General Debate 29 April 2014

April 29th, 2014 at 8:00 am by Kokila Patel
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150 Responses to “General Debate 29 April 2014”

  1. jp_1983 (213 comments) says:

    So who went to hear David Parker say how he will be the ‘saviour’ of New Zealand this morning?

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  2. duggledog (1,558 comments) says:

    David Cunliffe basically admits on National Radio that Labour will f*** with the exchange rate forcing prices up I quote ‘Hey you might have to pay more for your LCD TV but the prices are coming down anyway’. Yeah what about petrol?

    Poor people will get f***ed again by Labour. Why anyone earning the average wage would vote for these clowns is beyond me

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  3. dirty harry (489 comments) says:

    Donald Sterling eh…funny as..

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  4. Scott Chris (6,139 comments) says:

    What it takes to be a Real Conservative:

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/9986758/Marry-him-or-dump-him-church

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  5. Tauhei Notts (1,714 comments) says:

    Sir Robert Jones writes so beautifully in this morning’s New Zealand Herald.
    It reminds me of one of the key planks of the N.Z. Party thirty years ago; we don’t need the military! And, over the past 30 years, where have we needed the military.

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  6. redqueen (563 comments) says:

    Yet more entertainment from the Herald…

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11245846

    So ‘critics’ can remain anonymous, but say ‘the system isn’t working’? Did anyone bother to think that the Arms Act specifically, and intentionally, replaced registering firearms with licensing firearms users. Given how little gun crime we actually have in NZ, it’s pretty impressive (particularlly with our reasonably liberal firearms laws). This is just ‘shock, horror’ nonsense, but it’s propogated as front-page news by the Herald…

    Seriously, what alternative do they have, other than the perpetual socialist cry of ‘let’s just have another register’? Forget the compliance costs, whether it will actually hinder crime, whether it will help the police. No, let’s just complain about the system working as designed…

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  7. dirty harry (489 comments) says:

    Had an argument with a tool from Z fuel yesterday , asked him why the price of fuel never comes down , apart from spluttering and repeating the company jargon over and over, he reckoned they only make 4 cents net per litre.

    Bollocks..91 is 2.17 a litre , take out all the govt taxes ( approx half ) and you’re trying to tell me you still only net 4c a litre.

    Liar…

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  8. Left Right and Centre (2,979 comments) says:

    Truck driver shortage according to Auckland Chamber of Commerce.

    Answer: Immigration !! Any excuse to add to the Star Wars diversity of Auckland . . . COOL !!!!!!!!!

    Just what you want – more road users who don’t speak a word of fucking English and drive as badly as they look.

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  9. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    An animal and a thug: http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/9986637/Prisoner-wants-his-very-special-car-back

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  10. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    Parker reforming the economy via Reserve Bank is another act of desperation in an attempt to gain traction, being full of flaws. This goon could not run a small enterprise efficiently, went to the wall. His only success is wooing a stroke ridden friend’s wife . . . another left-wing losers!

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  11. J Bloggs (241 comments) says:

    redqueen: I don’t think you need another register. How about all firearms dealers submit a monthly list of purchasers licence numbers (and maybe number of firearms purchased in the transaction) to the police, who can then put it in a database. If a given licence number comes up more than a certian number of times a year, then it gets flagged for closer police investigation.

    The Firearms dealers are required to get that information anyway, all that needs to be done is to forward it on to the police.

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  12. Paulus (2,627 comments) says:

    Just heard Parker on Morning Report.
    Am staggered to hear that he really doesn’t have clue how to take New Zealand forward.
    He could not properly answer Guyon Espiner’ friendly questions.
    What a fiasco.
    He is a classic mumbler who does not know what he is talking about – other than we are going to stuff you all for our socialist programme.
    And with our Greenpeace partners we will save the snails.

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  13. EAD (1,087 comments) says:

    Mongrel Mob killer of a young Polynesian farther to be immortalised in photo exhibition:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11245880

    So let me get this straight:

    Maori murderer made a martyr? Thats fine.

    Police publish the ethnicity of a cold-blooded murder to help identify them? Thats racist.

    Maori Political Party? How noble, deserve a spot in the Government, instructed to re-write the constitution.

    Spoof Pakeha Party set up? Racist, fascist, full of hatred.

    Maori person proud of their race? Perfectly fine.

    White person proud of their race? Hate crime call the race police immediately.

    Maori person complaining that Maori people should be given preferential treatment for jobs because their ancestors got here first? Yes thats OK.

    Pakeha/Asian person stating that all people should be judged on their abilities and not skin colour? No no that’s a hate crime how dare you!

    As you can see the racist system we now live under is deeply unfair and divisive and morally repulsive and breeds hatred with every new law and diktat and special treatment. Instead of a colour blind country we now have the opposite and one where white people are being set up as the targets of hate. We now suffer under a system that is creating the conditions for civil strife and unrest leading to a tragedy, its time we put a stop to this madness.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11244832

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  14. dirty harry (489 comments) says:

    Ryan Tandy dead…

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/league/9986790/Ryan-Tandys-sad-end-to-a-troubled-career

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  15. redqueen (563 comments) says:

    @ J Bloggs

    And the private sellers? What about ancillary equipment? You won’t, realistically, be able to police this without significantly more resources and, even then, it simply may be impossible. So what you’ll end up with is the same doosh going around buy private firearms, with even less rules than at gun stores, and the Police won’t be able to stop it. Seriously, one twat and the MSM’s declared the system is flawed. It’s just there is no real practical alternative (without dramatic compliance costs and, even then, limited potential reduction in such cases).

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  16. kowtow (8,487 comments) says:

    redqueen

    The question the Herald did not pose was ,How did the crook have a firearms licence in the first place?Seems like a pretty heavy duty crook,what with the firearms and drugs charges.

    Police need to look at their own systems to see how they are failing the public and indeed their own members who may have to face weapons sourced by that guy.

    Resources…….yep they’re out there heavily policing the 4 kph and “domestic ” abuse cases but this guy can run a gun industry under their noses.

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  17. prosper (167 comments) says:

    If the fuel station is franchised they get 4cents a litre. Z, Caltex Franchisors get the rest of the mark up.

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  18. redqueen (563 comments) says:

    @ kowtow

    Exactly. This article simply took the view that the lack of registration was the problem. There are potential issues with people misusing the system, but that is something the licensing system is supposed to prevent (rather than detect/correct). But it’s easier for journos, I guess, to be sensationalist and propose yet more paperwork.

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  19. kowtow (8,487 comments) says:

    Britain,source of our ancient freedoms ,has become a police state, in the cause of human rights!

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2614834/Arrested-quoting-Winston-Churchill-European-election-candidate-accused-religious-racial-harassment-repeats-wartime-prime-ministers-words-Islam-campaign-speech.html

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  20. Alan (1,087 comments) says:

    Labours VSR policy is a farce.

    I’m sorry, but even I can’t vote for Labour now.

    I’m stunned at how bad this is.

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  21. J Bloggs (241 comments) says:

    redqueen: Every system has flaws that can be exploited. Yes, if you go and buy all your weapons off private sellers, you’ll get around it. But that happens now anyway. What I suggested would have caught out this particular offender (and maybe others) earlier. It’s not THE answer, but it patches a hole, and it’s a relatively easy one to implement.

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  22. J Bloggs (241 comments) says:

    kowotw: He’s a crook, NOW. There is nothing in that article to suggest that he had a criminal record at the time he obtained the firearms license, or even when he purchased the weapons.

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  23. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    we don’t need the military! And, over the past 30 years, where have we needed the military.

    The military is there in case. Because when it hits the fan nothing can replace it. Just because the public or the media don’t see threats does not mean threats don’t exist. Just because politicians pretend threats don’t exist does not mean threats don’t exist.

    The military depends on institutional knowledge. When we lost the fighters for example we didn’t lose the current generation of planes, we lost all the institutional knowledge gained since WWI in operating strike aircraft in combat. From strategy to tactics to mission planning to ground servicing to avionics to weapons maintenance, we lost thousands of myriad trades and services that contributed to delivering the hardware over the target when, where and as needed, time after time after time until mission accomplished; we lost all of that. We also lost the ability to train our ground forces and our navy in coordinating their operations with air-strike forces and now the safety of our ground forces is totally dependant on our allies, who may or may or not come through, time after time after time.

    That’s just one example of what we lost. When you see the troops out in Waiouru on route marches etc; they’re not doing it for fun, they’re rehearsing. That’s what the military does, it rehearses and rehearses and rehearses so that when real combat occurs everything is muscle memory and the machine reacts as per training. If you don’t continue that practice then you lose all the institutional knowledge because everyone of age goes and joins allied forces so they cannot then be recalled and join together and operate as a cohesive unit like a single organism in case of threat to NZ, because for years they’ve been operating separately and it would take years to reconstitute them. And if you send an army of separate uncoordinated units into combat you’re going to lose them straight away.

