RIP Charlotte Dawson

February 22nd, 2014 at 3:29 pm by David Farrar

The Daily Telegraph reports:

has been found dead at her Woolloomooloo home.

The popular television presenter is understood to have been found by a security guard this morning.

Dawson, 47, had long battled .

Police confirmed they were called to Woolloomooloo wharf at 11.18am and there were no suspicious circumstances to the death.

This is very sad. Dawson was very open about her battle with depression. Many were supportive of her, but there were quite a few who were incredibly nasty towards her on Twitter and urged her to kill herself. I hope those people who took part in her tormenting go through a period of soul searching.

I didn’t know Charlotte first hand, but know several people who did know her well, and they always spoke warmly of her sense of humour and generosity. Both her passing, and the manner of it, are very sad.

For those who may need assistance, the depression helpline is 0800 111 757.

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59 Responses to “RIP Charlotte Dawson”

  1. wreck1080 (3,800 comments) says:

    She didn’t seem able to cope with anonymous trolls — hope they are satisfied now!!!

    Very sad.

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  2. duggledog (1,431 comments) says:

    I have personally worked with her. She was all right, bye Charlie XXX

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  3. Rex Widerstrom (5,327 comments) says:

    In the 40s & 50s our movie stars & politicians were idealised by the public and protected by the media. They were either good or bad, right or wrong, with no possibility allowed for that they were ordinary, flawed (like all of us) people and simply elevated to a position in the public eye.

    Then we went through a period where we matured and were able to accept the reality that rugged action heroes might actually be gay, beautiful actresses might be deeply troubled, even that a politician might change his or her position on an issue in light of new information.

    It seems from the reaction to Charlotte Dawson’s honesty with regard to her troubles, and other similar issues, that we’re losing that capacity again, driven by PR agencies’ insistence that their clients remain “aspirational brands” (i.e. unrealistically perfect) at all times, and the proliferation of shallow “infotainment” TV shows and magazine content.

    Her fate will undoubtedly discourage others in the public eye to confessing to their battles with mental illness, alcohol, drug addiction and the like… confessions which give strength and hope to many “ordinary” people fighting the same battles. As such, her passing is a greater tragedy than the loss of one life.

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  4. Monique Angel (264 comments) says:

    She was killed by the tall Poppy Syndrome of Socialism. It would have been a different outcome for her career in the US where talent and beauty is admired. Poor Gal.

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  5. big bruv (13,552 comments) says:

    Seems that many small minded Kiwis could not deal with what Dawson has to say about New Zealand. The fact of the matter is that Dawson was right.
    As others have said, I hope those who hounded this lady feel shit today.

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  6. Viking2 (11,261 comments) says:

    Really, so it was everybody else’s fault then?

    Sorry but she created her own issues.
    As for blaming various forms of media. Well they can be arsewipes but you can choose to remove yourself from that influence. e.g. don’t bother with FB,Twitter etc etc.
    Find a better class of friend and remove oneself from the atmosphere which causes the problem.

    Not saying depression is not hard to deal with. Been there and done that. Never far away but one has to control ones brain food.

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  7. Monique Angel (264 comments) says:

    Have to agree with V2. Gotta take responsibility for your own actions and harden the fuck up in a cruel Socialist world.
    This is why I teach my nieces the following mantra:
    Sticks and Stones will break my bones.
    If you come any closer I’ll break your face”.

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  8. corrigenda (142 comments) says:

    So sad that a woman of her years succumbed to what I term “teenage tech” and did nothing to distance herself from it when things turned ugly. If you are being bullied on Twitter or Facebook; delete your profile. Simple as that!!!

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  9. bc (1,350 comments) says:

    Wow, a post from DPF saddened about the death of Charlotte Dawson, and Monique Angel turns it into a rant about socialism. Twice!
    Breaking news – socialism killed Charlotte Dawson!!

    Is Monique Angel the new redbaiter?

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  10. gazzmaniac (2,319 comments) says:

    There is such thing as an “off” button. It is shameful that a 47 year old woman can’t grasp the concept that the bullies won’t be able to contact her if she unplugs.

    I notice John Key is on Facebook putting his condolences. We’ll probably see a new law banning cyber trolling and flame wars next week.

    As an aside, it is my opinion that the internet shouldn’t be taken too seriously and if you’re offended don’t watch.

