Tongariro Northern Circuit Day 1

February 10th, 2014 at 11:00 am by David Farrar

Headed up on Waitangi Day to the Whakapapa Village to do the second of the nine – the . Got up there around midday and after a quick lunch at Schnapps Bar at National Park, we started the trail around 1 pm.

We got off to a good start by starting on the right trail. A few other trampers started off on the track you end on, and ended up doing an extra hour or so.

tnc0001

The track starts off well formed, and you can see Ngauruhoe in the distance.

tnc0002

There’s a small amount of bush to go through, but mainly in the open.

tnc0003

Lots of streams to cross, but being summer quite a few of them were dry.

tnc0004

Most of the terrain on the first day is like this.

tnc0005

The signs indicate the 9 km track on the first day takes three hours in good weather and five hours in bad weather. We thought this must be a mistake, but a lot of the track is eroded and in heavy rain would be a nightmare to plod through.

tnc0006

Kerry and David descending to one of the reasonably dry streams. You would drop down into and rise up from over a dozen of them. Nothing at all hard, but does slow you down a bit

tnc0007

Most of the way it was good weather on the Thursday.

tnc0008

You see Mangatepopo Hut from around a km away. Really well located, and some nice sun to be enjoyed from the balcony.

tnc0009

Mt Ngauruhoe as seen from the hut.

tnc0010

 

Inside the hut. It’s pretty basic but decent. Sleeps 20 in two bunkrooms and a couple of cookers and tables in the main area. It’s around 15 minutes from the car park where many people start the Tongariro Crossing.

The first day is pretty easy, and a good warm up. Day two was a lot harder!

Tags: ,

8 Responses to “Tongariro Northern Circuit Day 1”

  1. RRM (9,633 comments) says:

    Cool story dude!

    I wonder if Metiria Turei will be along shortly to write an opinion piece about how ridiculous you are, having fun in your own time…? I’m going to guess not.

    Vote: Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. Longknives (4,677 comments) says:

    Looks like a great hike…
    (That hut looks a little too cosy for my liking though- twenty in two bunkrooms?)

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. tvb (4,240 comments) says:

    Did there whole thing in one day when I was young and fit. Very nice trip. You can be sure Metiria TRurei will not be doing it as Adrienne Winkleman does not design tramping clothes though she does design clothes for tramps.

    Vote: Thumb up 9 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    The hot springs on Tongariro are very kind to sore feet.

    That hut looks a little too cosy for my liking though- twenty in two bunkrooms?)

    I thought everyone knew that “tramping” was really a front for “swinging”. Nature makes some people quite frolicsome apparently.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Dean Papa (775 comments) says:

    twenty in two bunkrooms …

    who farted?

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 1 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. Ed Snack (1,785 comments) says:

    Hey, large capacity bunks are pretty standard in most tramping huts although many of the later ones are going to individual bunks in separate rooms. I just completed the Heaphy and both the Perry Saddle and Heaphy huts (both new in 2012) have multiple bunkrooms with individual bunks (and they’re bloody brilliant huts too, spacious and well designed). However the Mackay hut has two bunkrooms with large platform bunks (plus 4 individual bunks) in two layers. One doesn’t expect too much luxury or privacy when tramping using huts.

    The trouble with the platform bunks can be when it gets crowded and it can get pretty cosy. A few years back I recall setting ourselves up as a family on one large bunk and coming back after making some coffee to find someone plonking themselves down between my wife’s and my own sleeping bags, and then acting all pissy when I suggested on no uncertain terms that they push off and find somewhere else.

    Tramping huts though are rarely a good place for a bit of how’s your father, all too crowded. My ski club though used to have a 4 place bunk that was used from time to time in distinctly non-pairwise coupling.

    Dean, given the usual de-hy diet, probably most of the occupants did. The difference is that some manage to keep it quiet and inside their sleeping bags.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. RF (1,341 comments) says:

    Ed Snack. 2.29pm. In my active youth twin sleeping bags with full length zips were very handy in crowded huts. It was easy to position the zips facing each other. Made it quite exciting in amongst fellow trampers who were otherwise occupied.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. RF (1,341 comments) says:

    Looking forward to the next instalment of the Tongariro Crossing. Great photos.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.