    When Hitler failed to encircle the BEF at Dunkirk, he lost the war. Why? Because he failed to capture not the privates but the sergeants, the lieutenants, the captains, majors, colonels and most critically, the generals. The UK lost all their equipment. When they did the commando raid on the Bruneval radar station in 1942, the commandos were issued with all 12 tommy guns in Britain at the time and part of their orders were to bring them all back, that’s how bereft of equipment they were. But they were nevertheless able to rebuild themselves only because they had retained all the institutional knowledge. That illustrates how mission-critical it is to maintain it. That’s why we need to maintain armed forces during peacetime.

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  24. martinh (1,257 comments) says:

    Just read that Labours new policy requires the govt to use the tool, not the rbnz.
    Seems a fatal flaw in it to me

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  25. Ross12 (1,428 comments) says:

    Alan — Have you read about Labour’s way of getting more housing land ? It should put you off even more.

    http://www.whaleoil.co.nz/2014/04/labours-assault-private-property/

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  26. J Bloggs (241 comments) says:

    Reid: EXACTLY!!!!!!! And unfortunately, that’s why we are not going to see a return of the RNZAF’s combat wing until the government gets a thundering great kick up the arse – it’s not just the cost of new aircraft, its the cost of regaining all that knowledge that makes the replacement prohibitive to the government.

    The military is an insurance policy. And the removal of the strike wing seriously reduced our cover

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  27. martinh (1,257 comments) says:

    Listening to Parker on natradio, Kathryn Ryans knows her stuff

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  28. RRM (9,924 comments) says:

    Been releasing more poisonous gas than a Nazi this morning. Glad I don’t have to go to any meetings today… :-(

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  29. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    the removal of the strike wing seriously reduced our cover

    One of the reasons why I’ve always said Hulun is a traitor to the country JB. She knew exactly what we were losing, that’s why she did it. I remember when it was happening. The only two people writing letters to the Herald pointing all this out were a guy called Raymond Ching and myself. All the rest of the letters on this topic were referring to Tauhei and Jones’ perspective. The public don’t get it. I can’t recall one journalist who got it but I may be wrong.

    What’s annoying is that what I said isn’t rocket science, it’s obvious. And why the heck are people living in some deluded fantasy land whereby they hallucinate conflict is a thing of the past, when the 20th century was the most bloody century in history and so far this one is shaping up to be even worse? Don’t they know anything? Are they such profound morons that they’re incapable of telling the difference between historical facts and a fiction they have invented in their own heads because that’s what they want to believe so they only read facts that fit their fantasy? Apparently, they are.

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  30. Keeping Stock (10,342 comments) says:

    We had a religious experience on Sunday in Adelaide; of the AFL variety. Those folk know how to support their team.

    And the new-look Adelaide Oval is a sensational modern stadium. There were 47,007 punters at the match, and even though Geelong lost, our group had a fantastic day out.

    http://keepingstock.blogspot.com.au/2014/04/a-religious-experience.html?m=0

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  31. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Some measures to control the Reserve Bank have been announced this morning by the moron David Parker, which would lead to a big hike in inflation and overall cost of living. Ah, the socialist imbeciles!

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  32. RRM (9,924 comments) says:

    J Bloggs – the A-4s of the “combat wing of the RNZAF” as it was, would have merely provided a fun turkey shooting opportunity, to any enemy powerful enough to land an invasion force in New Zealand.

    Even if we had bought the F-16s, we would never have had the balls OR the oppportunity to make use of them like Israel has with theirs.

    The Texan IIs are a far more sensible acquisition than a token jet fighter force would have been – turbine trainers that can also drop hardware on fuckers with guns in the jungle if needed.

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  33. Don the Kiwi (1,757 comments) says:

    RRM.

    What’s a Texan 11 ?

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  34. hj (7,023 comments) says:

    Bob Jones: “we don’t need a military”- just let people come in. Keep property prices high and wages low.

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  35. dime (9,972 comments) says:

    “A Labour-led government will require the Reserve Bank to use changes to the rate of people’s compulsory KiwiSaver contributions rather than interest rates to control inflation while taking pressure off the over-valued kiwi dollar.”

    Dime asked this question the other day.

    Can someone tell me why this wont work? Im sure it wont but not sure why. Its been many moons since my last economics class!

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  36. Duxton (651 comments) says:

    150th anniversary of the battle of Gate Pa today….

    Hopefully we won’t see James Belich’s ridiculous interpretation of the battle held up as being definitive – although I wouldn’t hold my breath.

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  37. J Bloggs (241 comments) says:

    Reid: There is an unfortunate number of people in NZ who have never experienced any of the world outside of our little isolated bubble at the bottom of the globe. These people don’t realise they are living in a fool’s paradise, and so get all swept up in the rhetoric (despite turning out for ANZAC day every year).

    An example: I know of one primary school teacher who had grown up in an Auckland suburb. They went to the local primary, the local intermediate, and the local high school. They trained at Auckland teachers college, then went straight to teaching back at the same local primary school they’d attended as a child. What does this person know about the world, other than what they’ve absorbed through the media?

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  38. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    Keeping an air force would be rational if New Zealand was a sovereign nation. It isn’t. The NZ state is part of five eyes, the security arrangement involving US, UK, Canada, Australia, and NZ. This arrangement serves the interests of an empire which operates like a psychotic gangster hell-bent on extending it’s sphere of influence without regard for the death and suffering it causes in the process.

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  39. J Bloggs (241 comments) says:

    RRM: Of course the A-4’s were obsolete. But even if they’d been ditched, and the F-16’s not taken up, even then, if they’d kept the Aermacchi’s operational, they would have kept that institutional knowledge base (both in the RNZAF, and in joint ops with the army and navy) active as a cadre that could have been built upon at a later date.

    But it’s too late now, the base has gone, and it won’t be cheap or easy to get back

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  40. Brian Smaller (4,023 comments) says:

    Mongrel Mob killer of a young Polynesian farther to be immortalised in photo exhibition:

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11245880

    Young Polynesian father etc etc etc…who should have chosen his friends with more care. He hung out with gang members and got killed,. No sympathy for him or his family.

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  41. martinh (1,257 comments) says:

    Dime
    Inflation can be caused by external prices, so increasing saving rates wont decrease that inflation

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  42. EAD (1,087 comments) says:

    @ Reid 9.21

    You and I are in agreement that we are living in a very unique time in history when the 43 years of debt insanities will morph into a series of death insanities. As soon as the first dollar was conjured up out of thin air and lent at interest, the die was cast. Exponential growth for monetary systems don’t tend to last too long!

    Have you read Neill Strauss’s book “4th turning” which is about how major societal change happens approx every 80 years – well worth a read. Unfortunately we’ll get the usual suspects come along and shout “conspiracy theorists” as if by shouting loud they can drown out the laws of mathematics and physics and human history which despite repeating itself over and over again, there will always be people who will never believe simply because they cannot see things in a dynamic structure. They can only see the world in a linear fashion.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-04-28/crash-inevitable-spiral-vortex-debt-and-corruption

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  43. ShawnLH (5,124 comments) says:

    The sad irony is that Labour’s monetary policy will hurt the poor and working class the most, as they can least afford to cope with price rises caused by inflation.

    The economy is already growing, manufacturing is growing, so there is no need for Labour’s monetary foolishness.

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  44. Weihana (4,537 comments) says:

    EAD (332 comments) says:
    April 29th, 2014 at 8:39 am

    As you can see the racist system we now live under is deeply unfair and divisive and morally repulsive and breeds hatred with every new law and diktat and special treatment. Instead of a colour blind country we now have the opposite and one where white people are being set up as the targets of hate. We now suffer under a system that is creating the conditions for civil strife and unrest leading to a tragedy, its time we put a stop to this madness.

    “Black racism is the biggest problem facing the world” – Peter Griffin

    :)

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  45. kowtow (8,487 comments) says:

    J Bloggs

    Nope ,I know that. But he’ll have been dodgy at the very least.

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  46. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    This arrangement serves the interests of an empire which operates like a psychotic gangster

    UT as you know I both perceive and agree with this perspective. My view however is that there are many people within the military command and intelligence structures of all five nations who also know what we know and they act as the most powerful moderating force that we have available. It’s better to be inside the tent, in other words.

    Some of them have been fired in recent years for these views and as you know, the reason why they’re issuing APCs to local law enforcement agencies is because they can’t trust the military to fire on their own people. When the false flags fall again and martial law ensues, a lot of the military are going to remember the part of their oath about the domestic enemies and react accordingly.