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  11. Reid (16,103 comments) says:

    I find it regrettable the papers don’t mention the “s” word. If that’s what it was which seems likely.

    Sure we can all read between the lines when it happens but why this hallucination that merely mentioning the cause is going to thereby make others think about doing it? That’s nuts and betrays a fundamental misunderstanding of human behaviour. No-one goes and does it because they read about someone else doing it. It’s the ultimate intimate decision and anyone who contemplates it is not going to be influenced by reading about someone who did it, not one iota.

    The point is the ban on reporting it when it happens also prevents any subsequent publicity on the subsequent fallout from all those who loved them, which if there were extensive public material on that aspect, is the one thing which might actually prevent others who are considering it from going through with it, if anything will.

    In case some misunderstand, this is not ghoulish prurience, it’s simple recognition of the many comments from family who have gone through this, that they wouldn’t wish this on anyone and if there were anything good that could possibly come from their experience, it would be preventing that in some other family, even just one.

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  12. mara (752 comments) says:

    Twitter, facebook and other media sites will create “grief porn” over this. But not for long. They will soon look for another more current, sad event to flatuate about in the sure knowledge that its followers are too dim to realise how dim they are.

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  13. Harriet (4,614 comments) says:

    Thoughtful posts Reid & Viking 2.

    Due to PR & PC ect, the only thing now reported by the media on suicide is sadness, sympathy, loss, regrets, thoughts go out to family and all concerned, was a wonderful human being ect – and who was depressed.

    IMHO – this may feed straight into those who are very depressed and/or thinking of suicide, as they feel lonely, lost and without friends and love, and may believe that by committing suicide is then a way to get it all. And they may also believe that it proves to those who ‘bully’ them in anyway that it is they who will have no friends, support ect.

    Suicide is the most selfish thing one can do, you may be getting away from all your troubles, but those who you leave behind are the ones who have far far more to deal with. Moreso the children and parents. That is the message that should be sent out via twitter ect by the likes of Key – so the bullies see the real damage they are doing to those who stay behind.

    However as Viking 2 suggests, she didn’t seem to help herself by not staying away from those who were bullying her – switching off from complete strangers who are being negative should be the first thing one does.

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  14. dog_eat_dog (761 comments) says:

    I’d like to take a moment to shout out to all those people who are bullied online who don’t have the opportunity to draw attention to it by dragging it through the press repeatedly and that won’t have an army of people at their disposal to help them out.

    Push through guys, shit always get better.

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  15. bc (1,350 comments) says:

    Reid: “I find it regrettable the papers don’t mention the “s” word.”
    You mean socialism??

    It was socialism that killed Charlotte Dawson!

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  16. Dave_NZ (1 comment) says:

    some of your comments are way out of line. You need to study depression. Its a sickness. Its a real shame that a 47 yr old thinks that ending her life, is better than living it. She was NOT a coward. She was a sick troubled woman. Would you all be saying it if someone like Sir John Kirwin did this… I doubt it. Having experienced suicide within our family, I have the deepest sympathy for her friends and family… may she rest in peace

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  17. duggledog (1,431 comments) says:

    Reid –

    Of course it was suicide. She just wasn’t a survivor, and more to the point she lived in a poisonous world full of c***s. Unreal and unwholesome, pretty much since she was a teenager. A decent man by her side and kids she could never have would have helped a lot.

    My memory of her is that she was articulate, kind, genuinely concerned for others and with a pretty sharp sense of humour!

    The reason suicides don’t get reported of course is because they think it will normalise it and people will start to copycat. This may or not be reasonable – who would want to try changing the status quo? Bags not. We already have an average of two people a day taking their lives, disproportionately Maori by the way.

    On that note, Shane Jones made an interesting point recently about suicide. As we all know, Maori tangis can over-egg the deceased’s achievements, what sort of person they were etc and he was concerned that younger more impressionable kids see this and think, ‘I want my name up in lights too’.

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  18. Left Right and Centre (2,876 comments) says:

    She beat the memory of 185 people who wanted to live life as much as they could from the start of the news.

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  19. Alan Wilkinson (1,848 comments) says:

    Yes, I had some very friendly exchanges with her on the Stuff blogs but as others have said she was like a moth to a flame when morons criticised her. A sad, fragile waste.

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  20. Nostalgia-NZ (5,038 comments) says:

    This from Reid….’it would be preventing that in some other family, even just one.’

