Joyce once voted Social Credit!

March 6th, 2014 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

does 12 questions with the NZ Herald. Some extracts:

No, I haven’t always voted National. I’ve never voted Labour but I’m thinking I might have voted in ’81 for Social Credit and ’84 for the New Zealand Party. 

It’s fine to have voted NZ Party in 1984. But Social Credit in 1981 – oh dear me.

Are older dads different do you think?

You’re assuming I’m old. I’m younger than I look, I assure you. I don’t know about different, but sometimes it’s hard for older dads to keep up. You do get the benefits of experience of course. I’m just glad I am a dad. Should I have done it earlier? Well, that would have been a problem because I hadn’t met my wife.

Heh, indeed. As it happens I was present the day they met! But so were around 200 other people – it was a National caucus party.

Who is the non-National politician you admire most?

It has to be Annette [King]. We’ve had five years together on radio now, talking in the breaks and so on. I volunteered to be her campaign manager for the Labour leadership – I even had a slogan “King for Queen” – but she has yet to take me up on it.

Never too late!

 

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20 Responses to “Joyce once voted Social Credit!”

  1. Elaycee (4,332 comments) says:

    Steven Leonard Joyce (born 7 April 1963)…. He’s not exactly in retirement territory. Thank G*d….. :D

    Voted for Bob Jones / the NZ Party? Yes!
    But Social Credit????? Ouch. Not sure he should have ‘fessed up to that one….
    Had someone spiked his piss?

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  2. s.russell (1,580 comments) says:

    This does not seem so strange to me. In 1981 Labour and National were about equal in the appallingness stakes. Save in a handful of unusual electorates there was no danger that a Socred vote would achieve anything except to send a big message to the main parties to change their ways. And a hung Parliament might actually have produced a better Govt than was provided by Muldoon or would have been provided by Rowling. Might.

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  3. KiwiGreg (3,211 comments) says:

    Pretty sure I voted same way, same years, no doubt for the same reasons. Socred looked different way back then; then they did the deal with Muldoon and they were dead to me!

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  4. tvb (4,242 comments) says:

    He did not vote for Muldoon in 1981 so that is a good thing. And only the mentally challenged voted for him in 1984. Like Joyce I voted for Bob Jones in 1984 and National since. Joyce is mainstream National and is one of my favorite Ministers.

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  5. Pete George (23,296 comments) says:

    There was no party vote in those days so it was voting for an electorate candidate. I may have voted for a Social Credit candidate in ’81, I can’t remember, but I went to a small town meeting they had. And I know I won’t have voted for Warren Cooper – I defaced one of his billboards though. The only time I’ve done that.

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  6. David Garrett (6,723 comments) says:

    PG: Are you sure you should be coming here confessing past sins? The other day it was drunken groping of women (but you knew they consented so it’s alright); now it’s wilful damage of election hoardings..you do realise there is no statute of limitations in this country? (If there was, I might still have a political career…)

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  7. Brian Smaller (4,026 comments) says:

    In 1981 I am guessing you weren’t of voting age DPF. We had a choice between Muldoon and a pack of complete losers. if I remember correctly, nearly a third of the electorate voted for Social Credit but of course, it was wasted as far as getting MPs in the house. Almost everyone I knew voted SC as a protest.

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  8. Pete George (23,296 comments) says:

    There’s a legal statute of limitations isn’t there? But no political statute of limitations. If you’re considered toast someone will find an excuse to use a blowtorch.

    But there’s a precedent that will excuse that misdemeanor. Last election the Greens showed that it’s ok to just bury any accusations. And I wasn’t a party activist, I did it out of personal principle (I didn’t like the incumbent).

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  9. brucehoult (193 comments) says:

    Joyce is four months younger than me. I also voted Social Credit at 18 years of age in my first election. And Bob Jones party in 1984.

    Social Credit’s economic theories including on interest are nuts, but they seemed less harmful than Muldoon or Rowling and they’d just won a by-election in North Shore, which was a big thing in pre-MMP days.

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  10. lolitasbrother (581 comments) says:

    In reply to David Garrett (4,836 comments) says: March 6th, 2014 at 3:48 pmPG:
    he says to Pete George
    ” Are you sure you should be coming here confessing past sins? The other day it was drunken groping of women (but you knew they consented so it’s alright); now it’s wilful damage of election hoardings..you do realise there is no statute of limitations in this country? (If there was, I might still have a political career…) ”

    Can this be true. No limitations on lesser criminal matters. are you sure D. Garrett.
    I know we have a clean slate policy [ of convictions ]after 7 years.
    My conviction for taking out Alliance and Green slogans through various elections disappeared a long time ago.