    It’s not going to work of course, that’s been predicted. But I’d rather go down fighting than meekly walk to the chambers, when the day comes when we’re all presented with one or other of those two choices and there is no third.

    Have you read Neill Strauss’s book “4th turning” which is about how major societal change happens approx every 80 years – well worth a read.

    Yes I have EAD, it’s a very interesting observation isn’t it. Two of my brothers are in the hero generation. I’m a gypsy.

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  47. Weihana (4,537 comments) says:

    EAD (333 comments) says:
    April 29th, 2014 at 9:48 am

    Exponential growth for monetary systems don’t tend to last too long!

    Why not? If the economy grows at an exponential rate then the money supply should also grow at an exponential rate otherwise you get deflation.

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  48. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    From the Onion:

    U.S. Flag Recalled After Causing 143 Million Deaths

    WASHINGTON—Citing a series of fatal malfunctions dating back to 1777, flag manufacturer Annin & Company announced Monday that it would be recalling all makes and models of its popular American flag from both foreign and domestic markets.
    Representatives from the nation’s leading flag producer claimed that as many as 143 million deaths in the past two centuries can be attributed directly to the faulty U.S. models, which have been utilized extensively since the 18th century in sectors as diverse as government, the military, and public education.
    “It has come to our attention that, due to the inherent risks and hazards it poses, the American flag is simply unfit for general use,” said Annin & Company president Ronald Burman, who confirmed that the number of flag-related deaths had noticeably spiked since 2003. “I would like to strongly urge all U.S. citizens: If you have an American flag hanging in your home or place of business, please discontinue using it immediately.”

    http://www.theonion.com/articles/us-flag-recalled-after-causing-143-million-deaths,17248/

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  49. stephieboy (3,091 comments) says:

    Reid , it could be argued that the miracle of Dunkirk was a turning but the real turning point came with Hitler ‘s decision to stage and fight a two front war with the invasion of Russa and the declaration of War against the US with the bombing of Pearl Harbour.
    BTW after the initial Nazi onslaught the Russians, like Dunkirk, lost hugely in terms of commissioned officers, soldiers as well as military equipment etc,etc.
    Strike arm .? Given the enourmas outlay Australia has expended on it’s new strike arm , $12 billion, how do you propse we fund ours.? Where will the say $ 3 billion come from exactly.? The facts are modern day stile arms are prohibitively expensive.to acquire and maintain.

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  50. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    Why not? If the economy grows at an exponential rate then the money supply should also grow at an exponential rate otherwise you get deflation.

    Short answer:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlODOk_iyXg

    Longer more detailed explanation:

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  51. mister nui (1,028 comments) says:

    Anybody else having problems with Telecon’s Auckland 3G network? We are across multiple devices. Keeps dropping the connection and can only be restored by a reboot.

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  52. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    Catholic Religious Education teacher stabbed to death in front of her class in Britain

    A 15-year-old boy was being questioned by police today after allegedly stabbing his ‘caring and kind’ teacher Ann Maguire to death in front of her pupils.

    The boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, was held after Mrs Maguire was repeatedly stabbed in the neck in front of a class of teenagers at the Corpus Christie Catholic College school in Leeds.

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  53. stephieboy (3,091 comments) says:

    UT, so the US was responsible for the military and war casualties and deaths in WWI and IIi. .?
    The toll in both wars would approach 143 million I would think.

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  54. NoCash (258 comments) says:

    @Dime

    In a short term controlling the compulsory saving rate via KiwiSaver would work to a degree. However, not everyone puts all savings into KiwiSaver and any increases could be offset by people who also have savings and investments outside of KiwiSaver.

    I would hazard a guess that people who would be greatly affected by the KiwiSaver rate would be the ones already with the least discretionary spending power, hence have less influence on price inflation from a demand side perspective.

    Using interest rates is the most neutral method to encourage saving and discourage borrowing and vice versa, and in turn to control the money supply.

    Relying on KiwiSaver rate will also mean more work for accountants and would have far less effect on non-salary earners.

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  55. ShawnLH (5,124 comments) says:

    Stephie,

    “UT, so the US was responsible for the military and war casualties and deaths in WWI and II”

    I don’t think UT realises that the Onion is a satire web site. The again, his track record in discerning fantasy from reality is not particularly good.

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  56. lilman (959 comments) says:

    So sorry but as the debate on fuel goes its 3 cents a litre and 4 depending on the payment schedule that is agreed between the owner or lessee of the station.
    Most are 4 cents,but a few are 3 with a smaller share of the Net profit from shop and other product sales going to the oil company or franchise owners.
    Hope that helps.

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  57. dime (9,972 comments) says:

    “Using interest rates is the most neutral method to encourage saving and discourage borrowing and vice versa, and in turn to control the money supply.”

    cheers for your response.

    the issue i have is where we are at now. the mortgages people have are insane. the amount of money the banks get through a rate rise is bullshit. its too much money leaving the economy. theres gotta be another way.

    but you raise a good point – it will effect the poor the most. thats the fuckers justification for cutting their tax even more ( or upping the hand outs) and yanking my tax. assholes.

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  58. minus (197 comments) says:

    Testing legal highs on animals to determine safety.
    Seems that is what they have been doing, since July last year.
    “Vomiting blood” and “… it lasted for two months and he was still seeing and hearing things that weren’t there”
    indicate some definite problems, but it is a pity no one has kept any usable data.

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  59. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    My view however is that there are many people within the military command and intelligence structures of all five nations who also know what we know and they act as the most powerful moderating force that we have available.

    There’s a meme from the anti-masonic movement in which the colours black and blue symbolise the power structure of the masons. At the top are the black degrees of freemasonry, in which the members are cognizant of their evil purpose, and below are the blue degrees, in which the members intend to serve the public good but are actually under the power of those who serve evil.

    No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other.
    Matthew 6:24

    The empire is nothing without the military and it’s hierarchy.

    It’s better to be inside the tent, in other words.

    Interesting choice of phrase. Several popular artists from the music industry refer to rain as an allusion to the riches which come with selling out to the machine. In contrast, rain in due season was one of the blessings of the Mosaic covenant.

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  60. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Utter nonsense from a socialist moron: http://news.msn.co.nz/nationalnews/8836652/labours-monetary-policy-snake-oil

    The plan would be to raise the current three per cent KiwiSaver rate by 0.5 per cent a year to nine per cent, although that would depend on wages increasing so people weren’t any worse off.

    Mr Parker says that for someone on $50,000 a year, a 0.5 per cent increase would be $250 a year.

    “They would keep the money in their retirement savings, instead of paying it to a foreign bank in higher interest rates,” he told reporters after announcing the policy in Auckland. “At the moment mortgage holders bear all the pain, wealthy people don’t.”

    Mr Parker says increased savings would bring down the exchange rate, which is hurting exporters because their products cost more on international markets.

    “Our currency is falsely high, interest rates are going up, mortgages are going up – the current system is wrong,” he said.

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  61. kowtow (8,487 comments) says:

    Minus hahaha.

    The Campbell show last night confirmed the users are all ferals.

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  62. WineOh (630 comments) says:

    Regarding fuel stations- you’re both right but doesn’t tell the full story.

    A fuel retailer or service station operator’s income is derived from multiple sources-
    1. A differential between the gross sale price received and the price charged for the fuel by the distributor
    2. Site allowances for additional rebates, rent rebates or “cents per litre” determined based on how viable an individual site is
    3. Retail revenue for shop sales

    Out of the price you pay at the pump, it’s true the _retailer_ may only receive $0.04-$0.07 per litre. But its actually worse than this, as a significant portion of sales are made by credit card rather than EFTPOS and cash. These will cost somewhere between 1.0%-1.5% of the gross ticket sale. Say 1.25% of $2.17 per litre = $0.027 per litre – so half of the retailers chunk is swallowed up by the credit card company right away. Obviously this gets worse for the retailer as prices increase, as the revenue they receive stays the same if they ump the same number of litres, but the cost of service goes up.

    If a site is marginal based on the volumes they pump but important for an access perspective, the wholesaler will allocate a higher portion of the fuel take back to the retailer to make the business viable. This may take the form of additional cents per litre, a fixed dollar sum of rent rebate, additional allowances as contributions towards signage etc.

    The shop sales are a very significant part of gross profit for a petrol station- the gross margin they make on a couple snacks and a coke may be more than they get from the $100 of fuel. However around 40-50% of the retail sales through a petrol station are for cigarettes, and because of high government taxes they don’t make big dollars on these. On a typical site the petrol margins cover the rent, and the shop sales cover the staff and some profit. This is why you always get asked about the overpriced snack specials at the counter.