    Is just a cliché, used in all sorts of situations that have made it quite banal and pointless.

    This from Harriet…..’However as Viking 2 suggests, she didn’t seem to help herself by not staying away from those who were bullying her – switching off from complete strangers who are being negative should be the first thing one does.’

    Fairly shallow understanding of what might underlie a specific suicide. In Charlotte’s case (and duggledog touches upon it above, where he mentions a more ‘normalised’ life may have made a big difference to her) she was a public figure, feeding in particular from approval and it’s fairly naïve not to consider that she might not use her ‘tools’ against those that harassed her. At this point we don’t know how much that harassment may have played in her suicide, but for somebody who craved approval and who was quite possibly plunged into darkness by disapproval or criticism it’s easier to understand why she may have continued to be ‘engaged.’ That engagement with an initial confidence that her wit or rebuke would see them off, then when it didn’t begin to be preoccupied with the thought that if the person(s) really knew her they would like her, to perhaps finally threatening to harm herself in a futile belief that rather than feed them it would touch something in them and they would respond with kindness, even begin to ‘like’ her. Saying she could simply switch off from that is denying the complexity of depression and other such illnesses.

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  21. Harriet (4,614 comments) says:

    Nostalgia#

    I wasn’t suggesting that it was the only reason for her depression – it’s just very unhelpful for someone in her position to be reading that negative stuff I would have thouight. The less of it each day the better I’d think it would be for her.

    I agree with all of your post – well put. Cheers.

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  22. Rex Widerstrom (5,327 comments) says:

    Nostalgia-NZ:

    What an excellent post. I’ve known a lot of “celebrities” in media and political life and your insight into the psyche of many is unerringly inaccurate and very well put.

    People often take my reticence in social situations for arrogance or snobbery, figuring anyone who not only copes with being on TV and radio and on stage at a political rally, but who clearly enjoys themselves, must have an enormous surfeit of confidence. In fact those situations are relatively controlled, the reactions of others predictable, and most people constrained by politeness. And by switching on the set, or showing up, they’ve indicated they’re interested in you. Social situations are far scarier.

    Paradoxically many people with fragile psyches are drawn to media and similar jobs. I haven’t discussed it with them, but I strongly suspect your reasoning is right. And once that’s your trade, it’s going to damage you economically if you don’t promote your “brand” through social media – so if you’re bullied via that medium you’re in a Catch-22. Especially, I’d imagine, if you’re a woman over 40 trying to compete in an industry that values youth over experience.

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  23. MT_Tinman (3,043 comments) says:

    ft Right and Centre (2,308 comments) says:
    February 22nd, 2014 at 7:33 pm
    She beat the memory of 185 people who wanted to live life as much as they could from the start of the news.

    Considering the 185 died three years ago I think that sums up NZ “news” as good as anything I’ve ever seen.

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  24. MT_Tinman (3,043 comments) says:

    big bruv (12,118 comments) says:
    February 22nd, 2014 at 4:55 pm
    Seems that many small minded Kiwis could not deal with what Dawson has to say about New Zealand. The fact of the matter is that Dawson was right.

    BB, I would agree if I knew who this sheila was.

    Despite the fact that I’ve heard of her (recently, when she advised a noise maker to leave NZ publicly) I have no idea who the hell she is (was) or what she ever did (the list of TV shows she “starred” in describe shows I’ve never heard of let alone watched).

    Obviously to you she was important but to me she was a nothing. To me she may have as well as been yet another “actor” who went to Oz because she couldn’t cut it in NZ.

    Maybe she was.

    Maybe Rex can educate me otherwise.

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  25. big bruv (13,552 comments) says:

    MT

    I don’t actually know what she was “famous” for either. My point is that because she made one or two truthful comments some small minded Kiwis (this proving the point she was making) decided to try and tear her down. The fact that she apparently had a history of mental illness (which is exactly what depression is) made it all the more disgusting in my book.

    She was not important to me at all other than for being another human who on the surface of it did not deserve to be treated this way for telling the truth.

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  26. Zapper (962 comments) says:

    BB you are correct.

    The people who told her, via social media, to kill herself were not people upset about her correct opinions about NZ media. They were most likely teenagers, who didn’t like her social media profile. To be fair, I thought she made some social media mistakes. But I would never tell her to kill herself, like so many did. What she said about the NZ media is completely unrelated to the abuse she received. It fits into your narrative, I know, but that’s not what happened.

