now have a look at the graph and see if you notice anything. Then let your inner child take over and attribute the drop to the oil shock.

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    And the speed limit is now 100kmh and the road toll is now half what it was at 80kmh!!!

    You utter fucking moron.

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  31. SGA (516 comments) says:

    Chris2 at 11:26 am

    As kowtow above asked – what are the injury statistics?

    Some here (from 1980 anyway)
    http://www.transport.govt.nz/research/roadtoll/annualroadtollhistoricalinformation/

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  32. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    At a political level, for every grumble about excessive speed enforcement, there are grumbles about speed limits too high, people driving too fast outside schools and other places, etc. This is evidenced by locals erecting fake speed cameras (eg Palmerston, Ophir and Taupo and probably elsewhere), as well as locals taking tea and scones out to speed camera vans.

    That is a cherry picking argument.

    The worst application of the speed limit currently is on our motorways. Outside schools and black spots are a different set of circumstances. You could decrease the speed limit in those spots at the same time as increase the limit on the motorways.

    Often for the schools and black spots, road design is the real answer. Speed control is sometimes the lazy and selfish response.

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  33. Alan Wilkinson (1,798 comments) says:

    Well said, Sonny. All this was discussed long ago by the road engineer, John Leeming, in his classic “ROAD ACCIDENTS – Prevent or Punish? by J.J. Leeming, Cassell – London, 1969″

    And we’ve seen the silly nonsense about banning talking on mobile phones totally unsupported by any evidence handhelds are more dangerous than handsfree. The predicted consequences have been lots more traffic tickets, most people ignoring the law and no detectable change in crash statistics.

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  34. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    Fuck some of you people are stupid

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  35. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    And the speed limit is now 100kmh and the road toll is now half what it was at 80kmh!!!

    Look at the graph again dimwit and see what happens in 1985 when the open road speed limit is returned to 100kmh. (assuming you can read a graph which I doubt)

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  36. Scott Chris (5,675 comments) says:

    Fixed nature of the other variables?

    Which part of ‘relatively’ don’t you understand?

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  37. Johnboy (13,386 comments) says:

    Seeeing I can read a graph Scott I note the major drop starts to occur around 1990 when car makers started to concentrate on making cars safer by building them better so they could resist collision stresses and starting to incorporate active safety measures such as airbags/active seatbelts etc……moving on to all the electronic safety measures cars have now.

    Not that I think any of that should stand in the way of the Police becoming self-funding by lowering the tolerance to 4kph! :)

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  38. Sonny Blount (1,829 comments) says:

    Scott Chris (5,407 comments) says:
    January 1st, 2014 at 1:05 pm
    And the speed limit is now 100kmh and the road toll is now half what it was at 80kmh!!!

    Look at the graph again dimwit and see what happens in 1985 when the open road speed limit is returned to 100kmh. (assuming you can read a graph which I doubt)

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    Keep on digging.

    You are worse than a ‘climate scientist’ at interpretating a graph.

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  39. jonno1 (76 comments) says:

    @duggledog 8.17am. The Harbour Bridge was opened in 1959 and the clip-ons in 1969. Prior to the movable barriers, lane assignments were by lights only (ticks and crosses). These changed over at roughly the same times of day as the barriers are moved now.

    One of my friends was involved in a head-on crash there (severe injuries but no fatalities). To this day he doesn’t know who was at fault, neither did the police, although he was charged. He didn’t fight it, mainly because he was travelling home northwards earlier than usual (mid-afternoon) at about the time the lights changed over, so conceded that he may have anticipated the changeover due to habit and therefore possibly was travelling one lane too far to the right. OTOH, the other driver was a tourist who may also have been too far to the right. No-one really knows. Soon after that the first movable barriers were installed, in the mid- or late-70s I think.

    I don’t recall the accident rate being as high as you suggest, however there’s no question that poor layout was a major contributor. Have also just remembered the three-lane configuration of Manukau Rd and some other arterial routes in the 70s. The centre lane was for passing in either direction! It seemed to work back then – simpler times I suppose.

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  40. peterwn (2,933 comments) says:

    Sonny – cherry picking, perhaps, but have you any other explanation for why the politicians do not rein in speeding enforcement.