    I’m not certain how it works specifically with Z, but with other fuel outlets that I have dealt with the retailer also has almost no control of their fuel revenue- they are dictated as to what their sale price is, what they pay for it, when the fuel gets delivered etc. Depending on the supply agreement this may mean huge cashflow swings- if a retailer receives a big dump of fuel at $x, but then market prices shift down by $0.05 overnight they can end up paying customers to take fuel away from them. Of course they get double when the prices go the other way.

    A significant number of petrol retailers are barely breaking even if they are not in high volume locations. These sweet spots get given to proven performers, while others in the suburban and provincial areas are “encouraged” to take on multiple sites in order to generate enough profit for the operator to live on.

    The other side of the coin – where the rest of the “Z” margin goes is not quite as transparent. As an example, Z owns around 17% of Refinery NZ (New Zealand’s only oil refinery). Take away the GST and the government fuel levies/taxes and what’s left gets divided between the cost of extracting the oil, the refining costs, the distribution costs, retailer’s margin, and the wholesaler’s margin. The wholesaler holds virtually ALL the cards when negotiating with the retailer, long term supply agreements etc. I’ve seen some serious bully-boy tactics, forcing operators to buy land & buildings, pumps and tanks, in exchange for increases in retail margin – divesting the wholesaler’s risk on the site. However who really wants to own a petrol station site if it’s not viable for pumping gas? And the risks around ground seepage environmental side of things, conversion costs to turn it into something else? Just look at the number of derelict old petrol sites around the country.

    Anyway, the short version is- don’t harass the petrol retailer, they aren’t the problem and work long hours for very skinny margins. It’s the wholesaler/oil company that holds the purse strings.

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  63. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    I don’t think UT realises that the Onion is a satire web site. The again, his track record in discerning fantasy from reality is not particularly good.

    Who is selling fantasy: Paul, when he says that all scripture is inspired, or the church when it rejects non-canonical texts?

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  64. kowtow (8,487 comments) says:

    If they want to encourage savings then take the fricken tax off it.

    No chance of that.

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  65. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    The Campbell show last night confirmed the users are all ferals.

    Unfortunately all those ferals and losers are bludgers living on benefits paid by our taxes.

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  66. Paulus (2,627 comments) says:

    Have difficulty in the Tauranga Council giving away Ratepayers money to celebrate the Battle of Gate Pah in Tauranga.
    They are immortalising the Maori who ran away after the battle, and from the obvious history once again has been distorted, This is being portrayed primarily by the young school children who have been practicing their parts for this so called celebration for weeks.
    Big Dinner last night paid for by only some – the rest are part of the Council and Taxpayers gravy train.

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  67. Fletch (6,390 comments) says:

    The proof is in: the absence of fathers harms the well-being of children.

    The Proof Is in: Father Absence Harms Child Well-Being

    Despite reams of data that NFI has compiled in six editions of Father Facts (the most comprehensive collection of data available on the consequences of father absence and the benefits of father involvement for children), the recognition among people across the political spectrum of the need to combat father absence, and the commitment of many private and public funders to addressing this problem, there are still some scholars and members of the public who are not convinced that dads are important to children. Many believe that family structure doesn’t really matter, as long as children are cared for and loved by someone, anyone. One valid reason for the skepticism among scholars, at least, is the lack of rigorous analytical methods employed in much of the research.

    Late last year, researchers Sara McLanahan, Laura Tach, and Daniel Schneider stepped into the fray with their review of nearly 50 studies that employed innovative, rigorous designs to examine the causal effects of father absence. Published in the Annual Review of Sociology, “The Causal Effects of Father Absence” examined studies that focused on the relationship between father absence and four outcomes for children: educational attainment, mental health, relationship formation and stability, and labor force success. Although these studies varied in the use of analytical approaches and found different effect sizes, they prove beyond reproach that father absence causes poor outcomes for children in each of these areas.

    This is a critical distinction. The old adage, “correlation does not imply causation,” does not apply to the effects of father absence on children. In other words, for many of our most intractable social ills affecting children, father absence is to blame.

    Furthermore, as an anthropologist, what impressed me about the review is not only its inclusion of studies that employed a variety of analytical approaches methods; it also included studies from nine countries, mostly developed countries (including the U.S.) but also developing countries. Consequently, this cross-cultural analysis of research lends strength and credibility to the conclusion about the devastating effects of father absence. It also supports other recent research on the importance of family structure to child well being, which I wrote about in a recent post on this blog. Father absence isn’t just a U.S. problem — it’s a human problem.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/christopher-a-brown/the-proof-is-infather-abs_b_4941353.html

    Studies like this should have been looked at here in New Zealand and overseas before any decision on adopting gay marriage was made; and the adopting of children by gay parents.

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  68. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    …the absence of fathers harms the well-being of children.

    Which is precisely why society has been engineered the way it has.

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  69. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Fletch, we pay women not to have fathers for their children. The benefit is not the biggest cost of that policy. That is the cheapest part.

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  70. ShawnLH (5,124 comments) says:

    The constant playing of 70’s Pop/Disco elevator music in malls and supermarkets is clear proof of the existence of Satan.

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  71. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    The 70′s Pop/Disco elevator music constantly played in malls and supermarkets is clear proof of the existence of Satan.:)

    ShawnLH at last presents some solid evidence for the supernatural :)

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  72. lilman (959 comments) says:

    WineOH -very good post agree 100 percent.

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  73. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    Arrested for quoting Winston Churchill: European election candidate accused of religious and racial harassment after he repeats wartime prime minister’s words on Islam during campaign speech

    The passage from the book, written by the wartime Prime Minister and first published in 1899, focuses on Churchill’s observations about Islam while serving during the Anglo-Egyptian reconquest of the Sudan.

    Mr Weston told his audience: ‘Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live.

    ‘Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the faith: all know how to die but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it.

    ‘No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proselytizing faith.’

    Police officers arrested Mr Weston, mid-speech, for failing to comply with their request to move on under the powers of a dispersal order made against him.

    He was further arrested on suspicion of religious or racial harrassment.

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  74. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    The constant playing of 70′s Pop/Disco elevator music in malls and supermarkets is clear proof of the existence of Satan.

    Funnily enough you’re inadvertently onto something there Shawn, even if you didn’t intend to be. Even a stopped clock is right twice a day.

    But seriously, Satan was a musical specialist. http://www.turnbacktogod.com/lucifer-angel-of-music/

    This possibly explains why the music industry is so infested with it.

    http://vigilantcitizen.com/

    http://intheknow7.wordpress.com/

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  75. All_on_Red (1,583 comments) says:

    Good news. We’re not going to drown. Sea level rise is dropping to, gasp, 2mm per year. No wonder the hypocritical alarmists like Tim Flannery, Al Gore, Cate Blanchard et al are comfortable owning beachfront property.

    An interesting new paper published by Nature Climate Change:
    The rate of sea level rise
    Anny Cazenave, Habib-Boubacar Dieng, Benoit Meyssignac, Karina von Schuckmann, Bertrand Decharme & Etienne Berthier
    Abstract. Present-day sea-level rise is a major indicator of climate change. Since the early 1990s, sea level rose at a mean rate of ~3.1 mm yr−1. However, over the last decade a slowdown of this rate, of about 30%, has been recorded. It coincides with a plateau in Earth’s mean surface temperature evolution, known as the recent pause in warming. Here we present an analysis based on sea-level data from the altimetry record of the past ~20 years that separates interannual natural variability in sea level from the longer-term change probably related to anthropogenic global warming. The most prominent signature in the global mean sea level interannual variability is caused by El Niño–Southern Oscillation, through its impact on the global water cycle. We find that when correcting for interannual variability, the past decade’s slowdown of the global mean sea level disappears, leading to a similar rate of sea-level rise (of 3.3 ± 0.4 mm yr−1) during the first and second decade of the altimetry era.
    http://judithcurry.com/2014/04/24/slowing-sea-level-rise/

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  76. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Lucy try this:

    Arrested for quoting Winston Churchill Hitler: European election candidate accused of religious and racial harassment after he repeats wartime prime minister’s words on Islam Jews during campaign speech

    Seems you are not really opposed to religious persecution at all. You have the identical mind set to those who persecuted gods chosen special favourite master race for so long.

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  77. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Good news. We’re not going to drown. Sea level rise is dropping to, gasp, 2mm per year.

    I doubt it is rising that much even, but Griff will be devasted by the news :)

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  78. dirty harry (489 comments) says:

    Lydia Ko has bagged $850000 in winnings since she became pro. Why does she want more of our money?