    Personally, having known more people than I care to admit who have given up, this hits me hard despite the fact I didn’t know her. As a mid thirties Kiwi, I feel I’ve personally known too many people who have chosen this path, sadly including my father. There is no reason.

    RIP

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  27. Zapper (962 comments) says:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?list=RDIdHUD4mstAs&v=uGDA0Hecw1k

    It’s too late when we die people. I know this is overly serious for kiwiblog, but life can be tough sometimes and you fuckers are a great release. Even you dime.

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  28. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    I can’t believe this was the lead item on the news tonight. It should’ve been given a few seconds late in the bulletin.

    Dawson was highly opinionated and was critical of others. For someone who didn’t like bullying, her attitude towards others was curious.

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  29. Dave Mann (1,187 comments) says:

    I don’t use Twitter or Facebook, but from what I have read this poor woman felt compelled to flood the interweb incessantly like a massive 24/7 waterfall of her every thought, feeling and opinion. Maybe the constant stress of this living in a self-created goldfish bowl got too much for her? Sad, but as others have written here, there is the option of a cyber off button before pressing the actual and irreversible off button. I wonder if there’s any competent help available for FB and Twitter addiction and whether they are recognized as such?

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  30. Aredhel777 (282 comments) says:

    :/

    The last line…

    http://m.aww.com.au/news-features/in-the-mag/2012/9/charlotte-dawson-i-gave-up-my-baby-for-my-husband/

    Charlotte Dawson has revealed she aborted her child with swimmer Scott Miller because he didn’t want any distractions in the lead-up to the Sydney Olympics.

    [...]

    “I could sense some hesitation in Scott,” she says. “My due date would clash with the 2000 Olympic Games and this was very concerning.

    “Everything Scott had done was leading up to this moment and nothing could stand in his way, so it was decided that we would terminate the child and try again later. Who needed a developing foetus when a gold medal was on offer, eh?”

    On the day of the termination, Charlotte says she was in “total turmoil”. Her husband accompanied her to the clinic, but “couldn’t cope with the atmosphere” so left her alone.

    After the procedure, Charlotte went home and tried to behave as though nothing had happened, but says something had changed forever.

    “I felt a shift,” she says. “Maybe it was hormonal, but I felt the early tinges of what I can now identify as my first experience with depression.”

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  31. bereal (3,137 comments) says:

    Charlotte who ?

    oh shit, that Charlotte.

    did she have another hair extension that didn’t reach her expectations ? tragit.

    people should get real.

    Look out for the insightfull in depth discussion on the subject from Anna Guy in your next girly mag.

    Don’t come to any conclusion till youve heard from Anna.

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  32. David Garrett (6,731 comments) says:

    Although I didnt know her, I find this very sad …we had a suicide out here recently of a very well liked guy struggling with depression …as (almost) always, a bloody tragedy as this is…(My “almost” qualifier refers to suicides of people with terminal illness, which this almost certainly wasn’t)

    As the father of kids growing up in the internet age, this sends a chill up my spine…if a 47 year old woman couldn’t just “turn it off” what hope a hormonal teenager very subject to peer pressure and how he/she is perceived?

    Poor lady….I hope the c…ts who urged her to destroy themselves are visited with their own torment of whatever kind …

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  33. bereal (3,137 comments) says:

    Garrett

    of course it is sad.
    But, what a silly stupid analogy you make.
    So, in your opinion if someone like CD tops herself then there is no hope for any teenager subject to
    peer pressure ?
    Do you really believe that kids like that have no hope ?
    Shit, if you are right they will be committing suicide like lemmings.
    You need to get real my friend.

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  34. Reid (16,103 comments) says:

    “My due date would clash with the 2000 Olympic Games and this was very concerning… Who needed a developing foetus when a gold medal was on offer, eh?”

    Regardless of Charlotte, that speaks volumes about our priorities as a society. So the road starts when a human life in put into second place not even for a mere bauble but for the potential of gaining one and it ends because, from what others have said above, she deemed the opinions of others in respect of her own self more important than her own.

    If that is the picture and it may not be but IF it is, I hope Charlotte becomes an icon representing a casualty of all that is twisted and wrong with our modern western values, for that is what she is.

