The race for Hunua heats up

February 10th, 2014 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

is one of the safest seats for National in the country. Retiring MP Paul Hutchison got 66% of the vote in 2011 and the Labour candidate just 17%, giving a majority of 16,797.

With Hutch retiring, many good people are already seeking the nomination.  An additional candidate has just announced they will join the race:

Auckland banker, Seby Reeves, has announced he will be putting his name forward to contest the selection of the Hunua candidate to represent the New Zealand National Party at the General Election later this year.

Mr Reeves is 33 and lives in Auckland with his wife Julie and young son.

Born in Wellington, Mr Reeves attended Scots College where he became Deputy Head Boy and Captain of the 1st XV.  He has degrees in Law and Commerce from Victoria and Otago Universities.

Between 2006 and 2011, Mr Reeves and his wife lived in London where he was a senior lawyer for a large international law firm and HSBC’s investment banking division.  Mr Reeves is currently a Manager in ANZ’s Commercial & Agri banking division.

Mr Reeves is the son of former National MP Graeme Reeves and has been active in the National Party for several years including being a member of the National Party’s Candidate College.

Mr Reeves says, “I am passionate about New Zealand and its politics and absolutely committed to representing the people of Hunua in the next National led government.

I believe I have the skills to be a strong MP and a firm advocate of Hunua issues.”

I don’t know Seby, but do know his father Graeme well. He was one of only two National MPs to hold the Miramar electorate. Labour has held it from 1946 to the current day (now Rongotai) except for Bill Young 1966 to 1981 and Graeme from 1990 to 1993.

I will always have a soft spot for Graeme as he did NZ politics a great public service. He was the MP that initiated the caucus petition to suspend Winston Peters from the National caucus in 1992.

It will be interesting to see who else stands for Hunua. I’m aware of two other declared candidates at this stage.

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28 Responses to “The race for Hunua heats up”

  1. dime (9,606 comments) says:

    CV seems ok, maybe not as good as what Labour will put up though:

    Their candidate went to manukau high school, going all the way to the 7th form. from there she went to Auckland University and in only 5 short years obtained a BA in women’s studies. From there she went to work for the dept of womens affairs before taking a position at the NZ Dairy Workers union, a position that will serve her well in Hunua.

    At the age of 27 she believes she is ready to tell all new zealanders how they should love and whats what!

    How close am i? :)

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  2. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    Mr Reeves attended Scots College where he became Deputy Head Boy and Captain of the 1st XV. He has degrees in Law and Commerce from Victoria and Otago Universities.

    Sigh…

    Mr Reeves is the son of former National MP Graeme Reeves

    Sigh…

    Mr Reeves says, “I am passionate about New Zealand and its politics and absolutely committed to representing the people of Hunua in the next National led government.

    Translation: “I am a tedious, unimaginative bastard”.

    Why can’t one of them say something like: “This country is 30 years behind the times broes and hoes, and Imma gonna come in and fuck some shit up regally”?

    I’d vote for that.

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  3. Pete George (23,133 comments) says:

    That’s not the National way Tom. But an ultra safe electorate would be a good base from which to “fuck some shit up regally”.

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  4. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    On a serious note. What is it with these cookie cutter candidates? I’ve often thought it would be good to ban all children from the same occupation as their parents.

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  5. Sidey (248 comments) says:

    So your parents are successful, positive, action-rather-than-words people then, Tom?

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  6. Sidey (248 comments) says:

    Given we live under a governance system whereby someone will always be making decisions for us as a society, I’d rather have a representative who has actual, real life experience at a senior level.

    Think what you may about law and banking as a career, it sure beats having union bully as a career aspiration. Unless you’re a young bully of course.

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  7. jp_1983 (200 comments) says:

    Tom Jackson (2,061 comments) says:
    February 10th, 2014 at 1:21 pm
    On a serious note. What is it with these cookie cutter candidates? I’ve often thought it would be good to ban all children from the same occupation as their parents.