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  79. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    all know how to die but the influence of the religion paralyses the social development of those who follow it.

    It turns out, the whole concept of libraries being public lending systems and being organized by card catalogs was started by the Muslims, about 200 years after Hijra, during the heights of the Abbasid and Ottoman Empires.

    Books were considered extremely sacred and the Muslims took very seriously the verses in the Quran about the importance of gaining knowledge. Poetry was written about the love people had for their books.

    http://mosaicofmuslimwomen.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/article-islam-and-the-very-first-public-libraries/

    Meanwhile, back in Nil Ziland, public libraries also function as child care centers.

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  80. All_on_Red (1,583 comments) says:

    I thought this comment on the RSS satellite was interesting too.
    “…RSS is still using the old NOAA-15 satellite which has a decaying orbit, to which they are then applying a diurnal cycle drift correction based upon a climate model, which does not quite match reality.”
    The thing is falling out of the sky so are using modelling to make adjustments.

    Great lot of info here about all the different types of measurements used for air and sea temps. WUWT is a brilliant resource. Three time winner of best science weblog in the world and viewed 157 million times!
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2014/04/28/on-the-differences-and-similarities-between-global-surface-temperature-and-lower-troposphere-temperature-anomaly-datasets/

    God explanation here about temps in the Stratosphere. They are controlled by the Sun and with low sun spot activity explains the cooling we are seeing. Nice history of research on it which goes back 100 years.
    http://wattsupwiththat.com/2012/04/30/a-tale-of-two-altitudes-how-stratospheric-temperature-is-de-coupled-from-the-surface-temperatures/

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  81. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    It turns out, the whole concept of libraries being public lending systems and being organized by card catalogs was started by the Muslims, about 200 years after Hijra, during the heights of the Abbasid and Ottoman Empires.

    Jared Diamond, in his book Guns germs and Steel claims modern writing first appeared in the area of modern Syria and that no other writing system developed entirely independant of it. It was the blueprint that led to a literate world.

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  82. OneTrack (3,107 comments) says:

    “Why anyone earning the average wage would vote for these clowns is beyond me”

    Because Dad did?

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  83. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “The constant playing of 70′s Pop/Disco elevator music in malls and supermarkets is clear proof of the existence of Satan.”

    Which begs the q what will music be like in 20 years when todays half naked hip hop is played in malls as antiquated music.

    The vids will even be considered old school.

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  84. slijmbal (1,236 comments) says:

    Dime said

    “A Labour-led government will require the Reserve Bank to use changes to the rate of people’s compulsory KiwiSaver contributions rather than interest rates to control inflation while taking pressure off the over-valued kiwi dollar.”

    Dime asked this question the other day.

    Can someone tell me why this wont work? Im sure it wont but not sure why. Its been many moons since my last economics class!

    ==============================================================================

    If, like me, you believe that the major driver for house price inflation is the massive increase in available credit then it will have minimal effect as the underlying driver will outweigh anything other than a major decrease in available funds, which would require a huge increase in KiwiSaver contributions.

    If it then meant interest rates stayed lower then it is quite likely to exacerbate the situation further and actually cause further price house inflation.

    Our $ is high because currency movements tend to overreact, most of the countries who traditionally have stronger currencies are printing money like there’s no tomorrow and as a ‘commodities based’ currency we’re seen as a safer bet. We’ve had very high interest rates in the past with a weak currency. The link between currency value and interest rates is much less strong for NZ than this policy presumes. Short of copying the ludicrous monetary policies of the like of the US we’re going to have a stronger currency.

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  85. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “They are immortalising the Maori who ran away after the battle,”

    Probably after being decimated by cannon and you are forgetting the medalled Maori of foreign conflict and in particular the VC Maori who just attended Anzac….. and where did you fight ????

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  86. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “Short of copying the ludicrous monetary policies of the like of the US we’re going to have a stronger currency.”

    This is a Federal Reserve strategy to destroy the dollar and replace it with an international currency. Dominated by the UN and US. Putin sees all this and making a stand.

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  87. OneTrack (3,107 comments) says:

    slijmbal – “Short of copying the ludicrous monetary policies of the like of the US we’re going to have a stronger currency.”

    No problem. Labour’s senior coalition partner have the 1 Trillion NZ dollar note all designed and their printers are ready to go.

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  88. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    ““I would like to strongly urge all U.S. citizens: If you have an American flag hanging in your home or place of business, please discontinue using it immediately.”

    Well that’s blowing in the wind. And I hope they mean the milions of dead is because of US direct militay action illegal and otherwise. Cause a flag don’t kill no one.

    What the story really means is the one world flag is almost ready to be unfurled. US military are called UN or NATO troops anyway. Never US.

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  89. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Re duggledog at 8.07 on the exchange rate being doomed by any Labour Government.

    It’s doomed any way, duggledog, as even the bank hypsters admit. After forty years of balance of payments deficits, the NZ dollar is propped up by inflow of loans to balance the national books and by speculation that Chinese switching to milk will bail the country out. However, prices for milk powder, on which we are so heavily dependent, are on the way down. International milk competition is on the rise, with Australia moving towards a free trade agreement with China, and EU limits on herd sizes coming off in 2015.

    I reckon there will be a Labour Government from the end of this year only if the NZ dollar crashes before the election. Whoever has to wrestle with the pain from that in the next Parliamentary term is going to be unpopular for decades. Perhaps we should hope for a Labour win this year, and watch it and the Greens burn in the aftermath.

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  90. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    Ugly,

    So, where are all the Muslim libraries now?

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  91. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    “So, where are all the Muslim libraries now?”

    London ?

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  92. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Re Kea at 12.29:

    Jared Diamond, in his book Guns germs and Steel claims modern writing first appeared in the area of modern Syria and that no other writing system developed entirely independant of it. It was the blueprint that led to a literate world.

    That was thousands of years before Islam was founded, Kea, as I’m sure you are aware.

    Whether Diamond is correct by implying that writing systems such as Chinese and Ancient Egyptian, with their pictograph origins, were influenced by writing systems of the Ancient Sumerians etc, is questionable.

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  93. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    Kea,

    Lucy try this:

    Arrested for quoting Winston Churchill Hitler: European election candidate accused of religious and racial harassment after he repeats wartime prime minister’s words on Islam Jews during campaign speech

    Except, Winston Churchill is revered in Britain, and now a wannabe politician has been arrested over there for quoting from one of this books.

    Seems you are not really opposed to religious persecution at all. You have the identical mind set to those who persecuted gods chosen special favourite master race for so long.

    I made no personal comment about the story.

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  94. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “”Mongrel Mob killer of a young Polynesian farther to be immortalised in photo exhibition:”

    What gets me is Mobsters wee fighting Mobsters, lethally.

    This is good news. Current reports have the Mob and arch rivals Black Power forming CER together. This country is so small eventually business has to align to current conditions. Fortunately again, the Mob are not the sharpest tool in the shed.
    They have never shared BP’s vision for progression. The mob are cavemen. Society is going to benefit from their antiquation hugely.

    I do have to say even the Mob look so P C now. Hair cuts, tidy leathers, Clean T shirts and patches. Sporty and train.

    Gone are the days of filthy reggies with the oil and grime. One Mobster was ridiculed for trying to return to the old style.

    I think we have at least a generation free of social threat from combined gang pan alliance.

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  95. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Books were considered extremely sacred and the Muslims took very seriously the verses in the Quran about the importance of gaining knowledge.

    That was 500 years ago or whereabouts. You must stop living in the past and admit the vile Islam is a backward-looking, violent cult that deserves to be despised by human intelligence.

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  96. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Who will believe him?
    US Secretary of State John Kerry has vehemently denied ever calling Israel “an apartheid state” amid a row over comments reportedly made during a private meeting.

    “I do not believe, not have I ever stated, publicly or privately that Israel is an apartheid state or that it intends to become one,” the top US diplomat said in a strong statement on Monday after calls for him to resign or at least apologise for the alleged comments on Friday to a meeting of international experts.

    http://news.msn.co.nz/worldnews/8836830/kerry-denies-apartheid-state-comment

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  97. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    You must stop living in the past and admit the vile Islam is a backward-looking, violent cult that deserves to be despised by human intelligence.

    The Quran, Surah 96. Surah Al-Alaq (The Clot)

    1. Read! In the Name of your Lord, Who has created (all that exists),
    2. Has created man from a clot (a piece of thick coagulated blood).
    3. Read! And your Lord is the Most Generous,
    4. Who has taught (the writing) by the pen [the first person to write was Prophet Idrees (Enoch)],
    5. Has taught man that which he knew not.