    I don’t expect that to happen since the question represents a challenge to all that is valued, all that is striven for and all that is thought about in many to most people in our western society: money, status and ‘likes.’

    But I wish and hope for her death to be considered in that light. Not for me, but for all the other Charlottes and Scotts out there of which there are millions, and counting.

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  35. Aredhel777 (282 comments) says:

    Too right, Reid. You said what I was attempting to drive at.

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  36. Harriet (4,614 comments) says:

    Aredhel777#

    “I felt a shift,” she says.[after abortion] “Maybe it was hormonal, but I felt the early tinges of what I can now identify as my first experience with depression.”

    Well that definatly won’t be repeated by the NZ media.

    It’s a shame though, as it is likely that most women suffer depression from abortion as they usually carry that secret around all to themselves – without the usual release mechanism of talking to others.

    I do think that women who have abortions do suffer from depression, as it has been said that “The siblings of those who have been aborted feel a sense of loss when they find out.” The mother herself is sure then to feel a loss a lot harder than the siblings would – I’d suspect. The fact is a feotus does become a baby, so the question will always remain “What if….” and the mother and siblings may well think of that a lot at times through out life.

    Raising children is a positive thing to do, and we hear that all the time by those who deal in child neglect and poverty as it is ‘what should be done’. To put it bluntly, those who have abortions have then done the opposite – they neglected their child – as you cannot ever get away from the fact that a feotus becomes a child.

    Ironicly, I’m not raising this matter for the reasons that I’m anti-abortion – but because of suicide – and in this case it was a women’s life. Something that us men are told we have no knowledge in.

    So should I really car about female suicide – am I allowed to ?

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  37. goldnkiwi (1,159 comments) says:

    Rarely is the timing of babies convenient, I find it sad if that was her one and only chance of having a child, if one was wanted, which it sounds like it was.

    Epiphanies’ usually come too late.

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  38. Harriet (4,614 comments) says:

    Abortion does serious harm to a women’s health, and without knowledge about abortion then men like their husbands and fathers cannot help them.

    But if men were ever told what abortion is really all about, they would probably then protect their wifes and daughters from the damage that feminists can cause them, and ask for abortion to be wound back and the emphisis placed on contraception.

    Talking fully about women’s health is probably the best way to educate men to treat women with respect in the first place – so that they are prepared to Marry them if they get them pregnant – rather than see them decline into despair – if they ever see them again at all that is.

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  39. bereal (3,137 comments) says:

    Reid
    You are correct in your assumption @ 11.00
    Fools will read all sorts of silly shit into this story,.
    See Garrett @10.49 for eg.

    But its quite simple
    CD was an icon of all that is twisted and wrong with “western society” in NZ today as u say.

    Why else does the media idolise the likes of airheads like Charlotte, Anna Guy, Sally Ridge, et al ?

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  40. Harriet (4,614 comments) says:

    “…..Why else does the media idolise the likes of airheads like Charlotte, Anna Guy, Sally Ridge, et al ?….”

    White female liberal ‘victims’.

    Shayne Warne’s ex-wife is an airhead who got herslef on a tv show with the aid of the media feminists. There’s lots of others. Guy aside, these women have probably caused a fair few of their own problems. But it is their husbands who are portrayed as being the ‘problem’. Or their male bosses ect.

    Their TV ‘appearances’ are to send out the image that ‘this women’s behaviour is appropriate’.

    It is all because the left needs to justify some women’s poor manners/behaviour to young females, and so they publicise ‘examples’ of particular female subsets as ‘normal women’ – as all women who are fronting tv would be expected to be ‘normal’. Other women who are just like them then have someone ‘important’ who they can identify with – and that then justifies their manners/behaviour in their eyes.

    But no women like these are ever portrayed by the media being in politics, business, healthcare, policing, or education. As none exist. Only Pravda have them.

    Their behaviour is not normal – it’s far far less than ordinary.

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  41. Reboot (95 comments) says:

    gazzmaniac (2,168 comments) says:
    February 22nd, 2014 at 6:09 pm

    There is such thing as an “off” button. It is shameful that a 47 year old woman can’t grasp the concept that the bullies won’t be able to contact her if she unplugs.

    Unless specified in her suicide note, how do you know that it was social media that was the significant cause of her death, and not something else in her life?