    I could take out twenty hoardings in a night . Technique and speed not described for obvious reasons.
    It is a minor infringement.
    One determined man, can take out most of the opposition signs.

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  11. Tauhei Notts (1,642 comments) says:

    Interesting to see the people who voted for a Social Credit candidate, like I did, in 1981.
    The upshot of that is that Labour Party people keep raving on about how their candidates got more votes than the National candidates did in that 1981 election. Then they go on to say how unjust that was.
    It is good to see some older people on here who tell it as it was; not how some unscrupulous Teachers’ union people would be teaching their students.
    In this sense I use the word unscrupulous because there is a word in Heineman’s N.Z. dictionary which has two meanings; the first being an unscrupulous person,, the second being the female genitalia. A word that I dare not put in print.
    I recall running a fund raising “do” for the N.Z. Party in 1984. It was a wet tee shirt contest. It was the first time I had ever dealt with the news media, and keeping details away from them was difficult. If I got it wrong they would have been laughing their tits off. Nostalgia is not what it used to be.

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  12. thedavincimode (6,589 comments) says:

    PG

    I think that any statutory limitation only applies from the time the act is uncovered – suggesting it would start know. I suggest you pack your toothbrush.

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  13. MT_Tinman (3,043 comments) says:

    This thread proves completely my oft-stated premis that voters should first have to pass a competency test.

    Anyone who voted for the stupidity of Major Douglas should never be allowed near a polling booth again.

    In 1981 there was only one choice – the party that stood up to the racist, vandalistic scum of the previous few months, the party led by Robert Muldoon.

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  14. tas (596 comments) says:

    You’re going to have to explain what social credit was to young’uns like me.

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  15. ChardonnayGuy (1,183 comments) says:

    He who shall be king hereafter- or almost certainly the next National Party leader, anyway.

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  16. ShawnLH (4,419 comments) says:

    Social Credit was a bizzare movement that was both right and left, big on conspiracy theories involving banks and Jews, and known for it’s one “big idea” which was to print more money to stimulate the economy.

    I don’t think many took it’s policies seriously, but for a few elections they were the beneficiaries of a protest vote against Muldoon and Labour.

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  17. Gulag1917 (795 comments) says:

    Bruce Beetham Social Credit leader and MP promoted proportional representation for many years before it become New Zealand’s voting system.

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  18. Gulag1917 (795 comments) says:

    tas

    What is Social Credit
    In a nut shell Social Credit is a process that allows the wealth of a nation be shared among its people. This wealth can be presented by the creation of new money and dividends (on the basis of real wealth, not debt) Much of the world’s debt has been attributed from the fraudulent process the banks use today. This type of debt can never be paid back, it has caused so much poverty. This poverty is far greater in the third world nations, where hunger and starvation is common. We can reverse this debt by using Social Credit.

    All money created by the banks is created as debt. This has put us in an impossible position as the ability to pay both debt and interest is just not possible. There is never enough money in the world to cover the combined debt with interest as the banks did not create the interest part. This leads to spiral debt. Economies around the world continue to borrow further to cover this missing sum of money over and over again. If they did not borrow more, the money supply would simply run out.
    http://www.bleedingindebt.com/social-credit.html
    [I am not a Social Crediter]

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  19. Gulag1917 (795 comments) says:

    World War 2 use of national[social credit]
    The Curtin Government broke with financial orthodoxy to implement a system of consumer price discounts which eliminated inflation in Australia for five years.

    NZ lLabour Party 1935-38
    “There had developed within it a monetary reform wing, whose most articulate spokesman was John A. Lee; and as early as 1932 and 1933 there were some differences on the relative merits of borrowing or the issue of credit to finance recovery. Savage’s own views on financial questions were vague and many of his public statements would seem to support an approach akin to Social Credit. Yet this must be assessed in the context of the time, for Labour agreed with the Social Credit contention that there was a lack of purchasing power in the economy.”
    http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/1966/savage-right-hon-michael-joseph

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  20. Johnboy (15,537 comments) says:

    How can anyone born in 1963 be fatter than me (1949).

    Oh I had to work hard for my living! :)

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