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  98. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Whether Diamond is correct by implying that writing systems such as Chinese and Ancient Egyptian, with their pictograph origins, were influenced by writing systems of the Ancient Sumerians etc, is questionable.

    Jack5, yes it is questionable. I also regard his work sceptically due to his obvious anti-European bias. He has even been caught faking work to promote that bias.

    However he makes some very interesting claims in his book that do seem to stand scrutiny. Unlike the claims made in the books reference by the likes of Lucy, Katie and stupidboy.

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  99. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    For an alternative to the NZ Reserve Bank’s policy on currency control, look at the Swiss central bank.

    So far, it seems to have done well holding down the Swiss franc, and still keeping the country’s economy growing faster than the EC’s.

    No surprise to those of us who recognise the Swiss are smarter than us: their GDP per head in 2013 was USDollars 46,000 last year compared with 30,400 in NZ.

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  100. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Jack5, are you suggesting we be a central bank for organised crime and corrupt dictators too ?

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  101. thedavincimode (6,759 comments) says:

    So, have I got this right?

    Instead of having to pay the nasty banks (ie granny and other bank depositers) more interest, I get to save my interest in a Kiwisaver account?

    Good heavens, if this is the deal that Field Marshall Cunners, VC MC DSO PhD MBA, home renovator of The Somme, Marine Parade, Herne Bay is offering, where do I sign up? And this will reduce inflation … because despite getting subsidised interest costs … I won’t be encouraged to borrow more to save more and nobody else will either so that I can then afford a house … and of course this all works because the Reserve Bank sets mortgage interest rates through the OCR …??

    Maybe Santa really does exist. Is there any more to it than this? Has anyone here been bothered to actually read their peer-reviewed (gasp) policy? Is this really as stupid as it seems in the headlines?

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  102. NoCash (258 comments) says:

    As thedavincimode pointed out, hiking the KiwiSaver savings rate while keeping interest rates low encourages borrowing by robbing savers to subsidise the price of credits.

    Banks don’t make more profit out of a higher OCR. In fact, the opposite is the case as banks rely on the volume of loans to earn profits out of the difference between paying interest to depositors and the interest charged on loans. The OCR affects mainly the short-term rates of both deposits and loans especially floating rate loans. It has very little impact on mid to long term fixed rate loans, as they’re mainly funded from overseas.

    If you want the banks to make less money, then either borrow less or repay your loan faster.

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  103. stephieboy (3,091 comments) says:

    The origins of writing are understood to go back at least to Neolithic times 8,000 years ago where the first attempts to translate speech into symbols were made..But the real beginnings began in Mesopotamia with the Sumerians c 4,000 BC when it became necessary with the rise of cities and expanding empires to provide a means of recording and documenting quantities and measurements etc.The Egyptians at roughly the same time developed hieroglyphs to represent ideas as well as numbers measurement.Thus writing became a necessity to organize and administer City states , Empires and more complex societies.
    Hebrew script began a bit later and owed much and derived a great deal from Phonciean script.
    Chinese character writing that we are more familiar with, began about 1,500 BC, but is thought likely extends far beyond this in it’s more basic forms, The Indus civilization had also developed it’s own unique script devised independently from Mesopatamia etc.Writing therefore appears to have developed in association with more complex, expanding urban and empire building societies. Fascinating subject.

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  104. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    Videos capturing ferry’s final moments fuel fresh outrage over ship’s fate

    I’m not surprised. The video shows the captain stepping off the vessel while it’s listing at around 60 degrees, and gives some audio that indicates the pax below are being told to stay where they are. In other words, when it’s clear the vessel is in grave danger, the captain just removes himself from it without even bothering to tell people they should move up on deck.

    If SK has the death penalty available for this type of crime, he’ll get it, for sure.

    http://edition.cnn.com/2014/04/27/world/asia/south-korea-ferry-video/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

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  105. stephieboy (3,091 comments) says:

    The origins of the Arabic alphabet in a nutshell,

    The history of the Arabic alphabet shows that this abjad has changed since it arose. It is thought that the Arabic alphabet is a derivative of the Nabataean variation of the Aramaic alphabet, which descended from the Phoenician alphabet, which among others gave rise to the Hebrew alphabet and the Greek alphabet (and therefore the Cyrillic and Roman alphabets).

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  106. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Griff, fanatical defender of AGW, will not be thrilled: http://www.spectator.co.uk/australia/australia-features/9187691/climate-change-the-movie/

    With the release last week of the exciting third instalment of the mighty IPCC trilogy ‘Assessment Report 5’, it’s clear that the climate change industry has been closely studying the Hollywood Sci-Fi Blockbuster format.

    From George Lucas’s original Stars Wars trilogy to Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit, Hollywood’s brightest know that to get the biggest bang for your buck, you must release your science fiction saga not as one self-contained epic but as three separate instalments. Not only do you get to spread the storyline out over three lengthy episodes, but each one allows you to leverage and publicise the other two.

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  107. stephieboy (3,091 comments) says:

    My reference re Arabic Alphabet,

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Arabic_alphabet

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  108. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    stephieboy, you correctly note the vast numbers of cultures that emerged from the region. Do you support the right of return of all of them, or only one group ? Amazing how some “Jews” magically appeared amongst a bunch of Arabs, Greeks, Sumerians etc. Remarkable in fact. Even more remarkable is they were just like all the people around them, yet were Jews. Must have been gods work or something… oh wait ! …. they invented that particular god, (after borrowing heavily from the gods around them for inspiration)

    at 12:29…What emerged in modern Syria was an Alphabet. Not little pictures and other symbols or scribbles. Diamonds research indicates this was the – blueprint- of all other Alphabets.

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  109. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    Further to the question earlier about money creation, here’s another article that also references the recent paper from the Bank of England that explained how it works.

    http://govtslaves.info/economists-seriously-discussing-idea-banning-banks/#

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  110. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Kea posted, after I suggested the Swiss central bank’s currency policy was worth watching:

    Jack5, are you suggesting we be a central bank for organised crime and corrupt dictators too ?

    Hell Kea, I thought you might understand how central banks work. They don’t take deposits from individuals, even dictators.

    And not even NZ, one of the world’s least corrupt countries, is exempt from international criminals washing money through our casinos.

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  111. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Kea, in your 3.40 post, you again harp on that what was probably the first alphabet was developed in Syria.

    It wasn’t Syria. There was no Syria then. It was millennia before that country – and Islam – emerged.

    In fact, according to Wikipedia, the alphabet may not have developed even in the fertile crescent of what is now Iraq, and which was the cradle of what eventually became Western civilisation. Here’s what it says of the first alphabet:

    Its first origins can be traced back to a Proto-Sinaitic script developed in Ancient Egypt to represent the language of Semitic-speaking workers in Egypt. This script was partly influenced by the older Egyptian hieratic, a cursive script related to Egyptian hieroglyphs.

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  112. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Jack5

    1. I did not say Syria. Here is the truth: “in the area of modern Syria ”

    2. I did not make any claim. Here is the truth: “Jared Diamond, in his book…”

    I also said I am sceptical of the claim. So what inspired you to make those false statements regarding my comments ? I am genuinely interested to know why an otherwise intelligent man would do that.

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  113. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    What about the central bank, Kia?

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  114. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Jack5, So you reply by changing the subject. Clearly you think Jews are a case for special pleading and suspension of logic and rational thought, because God likes them most. While vomiting hate on anyone else from the region is Gods work. Glad we cleared that up.

    Okay I am wrong. NO dodgy people use Swiss Bank accounts. My bad LOL :)

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  115. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Jack5, what are your views on modesty patrols, acid attacks, beatings of 70 year old women for maybe being* Christian, spitting on Christians, attacks on Christian clergy and places of worship, demanding conservative dress, refusing to sit on a seat a woman has used, making women sit at the back of the bus and all those other things happening daily in Israel ?

    Do you condemn this as primitive ignorant and barbaric, or is it ok for Jews to do this. Yes or no ?

    *Israeli Jews do not target Muslims this way. Only Christians. Possibly due to the centuries of persecution. They are reminded of that by the current rabid hatred against Muslims by Christians. They know how fickle Christians are.

    Well that is the view of the learned Rabbi:

    jewish world

    Dr Ruchama Weiss . Rabbi Levi Brackman

    Rabbi Baruch Efrati believes Jews should ‘rejoice at the fact that Europe is paying for what it did to us for hundreds of years by losing its identity.’ He praises Islam for promoting modesty, respect for God

    “With the help of God, the gentiles there will adopt a healthier life with a lot of modesty and integrity, and not like the hypocritical Christianity which appears pure but is fundamentally corrupt,” he explained.