    It’s shameful that you find it appropriate that now is the time to be implying that someone is intellectually challenged when they have just died.

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  42. ross69 (3,652 comments) says:

    Yes, it shouldn’t be assumed that online trolls had anything to do with her death. Just as it was assumed that a prank call to Kate Middleton was responsible for the death of nurse Jacinda Saldanha, when she had tried to commit suicide at least twice previously and had a history of depression.

    But I repeat that CD was herself a bully, desiring at least one fashion designer to be dead and contacting the employer of one troll, forcing the person to lose her job. It was a case of do as I say, not as I do.

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  43. Alan (1,080 comments) says:

    She appeared to never grow up; a quote in the paper today references a boyfriend half her age, sigh.

    You can’t live in a twentysomething world when you’re pushing 50. Why would you even try ?

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  44. Southern Raider (1,734 comments) says:

    The sad thing is people like Charlotte feel the need to remains in the limelight and NZs poor excuse for a celebrity circuit. Many have borderline talent and so rely on stunts to remain in the media. Of course when this fails it all goes pear shaped.

    The risk is with main stream and social media they will love you for a minute and then spend the next 10 years crucifying you.

    I think the lesson is just be who you are. If your a nice warm and caring person like people said Charlotte was then be that and you don’t need the $60K per annum flash apartment you can’t afford or the 24 year old toy boy.

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  45. Longknives (4,678 comments) says:

    She is front page news on all the Sunday rags today- This may well be the best publicity stunt of her life! (and we all know being a famous-for-being-famous ‘Socialite’ is all about making the magazines and headlines..)

    *Apologies if this appears insensitive but Auckland’s ‘Socialites’ and so-called ‘A-Listers’ are the nastiest, most shallow bunch of frauds you will ever meet. The Sally Ridges of this world wouldn’t piss on ‘little people’ like us if we were on fire…So why the outpouring of grief when one of their number passes?

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  46. Nostalgia-NZ (5,038 comments) says:

    ‘You can’t live in a twentysomething world when you’re pushing 50. Why would you even try ?’

    For the reason you gave, at least parts of her never grew up. From what I understand she didn’t have a relationship with her birth parents, that brings with itself a part of her that would always be unfulfilled and stilted in growth. Apparently she did ‘try’ to remedy that in her life and was rebuffed.

    This quote from her taken from above…“I felt a shift,” she says. “Maybe it was hormonal, but I felt the early tinges of what I can now identify as my first experience with depression…” expresses something profound where talking about the value of the Olympics and the ‘inconvenience’ of a baby by comparison. Of course the Olympic dream of someone she loved and lost was never realised, possibly damning Charlotte and her ex partner for a decision that if not taken may have been the fulfilment of Charlotte’s life long after he left her for another ‘dream.’ A comment from her that would cause most to pause and consider the consequences of decisions compelled upon others for their own apparent benefit.

    This reminds me of a poignant comment made a few years ago in relation to cyber harassment where a person associated with somebody being harassed was ill and the effect of that was compounded by the harassment – in summary the associate said that ‘you take your victims as they are’ – meaning that there is no judgement in favour of the harasser, because he or she didn’t know or care that the target’s family, for example, were badly affected by the harassment. This also covers the fact that it is not the responsibility or the ‘bad luck’ of the person targeted, that they might be of a semi fragile nature, suffering other stress at the time or unable to ‘harden up’ – all of that lies with the perpetrator for not allowing the other person to go about their life satisfactory or unsatisfactory as the perp might believe the value of that life to be.

    Unfortunately, Charlotte’s death will leave questions and raise other questions that won’t now have answers. But one thing for sure is that she pin pointed publicly things in her life which had caused her distress, something which even for a person not suffering from depression would be hard pushed not to link together in some form as to appear an oppressive chain of events that might make death seem like an attractive alternative.

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  47. Dave Mann (1,187 comments) says:

    Excuse me… what…? This shallow self server snuffed out a potential human life because the TIMING was a bit inconvenient? And later she went and sobbed to the MEDIA and gave interview(s) about it…?

    She obviously had a very poorly developed sense of personal dignity and topping herslf was probably seen in her eyes as the ultimate media stunt. Geez…. unbelievable.

