How NZ is ranking

April 7th, 2014 at 9:00 am by David Farrar

Have had a quick look through the global country rankings that have come out in the last year or two, to see how NZ is placed. Have to say pretty good overall. Here’s what I’ve got, remembering there are around 200 countries:

  • Rule of Law 6th
  • Economic Freedom 5th
  • Best to do business in 2nd
  • Least Corrupt 1st
  • Open Data 4th
  • Prosperous 5th
  • Best to be a woman 7th
  • Competitiveness 18th
  • Peaceful 3rd
  • Democratic 5th
  • Human Development 6th
  • Best for working women 1st
  • Freedom 1st
  • Open Budget 2nd
  • Best to be a mother 4th
  • Humanitarian responses 3rd
  • Smallest gender gap 5th
  • Generous 1st
  • Least failed 7th
  • Trade competitiveness 4th
  • Social progress 1st

You have to say overall New Zealand is a pretty awesome place!

You also wonder at those who claim the neo-liberal reforms have made New Zealand such an awful place that we need to over-throw them.

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28 Responses to “How NZ is ranking”

  1. mikenmild (11,231 comments) says:

    Yes, we live in a pretty good place to be. Not that you’d know it from the usual chorus of naysayers in the blogosphere. I look forward to this thread cataloguing everything that is wrong with NZ.

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  2. Keeping Stock (10,161 comments) says:

    It’s certainly a blow to the argument put forward by all the women MP’s from Labour and the Greens that women don’t get a fair go in New Zealand.

    Perhaps the likes of Sue Moroney, Maryan Street, Jan Logie and co need to spend time in some of those countries ranking below New Zealand in such measures as Best to be a Woman (7th), Best for Working Women (1st), Best to be a Mother (4th) and Smallest Gender Gap (5th).

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  3. Duxton (589 comments) says:

    Are Sue Moroney, Maryan Street and Jan Logie women?

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  4. dime (9,607 comments) says:

    no ranking for blokes?

    boys are falling behind at school and uni and no one gives a fuck cause.. they arent girls.

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  5. Judith (8,241 comments) says:

    I fail to see how neo-liberal politics can claim these results as having very much to do with them?

    Nice try to take the glory, but it is our historic struggles that have lead to our strengths in the vast majority of these stats. For example, our welfare system (yes, I know, eeekkkk).

    If the results are as good in 20 years time, then by all means neo-liberalism can take a bow – until then, they are piggybacking (not an enviable thing to do).

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  6. Judith (8,241 comments) says:

    @ dime (8,680 comments) says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 9:17 am

    Well dime, with the male chromosomes dropping, we’re just preparing ourselves for the very very sad state of having to do without the boys! :-)

    In all reality, as parliament demonstrates, the majority in power positions are ‘boys’. If they don’t take care of themselves, or are too scared to, then the ‘girls’ have already won (whatever competition we are supposedly in).

    IMO, we are different – always have been, always will be – until we stop trying to force the ‘unisex’ approach of one size fits all, the more headway we will make in education etc.

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  7. EAD (776 comments) says:

    I’ve always maintained the best way to view NZ is to live outside it (not Australia) for several years and experience different cultures first hand. You will then see things through a completely different set of eyes.

    One of the best assets the country has is it’s people – some of the most innovative, friendly, can-do people in the world. I do think we tend to be too trusting of those in power and politically naive due to not having a long history that has not seen revolutions, invasions, major inflations and is about as far from the rest of the world as is possible. It is why so many people got suckered into the Finance Company fiascos which were obviously too good to be true but people didn’t believe they were being suckered.

    The only thing I’d majorly disagree with is the belief that we are a”free” country. NZ is one of the biggest nanny state countries in the world. They even regulate where, when you can buy something to drink for crying out loud! Want to have a beer in the park – like fun! Want to have a smoke – the nanny state is even going to decide for you what sort of packaging it comes in.

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  8. Elaycee (4,322 comments) says:

    Agree Milkmilo: When KB is being dominated (some would say, overrun) by debates between atheists V god squad; conspiracy theorists V those living on planet earth; the AGW alarmists V pragmatists and the ‘know all’ folk who try and brow beat everyone by sheer volume of comments etc, you know things can’t be all bad.

    In fact, I suspect the majority of people who bleat and moan about NZ, haven’t travelled much beyond NSW or QLD.

    EDIT: @EAD… Snap.

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  9. kowtow (7,871 comments) says:

    Who makes up this shit?

    Where’s best to be a man and working man? Why’s gender etc in there.

    Cultural marxism wheedling in everywhere.

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  10. mikenmild (11,231 comments) says:

    There’s no reason to suppose a ranking of men’s rights and working men’s rights wouldn’t produce a high ranking for NZ as well.
    But I suspect your real question is why the focus on women’s rights. Perhaps it’s because women in many countries don’t enjoy the degree of equality they have in NZ.

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  11. Hugh Pavletich (94 comments) says:

    By these measures … Texas must be in heaven !