    As for road design being an issue, it is, but the nation has only so much money to spend on roads and the Green Party thinks it is too much already – so does Labour – they have promised to can the SH1 highway of national importance north of Warkworth (aka as ‘Holiday Highway’) and put the saving into Len’s trains and a dozen other projects.

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  41. kowtow (6,690 comments) says:

    Police obsession with speed?

    No, it’s an obsession with exceeding the speed limit.

    Some dumb fuck can drive down my road (quiet ,suburban,narrow etc)at 50kph and be perfectly within the law(from a speed point of view)……..but she’s definitely dangerous and more of a menace than someone doing 106 kph on a straight open section of motorway.

    Who gets pinged?

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  42. Jim (385 comments) says:

    If you try to find jumps in the graph where speed limits have been tweaked then you can’t see the forest for the trees.

    The steady decline in fatalities per 10,000 vehicles over the past 40 years – with an open road speed limit the same as it was back then – shows that the open road speed limit is *nothing* to do with the 5-6x decrease in fatalities that has happened over that time.

    For sure, speed is a factor at the place and time of most fatal accidents, but tweaking the limit is not where the real enduring fatality-reducing safety changes are made. Speed is the ‘bikeshed argument’ of road safety.

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  43. Jim (385 comments) says:

    @peterwn – “have you any other explanation for why the politicians do not rein in speeding enforcement.”

    Perhaps because speed is something that simpletons can grasp, and is relatively politically neutral.

    Meaningful changes like compulsory insurance and mandatory minimum safety requirements for vehicle registration become politically charged. “Taking old and unsafe cars off the road will disadvantage the poor”, etc.

    And as you already noted – improving the road infrastructure also gets the political “holiday highways for the rich” treatment from the anti-progress crowd.

    So we’re back to playing with speed limits in spite of the fact that safer cars and better roads have cut the road toll by a factor of 6.

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  44. Harriet (4,010 comments) says:

    Jim#

    That’s right.

    Around the very late 80′s or early 90′s they changed the law where young drivers were not allowed to carry passangers after 10pm. Prior to that they bought in serious drink driving penalties. Plus the population was inundated by the media with the high road toll at Easter ect and approaching 1000 for the year.

    A large proportion of people who were killed back then, were passengers in cars on rural roads at night times. Young people coming home from the pub with their mates. Older men too.

    With all of those laws starting to take place the road toll soon went down. But none was to do with speeding being targeted. Also, I think there were about the same amount of crashes in those rural areas, but there were simply less passangers in the cars who could be killed. Just the driver was.

    Speed then is now really the only major indicator left[other than learner drivers] that the police can make inroads on. But even that is getting harder and harder for them to do.

    At Easter for example, the police will COME OUT AND SAY ON TV “If you speed more than 4k over the limit we will give you a ticket” and at the end of easter when the road toll is only 7 dead compared to the 8 the year before that, we then READ IN THE PAPER that ‘this is working as the road toll has been reduced by more than 13% in this short period of time’.

    The road toll won’t go down much further IMO. It’s about where it will always be. It’s mostly now a reflection of ‘stupidity’ on the roads than anything else.

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  45. peterwn (2,933 comments) says:

    Jim – The call for compulsory third party property damage insurance has been round for years, even 50 years ago, the Power Boards’ annual conference passed a hardy annual resolution calling for this so they collect off those who wrapped their cars around power poles. Incidentally in UK you only need to carry 15000 pounds of third party insurance and this covers third party injury/ death. This is frankly peanuts and is little more than a token gesture – it will not fully compensate for a death or even a t-boned Roller or top level Bimmer. Following UK precedent any compulsory third party property insurance would be capped at 20,000 dollars. Frankly the most noise for compulsory third party insurance comes from people with a cradle to grave sense of entitlement.

    As for mandatory minimum safety requirements, NZ already has these, and collateral measures such as allowing Jap imports and ‘canning’ an uneconomic automotive assembly industry greatly improved the average quality of vehicles on the road and also enabled those who used motorbikes out of necessity to buy cars.

    While compulsory third party insurance and very high standards for vehicles would please urban people on moderate + incomes, it has the potential to politically alienate poor and rural people.

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  46. Jim (385 comments) says:

    peterwn, I don’t gather anything from your comment that contradicts my “speed is the simple variable to argue over” vs “changes to vehicle regulations are politically charged”.