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  48. stephieboy (2,518 comments) says:

    Did depression or did the social media and celebrity circuit kill her? You could go in endless circles arguing about this, but at the end of the day Charlotte is a human being with all the baggage that carries, both the good and the bad This fact alone warrants at least a grain of empathy and a drop of the milk of human kindness.
    Well said DPF.!

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  49. All_on_Red (1,488 comments) says:

    Soooo, how did the Auction go?

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  50. David Garrett (6,731 comments) says:

    beryl: You got it…I am a complete fool…you on the other hand, an anonymous internet troll, are the fount of wisdom..

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  51. big bruv (13,552 comments) says:

    DG

    Do you think bereal has a drinking problem?

    Could he/she be Winnie in disguise?

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  52. David Garrett (6,731 comments) says:

    BB: Now I come to think of it, his more florid posts always seem to be fairly late at night…but to be fair (I always try to be fair) he has a point re media idolisation of “airheads”…the Ridges, both mere and fille, seem to be particularly vapid individuals – albeit less so that Ms Watson – and I have never quite understood why the media made them “celbebrities”…small country; limited choice; superficially attractive perhaps??

    Poor Ms Dawson appears to have been a “real person” who for some reason, her illness or her personality or whatever, was unable to exist without having the spotlight on her…I find it quite scary that friends who saw her very recently saw no sign of her impending suicide…the same was true of my friend out here who shot himself about 8 hours after telling me that the new meds he was on were doing him good, and that he felt better than he had for some time…

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  53. ChardonnayGuy (1,183 comments) says:

    Thank you, David. What a terrible event. My condolences to Charlotte’s grieving family and loved ones. As for those who drove her to this, my contempt is unbounded.

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  54. goldnkiwi (1,159 comments) says:

    OMG next we will be told re the sanctity of human life by a murderer, how ironic that there is talk of ‘victims’. Wrong place wrong time for them. Sanctimony personified who far better deserves the brickbats than Charlotte in my opinion. Charlotte made a choice, or it could have been yet another accidental overdose from self medicating.

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  55. stephieboy (2,518 comments) says:

    Golden kiwi , unfortunately things are a bit more complicated than a so called mere choice about ” depression.”Read more carefully and thoughtfully DPF. He knows many who knew her well and spoke highly of her.
    What is really sad is the way many who seem to gloat over other’s misfortune , human frailty and falling over.

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  56. goldnkiwi (1,159 comments) says:

    Which is why I said accidental overdose perhaps, I have no issues with her at all, I do have issues regarding some ‘commentators’ on her death though.

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  57. goldnkiwi (1,159 comments) says:

    ‘Celebrity is such a subjective word. Does a celebrity always want to be recognised, no matter what the public circumstance?

    For myself, recently a ‘movie star’ came in to my business, he was wearing patched farm overalls and was clearly helping out on a dairy farm. He has been in here before and I have given him a bit of cheek.

    I didn’t know whether to give him cheek or not this last time. I wasn’t sure if he wanted to be recognised, I was trying to be sensitive but I think he was miffed that he wasn’t acknowledged. Such is ‘celebrity.

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  58. Ed Snack (1,794 comments) says:

    For those with serious depression, nobody drives you “to it”, you drive yourself up to the edge and push yourself over. Because you’re not the person you were or could be. Depression is internal in that way, other people can have an impact, but none of it really matters, if you are depressed enough either you will successfully seek help, or…

    I lost a friend just very recently, suicide from depression. No one attacked him or criticised him in this sort of overt way, but it seems he found the implied criticisms from just living too much.

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  59. RRM (9,638 comments) says:

    I have a relative who is prone to bouts of depression, and she shares Charlotte Dawson’s trait of really lashing out at people and the world in general when she is down.

    Even when it’s someone you love, and even when you know it’s the depression speaking not really the person you love, it’s still pretty hard sometimes to just absorb all the rage and fury, the horrific and nasty things that depressed people will say to you.

    So when some celebrity comes out publicly firing the sort of things depressed people say… it is no wonder that those who don’t know them from a bar of soap, and don’t know depression, take the words at face value, take offense, and even strike back.

    Charlotte Dawson would have done well to listen to what the PR company actually said, it was good advice – making hugely inflammatory public comments by twitter (eg. that New Zealand is a shit hole country, and Ella O’Connor needs to get out for her own good) is not smart and is not going to endear people, and once they’re said they cannot easily be unsaid.

    But sadly, those are things that the depressed simply don’t care about when they’re down.

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