    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4299673,00.html

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  116. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/new-saints/pope-john-paul-ii-crucifix-falls-crushes-man-death-n89546

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  117. OneTrack (3,107 comments) says:

    Kea – “NO dodgy people use Swiss Bank accounts. My bad LOL ”

    Damn right. Dodgy people use the Cayman Islands. The same place where David Shearer has his loot stashed. ( But I would have thought he would have moved it to KiwiBank by now. Never mind. )

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  118. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Reid, almost as funny as the Popes peace doves being ripped apart by Crows and Seagulls as soon as they were released :)

    -Doves released in the Vatican as a gesture of peace are immediately ATTACKED by vicious seagull and crow-

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2546218/Birds-released-Vatican-gesture-peace-immediately-attacked-vicious-seagull-crow.html#ixzz30FRbAUj0

    I blame the Muslims. Of course ;)

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  119. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    This is interesting.

    http://tarpley.net/alleged-osce-observers-are-nato-officers/

    Obama et al seems constantly to forget he is dealing with forces that are well versed and well equipped in surveillance, intelligence and strategic capabilities. Nuland’s phone conversation for example, you can bet, is not the only inconvenient truth that’s waiting in the wings to be released at just the right moment.

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  120. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Where else would OSCE get military observers from, if not NATO nations?

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  121. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Kea, you are unbelievable!

    You and I are discussing first, the origins of the world’s first alphabet, and second, central banks and currency, and out of the blue you demand to know my views about Jews.

    What ever you are on, halve the dose! If that doesn’t work, halve it again!

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  122. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Jack5
    I think it’s the other way around: double dosage required for Kea. Cognitive therapy might be useful as well.

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  123. nasska (11,525 comments) says:

    Okay, so they were beaten on the shower heads but they haven’t given up. Coming soon….. :)

    Ref: https://www.dropbox.com/s/3h7cfc4tgxf9osx/Chandalier.jpg

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  124. RRM (9,924 comments) says:

    Plane in the sky.

    Could this be the most useless caption ever applied to a photo by the mainstream media?

    http://tvnz.co.nz/world-news/plane-fire-leaving-perth-5943853

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  125. Reid (16,471 comments) says:

    Where else would OSCE get military observers from, if not NATO nations?

    Tarpley is suggesting they are active-duty NATO officers from a base that specialises in recon missions. Given the West is alleging there has been a spontaneous grassroots uprising which the Russians are wuthlessly supwessing, this revelation, if proven, will be extremely embarrassing to the West since it gives the lie to the meme which is patently obvious to all but the most fanatically idiotic of the millions if not billions of useful idiots who believe the MSM fiction of the spontaneous gwasswoots upwising.

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  126. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Jack5, still waiting for any answer as to why you so clearly misrepresented what I had said ? I was left to speculate. Maybe I got it wrong, or maybe I was close to the truth.

    I must say it is lonely here on KB being the only one condemning the actions of misogynistic religious fanatics, who treat women like filth, beat them and throw acid on them. Not a single other voice has spoken up. Maybe I am just a big softy and need to harden the fuck up. They probably deserved it, wearing trousers, being a suspected Christian, not wearing conservative dress, not sitting at the back of the bus. No fooling those Jews, they are not letting those bitches get away with it ! And the numbers of fundamentalist Jews is INCREASING rapidly and much of this IS an everyday occurrence in Israel. Of course with the blessings of the KB folk.

    Maybe this marks a sea-change on KB. Next time some guy does this to a woman in NZ I look forward to silence, or at least a few remarks that most guys don’t do it, or its not sanctioned by the government. That sort of thing. No condemnation, because then you would be a bunch of two face bigoted scum and we would not want to be two faced biggoted scum now would we boys and girls ?

    And you are all probably right in applying different standards based on religion and persecuting one particular religion. I am sure Jews are really comfortable with that. Why would they not be !

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  127. nasska (11,525 comments) says:

    Worth noting if any of you are using IE:

    ….”Microsoft has warned users of security flaw in the company’s Internet Explorer browser that could allow hackers to take “complete control” of a user’s computer.

    The glitch affects versions 6 to 11 of Internet Explorer, which collectively account for more than 50 per cent of global web traffic.”……

    Ref: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11246251

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  128. ex-golfer (161 comments) says:

    @Dirty Harry
    At the risk of repeating myself – Lydia Ko is NOT seeking any financial support from the NZ taxpayer.
    NZ Golf made a funding application, using Lydia Ko as a basis for the application. Their reasoning is that she is best placed to win an Olympic gold for NZ. I am doubtful that even if they were successful, any money would go to Ko (especially knowing how NZ golf operate!!).
    Ko did not even know they were doing it.
    I see today that NZ Golf are now back-tracking and reviewing the application – a pity they didn’t withdraw it as soon as it became “news”

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  129. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Thanks for clearing that up, ex. We were talking about this at work today and I’m glad to see some common sense has prevailed.

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  130. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    Whoops! Up until now, the Germans have not wanted to go down too hard on Russia. But capturing and parading German officers has disturbed them greatly!

    Capture of German observers prompts tougher talk from Berlin:

    The spectacle of German army officers being held prisoner and paraded before television cameras in eastern Ukraine could provoke a hardening of the German response to the ongoing crisis.

    Angela Merkel’s government has reacted furiously after pro-Russian rebels showed off captured observers from the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) for the cameras, calling it an act of “hostage-taking” and a “revolting spectacle”, and demanding their immediate release.

    Until now, Germany has been a conciliatory voice over Ukraine. Ms Merkel’s government has been reluctant to sign up to economic sanctions against Russia, and argued against any show of force by Nato.

    But after television pictures showed a German officer forced to speak for the cameras while a masked gunman stood behind him, the language coming out of Berlin has toughened.

    Why?

    Germany’s reluctance to confront Vladimir Putin’s government over the crisis in Ukraine stems in part from its strong economic ties with Russia.

    Germany relies on Russia for 36 per cent of its gas imports and 39 per cent of its oil, and German businesses fear they could be hit by sanctions.

    But German commentators argue it dates back further, to the successful West German policy of engagement with Warsaw Pact countries during the Cold War – and even to the Second World War.

    “As a country that committed monstrous crimes against the Russians, we sometimes feel the need to be especially generous, even in dealing with Russia’s human rights violations,” Christiane Hoffman wrote in Der Spiegel.

    Pity the Russians don’t suffer from war guilt and communist guilt.

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  131. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Don’t they Lucia? Not a single one of them? I should imagine that it’s in pretty much direct proportion to the number of British that feel guilty for the bombing of Dresden or Hamburg.

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  132. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    Doesn’t seem to be a national thing like the Germans have. There are a few, from what I’ve read in Last Man in Russia. If it was a national mentality, then this whole Ukraine crisis wouldn’t be occurring as Russians would know exactly what it looks like.

    Edited to add: That’s an interesting comparison, Mike, that you’ve edited on. Especially since a great number of Poles flew on those bombing missions to Dresden, and they considered that payback for the complete destruction of Warsaw, just prior to those missions.

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  133. UglyTruth (4,551 comments) says:

    showed off captured observers from the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) for the cameras

    The Telegraph is toeing the line…

    the seizure of European military observers by pro-Russian militants

    But the NZ Herald is hedging its bets.

    I’m with Reid on this one, the Russians have had some stellar intelligence information of late.

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  134. mikenmild (11,247 comments) says:

    Yes, national suffering on a vast scale does not necessarily lead to empathy on a similar scale.

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  135. big bruv (13,904 comments) says:

    Germans and Russians pissed off with each other, what could possibly go wrong with that?

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  136. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “Germans and Russians pissed off with each other, what could possibly go wrong with that?”

    Sure we’ll learn in the times ahead.

    Russian’s parading captured German officers is an all out war scenario. Germany understands that implicitly.

    Putin is no friend of NATO. He’s pushing the envelope.

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  137. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “Especially since a great number of Poles flew on those bombing missions to Dresden, and they considered that payback for the complete destruction of Warsaw, just prior to those missions.”

    That’s really profound history.

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  138. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    OPINION: National wants us to focus on the lazy stereotype of dole bludgers.

    I’d like to start this column by making it plain I have nothing whatsoever against those on the public teat taking overseas trips on the taxpayers of New Zealand.

    Prince William and Princess Catherine are a lovely couple, and I won’t hear a word against them.

    As far as I’m concerned, the estimated $1 million cost of their New Zealand visit is worth every cent.

    What I can’t understand is the Government once again making a song and dance about those other, arguably less photogenic beneficiaries who look to the public purse for their livelihood.

    Beneficiary-bashing is, of course, a time-honoured political tradition. Like advertising, it’s annoying, but it works. Who doesn’t hate being ripped off by fraudsters who try to milk the welfare system?