    Well that will be a good way to destroy the Treaty Gravy Train in a generation

    So maybe its not such a bad idea…

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  8. calendar girl (1,194 comments) says:

    “….. lived in London where he was a senior lawyer for a large international law firm ….” Does that mean he was a partner in the London law firm (depending on the firm, that would be an impressive achievement in his young 30s) or was he one of its army of staff lawyers? Just interested in clarification.

    As a separate issue, if I was on the Hunua electoral roll I would have trouble voting for him unless he learns to speak to voters in ordinary language. Anyone claiming to be “passionate” about something has already shown him/herself to be attracted to platitudes and superlatives. We have enough of MPs like that already.

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  9. Pete George (23,133 comments) says:

    Mr Reeves says, “I am passionate about New Zealand and its politics and absolutely committed to representing the people of Hunua in the next National led government.

    I believe I have the skills to be a strong MP and a firm advocate of Hunua issues.”

    Yes, that’s hardly original, any PR hack without any imagination could come up with something like that. Actually it’s quite depressing.

    In his quest to cram as much crap has he can into a short statement he missed out saying when he thinks the next National led Government will be.

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  10. johnwellingtonwells (126 comments) says:

    Could be better than an ex-policeman and past small-time restauranteur

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  11. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    Given we live under a governance system whereby someone will always be making decisions for us as a society, I’d rather have a representative who has actual, real life experience at a senior level.

    You’re sort of missing my point.

    If people are going to be making decisions for us, we need more than experiences at a senior level. We need a broad range of people from all sectors of society in order to avoid the dreaded groupthink.

    The UK has much more of a problem with this than we do, although we are heading in the same direction – university graduates with the same, narrow academic and professional background to prepare them for politics (in Britain it’s the Oxbridge PPE).

    Take Nick Smith as an example. One of the reasons he’s such an indispensable politician is that he comes from a civil engineering background, and hardly any of the others do.

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  12. wf (388 comments) says:

    “passionate” a word degraded by the endless parade of tv cooks who tell us of their passion.

    I’d mark him down for using it.

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  13. kowtow (7,856 comments) says:

    How much civil engineering has Nick actually done.Been in parliament a very long time,also did he do his Phd as a full or part time student?

    Serious question.

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  14. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    How much civil engineering has Nick actually done.Been in parliament a very long time,also did he do his Phd as a full or part time student?

    I don’t think it would make a difference if he was part time. What matters is that he is an expert civil engineer, and although you aren’t going to be at the cutting edge, the skill set and knowledge you retain are extremely useful because they enable you to deal with those issues from a position of competence.

    Look, everyone I know used to laugh at Lockwood having a PhD in animal nutrition, but in a country based on agriculture isn’t it worth having someone in parliament who actually understands those issues at a fairly deep level?

    We need more STEM people in parliament, and more people from working backgrounds. Middle class lawyers and commerce students are already overrepresented.

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  15. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    Could be better than an ex-policeman and past small-time restauranteur

    You learn a lot doing doing those jobs.

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  16. Elaycee (4,318 comments) says:

    Tom Jackson:

    We need a broad range of people from all sectors of society in order to avoid the dreaded groupthink.

    So that means you won’t approve of the ‘preferred’ background for Labour’s list: trade unionist / political flunkie / media hack / policy researcher / teacher / civil servant.

    Yes?

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  17. tvb (4,229 comments) says:

    He is a talented individual. But dear god why should such a capable person sacrifice himself for politics especially his young family. He is of course an ideal candidate for National. But what a crap life he is about to have.

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  18. nickb (3,673 comments) says:

    I have to agree with Tom Jackson on this (and tvb above, and even Pete George).

    Why would someone who has clearly been very successful in the private sector want to parachute into a safe seat with the National Government, and a National Government gunning for a third term at that? It seems odd timing given he may have to wait 3-4 terms to make Cabinet. Is he just another “rich guy who wants to bolster the CV” like John Key, lacking any actual clear political beliefs?

    Because based off the last few years, we sure have enough of them in Parliament. Who would know what Nikki Kaye’s political beliefs actually are?