    The point of compulsory insurance is not the amount of cover – it is the cost of the insurance. It just makes it a lot less economic for a young driver to own a cheap and powerful (or modified) car.

    I just tried an online quote for 3rd party from AA insurance using my own details, but using Whangamomona as the vehicle location (rural enough). Result: fortnightly $4.76. That’s actually a lot cheaper than in the city.

    Then I hit the back button and changed the car to a 1999 Subaru WRX STi, halved my age, and changed to a restricted license. The quote: “We don’t currently provide cover for drivers aged 24 years or younger for the make or model of the vehicle that you specified.”

    That is exactly the point of requiring 3rd party. Some risk assessment on the car+driver combo.

    NZ’s vehicle safety requirements are rather toothless. You can take you pick of a *single rule* (frontal impact) from other countries safety standards. This is way short of what those countries require in full.

    All in the ‘too politically expensive’ basket.

    Speed is easy to tweak and argue (E ∝ mv²), even if marginal changes have no enduring impact on safety. Politicians love speed. The NZ government’s crown limos are safe at any speed.

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  47. UrbanNeocolonialist (133 comments) says:

    No-one ever addresses the life lost through slowing traffic down. If average speed is 50km/hr and 4 million people each spend an average 100 hours a year in car then a 1km/hr drop in average speed is 8 million hours extra spent in cars – cutting into leisure (as well as productive) time.

    A human life has at best about 500,000 wakeful hours, so that 1km/hr costs about 16 wasted lives per year (not to mention huge economic costs). Would a 10km/hr increase kill 160 more people? From the look of those graphs it is highly unlikely. I have always driven as close to the upper tolerance band as I can (when conditions allow) and it has saved me hundreds of hours in my life, all added to my precious leisure time.

    For certain one should never listen to the anecdotal accounts or propaganda of small special interests (eg the bereaved or the police) for what is in essence a policy matter that should be rationally governed by statistical and economic analysis as it has such a major impact on the daily lives, free time, enjoyment and happiness of all kiwis.

    Leaving that aside the police may claim an impact, but the really big factors that have reduced road deaths are:
    1/ Car design, air bags, crush zones, better handling, better brakes, occasionally better acceleration to allow safer overtaking.
    2/ Fewer motorbikes (aka organ-doners, down to about 50k now from 140k in 1980)
    3/ Better roads, more passing lanes and more miles driven on roads with no opposing traffic.
    4/ Probably a reduction of drink driving.

    I recall reading some years ago that Police statistics call alcohol a ‘factor’ in an accident if anyone in the car (driver or not) has been drinking (even if they are not over the limit), or even if alcohol is simply being carried in the boot, so I doubt the alcohol/accident stats are credible, which is a pity when it comes to informing policy.

    More two lane motorways would make the biggest difference and should be prioritised for the additional economic benefits they bring with reduced transportation costs for business, but an increase to 110-120km/hr on 2 lane roads with no opposing traffic (as the rest of western world does with low fatality rates) is long overdue.

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  48. freemark (324 comments) says:

    Silly me just turned on the IdiotBox and caught the news. The van that went down a cliff Napier Taupo Hwy. The bloody police keep the road totally closed for 4-5 hours, leaving thousands stranded in their vehicles. What is with these idiots that they can’t do a fast investigation, take some measurements & pics, let the rescue services in/out etc and still let traffic flow. It is sometimes very hard to keep respect for these people, when they seem so blithely ignorant of the travelling public having timetables, deadlines etc. I’m guessing it only happens here & Aus, and is to do with the Victorian Road Policing control freaks.

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  49. wikiriwhis business (3,286 comments) says:

    ‘I recall reading some years ago that Police statistics call alcohol a ‘factor’ in an accident if anyone in the car (driver or not) has been drinking (even if they are not over the limit), or even if alcohol is simply being carried in the boot, ‘

    ‘Golden boy’ fights for life

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9572443/Golden-boy-fights-for-life

    a trauma team worked furiously to save 5-month-old Manmeet and five others seriously injured when their van veered off the Napier-Taupo Road.

    There were several cans of Red Bull lying around the accident site.

    If it’s not alcohol it’s energy drinks…..which should rationally keep you awake

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