Everest Base Camp Day 6

April 13th, 2014 at 4:00 pm by David Farrar

EBC0020

Oh yes, it also snowed overnight which made it really cold. You see below some of the left over snow.

EBC0021

The trek ahead is to follow the path until we end up next to the river and then climb over the pass.

EBC0022

A memorial at the site where over 20 Sherpas and trekkers died in an avalanche.

EBC0023

A snowcock.

EBC0024

Around halfway through the first part of the trek.

EBC0025

We’re definitely at the snow level as you’ll soon see.

EBC0026

These steps up were very cool – nothing holding them together – just rocks placed on top of each other. Quite a climb.

EBC0027

The top of the river as we cross it.

EBC0028

Looks pretty cold eh!

EBC0029

The first of the Gokyo lakes.

EBC0030

A male and female duck – the only inhabitants of the lake.

EBC0031

The second Gokyo lake – frozen over.

EBC0032

And the large third Gokyo lake.

EBC0033

And finally Gokyo itself. Yay. Again I had headaches and altitude sickness and found it tough going. It was pretty cold the final stretch also – had on three layers of merino up top and a jacket as well. The wind bites into your face and reminds you how high up you are – 4,800 metres which is twice the height of many NZ mountains.

EBC0034

It started snowing soon after we got here, as you can see on the poor yaks.

Thankfully tomorrow is an acclimatisation day so my headaches should reduce or go away, and the day after tomorrow we actually end up 100 metres or so lower.

However the snow means that the pass over to may become too dangerous. One day is an eight hour trek between lodges with no shelters inbetween. The height gets up to 5,300 metres but the real danger is the snow means you don’t know if you are on the trail or not, as there are no markers or signs.

We’ll decide tomorrow night probably whether to try going over the pass, or to head back down and try going up the main route to Everest Base Camp.

Tags: , , ,

10 Responses to “Everest Base Camp Day 6”

  1. UrbanNeocolonialist (289 comments) says:

    Wow, doing it the hard way by the sound of it. Main route is a much more gradual rise to give better chance for acclimatisation – but probably nice being away from the crowds. It really does stop being fun over 5000m – just cold, breathless and feeling like you have the flu.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  2. Pete George (23,591 comments) says:

    4,800 metres which is twice the height of many NZ mountains.

    Mt Taranaki 1,966 metres
    Mr Tongariro 1,978 metres
    Mount Ngauruhoe 2,291 metres
    Mt Ruapehu – Tahurangi (2,797 m), Te Heuheu (2,755 m) and Paretetaitonga (2,751 m)
    Mt Aspiring 3,033 metres (highest in NZ outside the Mt Cook area)
    Mt Cook 3,724 metres

    So yeah, it’s getting up a bit.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  3. Grizz (605 comments) says:

    David, On your way up to Gyoko, have you noticed that you keep looking at the same mountain in the distance. Have you realised that it is Cho Oyu, the 6th highest mountain in the world. It is in the back drop of most of your pictures. I do hope you climb Gokyo Ri. The view is spectacular.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  4. JMS (331 comments) says:

    Mt Taranaki 1,966 metres

    PG, that’s the height of Fantham’s Peak, the small cone on the south side of Mt Egmont.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  5. Pete George (23,591 comments) says:

    Yeah, I copied the wrong height, Mt Taranaki is 2518 metres so just over half DPF’s height.

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  6. RRM (9,933 comments) says:

    Spectacular photos! Enjoy your rest day… contemplate how hard those men must have been who not only walked around up there, but did actual hard work building stone masonry buildings :-P

    (I know I’ve been exhausted on many a NZ DoC walking track… always marvelled at the fitness of those who not only got there, but then got a shovel out and built a smooth gravelled walking track.)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  7. Albert_Ross (298 comments) says:

    Don’t feel sorry for those “poor yaks”. Marvel instead at how efficiently insulated they are. The fact that there’s unmelted snow on their backs shows how little of their body heat is getting out.

    Hope you feel better as you get used to the altitude and please don’t take silly chances

    Vote: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  8. Chuck Bird (4,895 comments) says:

    The highest I have been is 2797 and I know the affect of altitude at that height when you have to exert oneself. You are at double that height. Well done.

    Vote: Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  9. chuk (40 comments) says:

    Thanks for the great piccies and comments David. I will never get to where you are now so it’s a treat to be able to follow your progress.

    I hope your acclimatisation day does the trick as far as the headaches are concerned.

    No doubt the pace is pretty slow at 4,800 metres, even for the guides, or are they still treating it like a country stroll? It will be interesting to see whether the effort is noticeably easier after the acclimatisation day.

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote
  10. thor42 (971 comments) says:

    GREAT pics DPF! Great commentary too!

    Those snowcock birds look quite tame and cuddly-looking. Are they tame enough to feed out of your hand, I wonder? Very nice birds!

    Take care. I hope the altitude-sickness goes away really soon. You must be getting “fit as” by now….. :)

    Vote: Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0 You need to be logged in to vote