    What I hate more, however, is the dog-whistle to the small-minded, irrational envy that resides in all of us that someone, somewhere, is getting a better deal or an easier ride than we are.

    In one of the more gratuitous examples of this, Social Development Minister Paula Bennett recently trumpeted that “more than 21,000 beneficiaries have had their income support cut for travelling overseas” since last July.

    Bennett is apparently “staggered” by the number of beneficiaries who are travelling internationally without informing their paymaster.

    “Every day we hear stories of how people cannot live on the benefit. Today you’re hearing that literally thousands can not only live on it but can afford to travel overseas as well,” she said.

    Actually it isn’t so much a dog whistle as a klaxon.

    Bennett is saying, loud and clear, that she doesn’t really believe beneficiaries have it tough.

    And she’s inviting the rest of us to join in and condemn anyone who dares complain.

    Why might that be?

    Bennett doesn’t provide an answer, but leaves us to draw the obvious implication – the bludgers are heading off to lie on a beach under a palm tree.

    I suppose it’s possible a few may have actually done this, possibly falling to the temptation of easy credit with astronomical interest rates practically rammed down their throats by South Auckland loan sharks.

    Given the relentless, grinding poverty most beneficiaries live in, I wouldn’t blame them for snapping and worrying about the consequences later.

    I suspect the vast majority, however, were seeing their families in Australia or the Pacific Islands; visiting grandchildren or sick relatives or attending funerals. Others may have been testing the job market in Australia.

    Bennett didn’t say how long these beneficiaries were away. There’s a huge difference between a week with the family in Melbourne and shacking up in a South Pacific bolthole while continuing to draw a taxpayer-funded benefit.

    She did, however, acknowledge that in most cases it was likely that the cost of the trip was funded by beneficiaries’ wider families – which somewhat contradicted her stance that they were obviously getting too much support from the taxpayer.

    I have no problem with the Government cracking down on abuse of public money – indeed, I expect it to do so. But I would like some perspective, and a little less histrionics

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/opinion/9932258/Beneficiary-bashing-just-too-easy

    Absolutely. The substance of integrity and balance is essential. Not biased whinging and wining to appease supporters.

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  139. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    It’s estimated welfare fraud costs the country between $20 million and $40m a year. Tax evasion, about which the Government has much less to say, has been estimated to cost the country anywhere from $1 billion to $6b a year.

    Why the double standard? Could it be that beneficiaries are an easy target? I hope it isn’t that simple, because Bennett is a better minister than that, and should have more empathy with those at the bottom of the heap, given her back story.

    So why else shout “look over there!” right at the moment? Well, Finance Minister Bill English provided one reason a couple of days later, when he acknowledged that Crown income receipts were about $1b below forecast, blowing a big hole in the Government’s books and making it exceedingly difficult for National to deliver its much-anticipated “micro-surplus” in next month’s Budget.

    Coincidentally, a billion dollars is also the sum of money this government lost to South Canterbury Finance investors when it was forced to make good their deposits under the guarantee issued during the global financial crisis.

    Three men who played leading roles in SCF are right now before the High Court, charged by the Serious Fraud Office with lying to investors, and to the Government to get into the Crown guarantee scheme shortly before the company collapsed in a heap of debt.

    The massive loss of public funds is highly embarrassing to National, despite Prime Minister John Key’s best efforts to blame Labour for setting up the deposit guarantee before it left office in 2008. While it’s true the original scheme was Labour’s, it applied only to the banking sector – the ill-advised decision to extend the scheme to the finance companies was made on National’s watch.*

    We all know what happened.

    And we can all see how this biased blog can easily be contradicted . Ahaa!!!!

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  140. Lucia Maria (2,428 comments) says:

    “Especially since a great number of Poles flew on those bombing missions to Dresden, and they considered that payback for the complete destruction of Warsaw, just prior to those missions.”

    That’s really profound history.

    You are just so clueless. The Germans spend 3 months utterly destroying it before they withdrew. That was after a two month urban battle with inhabitants during which time 250,000 people were killed, 50,000 of which were within the first few days of door to door massacres.

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  141. nasska (11,525 comments) says:

    Two teenage boys turned up at church and the first went in for
    confession. He told the priest he’d had sex the night before.

    “Who was the girl involved?” asked the priest.

    “I don’t know, it was dark,” replied the boy.

    “Was it Bernadette McLafferty?”

    The boy said he still didn’t know.

    “Was it Theresa O’Hare………or Rosemary McGinty?” asked the
    priest.

    “I don’t know, it was too dark,” insisted the boy.

    “Could it have been Anne-Marie, the baker’s daughter?” asked the
    priest.

    The boy continued to deny any knowledge of the girl’s identity.

    Finally, the exasperated priest sent the boy away and told him to
    return when he could reveal the girl’s name.

    Outside his friend was waiting anxiously.

    “Did you get absolution?” he asked.

    “Nah,” said his mate, “but I got four good leads!”

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  142. Kea (12,841 comments) says:

    Maybe Obama is not so bad after all. This is sound policy :)

    Slamming his fists on the lectern until his hands began to bleed, Obama proceeded to lay out a “three-point plan of sin and lechery” for his second term. If reelected, the president said, he would begin by banning organized religion entirely—starting with Christianity—and burning all churches to the ground, preferably “with their wretched, Jesus-loving congregants still huddled inside like rats.”

    Added Obama, “Thank you, may Satan reward you all, and may God tremble in fear at the United States of America!”

    The president was then handed an unbaptized, orphaned newborn baby drenched in the blood of 666 slaughtered Christians, which he handed over to its new, gleefully squealing homosexual parents.

    http://www.theonion.com/articles/obama-help-us-destroy-jesus-and-start-a-new-age-of,29478/

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  143. Tictactoe (32 comments) says:

    A friend of mine commented to me the other day that Russia has kind of fucked itself – it cannot rely on having the monopoly of supplying gas to keep Europe in line – it is now Spring and heading into summer and they will not be needing huge amounts of gas for heating and so on for many months yet.
    You can also see that Russia will probably suffer economically long term, they will now not be seen as reliable and governments will actively try to diversify sources.

    You also have to wonder at the actual proportion of Ukranians in the affected cities/regions (Donettsk I believe it is?) who actually want to be under Russian rule. It seems telling that a very few well armed people have grabbed control and are pushing the rest forcibly to what they personally want.

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  144. Jack5 (5,137 comments) says:

    Tictactoe (9.12), Bob Jones has published a different view on Russia and its row with Ukraine.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11245828

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  145. Manolo (13,780 comments) says:

    Will the Messiah take advantage of it? http://news.msn.co.nz/worldnews/8837147/kenyan-president-signs-polygamy-law

    A law allowing men in Kenya to marry as many women as they want has been signed into law by President Uhuru Kenyatta, despite criticism from women’s groups.

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  146. Left Right and Centre (2,979 comments) says:

    Minus hahaha.

    The Campbell show last night confirmed the users are all ferals.

    I hate agreeing with kowtow but bang on. In fact – most of the ordinary people in Campbell Live stories have something severely wrong with them. The most common one is that they’re just fucking hideously seriously ugly looking – fat as anything – dumb – and scroungy bad taste and generally unpleasant and undesirable and a total turn-off. Hard to watch and listen to my friend. I do try my best but life’s too short to spend time with dickheads . . . no ?

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  147. Left Right and Centre (2,979 comments) says:

    The most painfully awkward set-up on TV currently is The Paul Henry Show 9 in 10 game; when you know the person they’ve picked is a total munter. The real game is guessing how many if any answers they will get.

    I wonder – to limit the number of new cars that get given away – do they make sure they pick a few no-hopers ?

    BTW – I’d never win that game. Ten seconds aint a lot of time – to name nine of anything. If I was asked to name nine of my friends I’d be really rooted – hahahaha

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  148. kowtow (8,487 comments) says:

    “I hate agreeing with kowtow”

    Go on, you know you want to.

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  149. wikiriwhis business (4,016 comments) says:

    “You are just so clueless.”

    As usual on this blog. Taking me out of context. That attitude is so illiterate and uneducated

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  150. Andronicus (219 comments) says:

    Interesting to note the National Party has chosen two ex tobacco lobbyists as candidates for September (Todd Barclay in Southland and Chris Bishop in Hutt South). Barclay will win, Bishop probably lose.

    Today’s DomPost sums it up nicely:

    “One tobacco lobbyist in the National caucus might be an accident. Two begins to make National look like a party whose anti-tobacco stance is hollow and hypocritical.

    National will no doubt argue that tobacco is a legal industry and so it is.

    Morally, however, big tobacco is indefensible – and so are those who are paid advocates for it.”

    Well said.

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