    I’d almost (almost) rather vote for a screaming unionist ex-junkie who is passionate about what she believes in (however wrong and destructive those beliefs may be) than a charisma-free weasel-word uttering empty suit whose political beliefs are completely opaque. At least you know what you are getting with the former.

    Not saying Reeves will necessarily be like that (everyone deserves a chance after all) just that it seems to be representative of a large sector of National’s caucus. Hence their often confused policy making and lack of adherence to the Party’s founding principles ($40m for a boat race, Simon Power’s terrible damage to the justice system, lack of rolling back Labour’s fiscal terrorism and generally retaining the status quo they railed against in opposition etc etc).

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  19. johnwellingtonwells (126 comments) says:

    Tom Jackson. So what do you learn in those jobs that has relevence to being an MP? OK Bellamys and other food outlets needs a complete makeover – so why not install some pokie machines. Or put the catering rights out to the Green Parrot.

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  20. thedavincimode (6,574 comments) says:

    Mr Reeves and his wife lived in London where he was a senior lawyer for a large international law firm and HSBC’s investment banking division.

    If nothing else, he will certainly keep the lunatic water women occupied.

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  21. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    Tom Jackson. So what do you learn in those jobs that has relevence to being an MP? OK Bellamys and other food outlets needs a complete makeover – so why not install some pokie machines. Or put the catering rights out to the Green Parrot.

    When I was younger, I spent my summers working as a wine waiter at an upscale restaurant. I learned more about people from that than by doing any other job I have ever done (and I’ve done a lot of weird jobs). You meet all sorts of people whom you would never otherwise meet and talk to them about all sorts of things that you would otherwise not talk about (I once had a long, interesting and highly entertaining discussion about modern philosophy with a former All Black selector while I was tending bar).

    One time, I learned that a former MP had a major drinking problem and was as bent as all hell. I was not surprised when he was later the centre of a major corruption scandal.

    I have a couple of friends who are cops. You want to learn about the dark side of human nature? Become a cop.

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  22. thedavincimode (6,574 comments) says:

    I’d almost (almost) rather vote for a screaming unionist ex-junkie

    nick, I’ll just put that down to you still being excited about the cricket.

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  23. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    @LAC

    Yes

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  24. johnwellingtonwells (126 comments) says:

    I paid my way through university driving taxis, working in woolstores, laying cables . This does not qualify me to be an MP, although one of these experiences may have helped another past MP. So what from your experience as outlined would make you a suitable National MP? Perhaps you are more suited to Labour

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  25. nickb (3,673 comments) says:

    Haha. Message received dvm.

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  26. David Garrett (6,646 comments) says:

    I dont think there is anything wrong with being passionate…I was passionate about the three strikes law when I agreed to stand for ACT…If I had not managed to get that law in place, the ensuing debacle would have been an umitigated disaster that I ought not under any circumstances have visited upon my family…the fact that I DID manage to get it passed – passion in action if you like – makes what happened (almost) worth it…

    We need more passionate MP’s, and fewer drones who spend their first time sucking up to members of the Executive in the hopes of becoming one…A number of the Ministers in the current administration were brown nosers from 2008…

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  27. thedavincimode (6,574 comments) says:

    I dont think there is anything wrong with being passionate

    Pants down Brown appears to agree with you.

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  28. calendar girl (1,194 comments) says:

    DG: There’s nothing wrong with being keen or enthusiastic about, or committed to, one’s specific political philosophies and objectives. We’re talking here only about use of the hackneyed word “passionate” that is splattered through just about every job application CV you will ever see these days. It’s a contrivance that is seen by advertising agents and PR hacks as a more “sexy” and more convincing expression than common words that are clearer. In practice, those exposed to its use may tend to feel uneasy about the user’s sincerity.

    Mr Reeves’ blurb says: “I am passionate about New Zealand and its politics and absolutely committed to representing the people of Hunua in the next National led government.” Such passion about representing “the people of Hunua” is interesting; after all, he appears to be a carpet-bagger from elsewhere. Perhaps he just meant that he’s committed to becoming an MP. That’s a rather different matter.

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