    Unaffordable housing is a sure sign of dysfunctional governance. I touched on these issues earlier in the year within “China: Big Bubble Trouble” … which incorporated a link to an important speech by Daniel Hannan MEP on Anglosphere values …

    http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1401/S00034/china-big-bubble-trouble.htm

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  12. mandk (859 comments) says:

    but didn’t you know, Dime, you don’t count if you are male, especially if you are heterosexual.

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  13. EAD (776 comments) says:

    Who makes up this shit?

    Comrade Kowtow – the same people who tell us that tractor production is up again and that we’ve always been at war with East Asia.

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  14. Albert_Ross (266 comments) says:

    I’ve been at a few seminars etc recently at which it was remarked, and unchallenged, that New Zealand’s is a risk-averse culture.

    I’d be interested in any views. Do fellow commenters agree? On what basis?

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  15. radvad (689 comments) says:

    Judith said “Well dime, with the male chromosomes dropping, we’re just preparing ourselves for the very very sad state of having to do without the boys!”

    Great, I cannot wait for women to say they do not need my taxes to fund their breeding programmes, their health care, education, personal securiy etc etc. Bring it on.

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  16. Judith (8,241 comments) says:

    @ radvad (618 comments) says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 10:03 am

    Unless you plan on living over a thousand years or more, I don’t think it is going to happen in your time.

    I pay tax, more than the ol man now. Worked (home based) whilst bringing up my children in partnership with him, so, perhaps I’ve been funding your breeding programme, health, education, security etc, because as far as I am aware, all those things are still available to males?

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  17. backster (2,106 comments) says:

    So how does McKinnon’s (and your) precious republics stack up.

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  18. OTGO (521 comments) says:

    Best to be a homo 1st

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  19. spanish_tudor (56 comments) says:

    And in all likelihood 90% of the top performing countries in all these indices are monarchies, and will remain so. Makes a mockery of your McKinnon post DPF.

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  20. Rex Widerstrom (5,307 comments) says:

    Albert_Ross asks:

    I’ve been at a few seminars etc recently at which it was remarked, and unchallenged, that New Zealand’s is a risk-averse culture.

    I’d be interested in any views. Do fellow commenters agree? On what basis?

    I do. I could write an essay on why but here’s a few ‘headlines’, picked pretty much at random:

    - Investment behaviour. We all want Genesis and Telecom shares. There are property investors galore, making it hard for first home buyers to compete. But look at any interview with any entrepreneur (and paradoxically, entrepreneurs abound here) and they’ll tell you they’ve had a hell of a job to raise venture capital. NZ consistently comes up with world-leading technology, so the chances of an “angel” investor getting a good return is better than most. But very few of us want to take a punt (unlike our obsession with $20 million Lotto prizes, the odds of which are astronomical).

    - Law. As alluded to above. We seem to be only too happy to be told what we can drink, where we can drink it, when we can buy it. We’re happy for rational adults to be penalised for making choices which – if they turn out to be wrong – affect only us and no one else (cannabis use, bike helmets, taking home a “doggy bag” etc). Yet we admire everyone from All Blacks to base jumpers who risk their necks outside of day-to-day activities, as though by living vicariously through them we can compensate for being wrapped in cotton wool by the state.

    - Employment. “Cultural fit” now outweighs most everything, including competence and experience. We used to be able to cope with the curmudgeon in the corner or the bore who retold stale jokes provided they were good at their jobs. Now the slightest bit of “colour” will get you overlooked, let alone a reputation as a square peg. As a result our workplaces have become sanitised, filled with people chosen for their conformity. That also relates back to law… employing the boorish oaf who happens to be the best at his job will now likely land you with an ERA settlement.

    - Politics. Try and find someone – anyone – who’s happy with the current state of politics. Yet, given the chance to make changes to MMP that might have prevented, for instance, major parties being held to ransom by minor parties, we did nothing. I’d argue that, politically speaking, things are worse now than when we first opted for MMP over FPP, but we’re no longer willing to risk change.

    I’m not suggesting we’re alone in this. Certainly I could say the same things about every state in Australia. They haven’t even tried to change their antiquated electoral system in the first place.

    But while we take well deserved pride in the things we’re good at, we need to acknowledge the things we could improve – and this national timidity is chief amongst them.

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  21. Albert_Ross (266 comments) says:

    Rex Widerstrom at 1:57, thank you for that. But as you part-acknowledge in your penultimate para, NZ is not alone – and is it even unusual among developed economies in any of this? In what comparable societies will you generally find consistently greater willingness among ordinary investors to take a punt on a new business venture, more relaxed attitudes to health and safety risks, greater tolerance of maverick behaviour in the workplace, higher satisfaction with politics? What I am trying to get at is whether this risk aversion is a particular trait of New Zealand culture or more like the way of the world these days.

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  22. hj (6,608 comments) says:

    mikenmild (8,435 comments) says:
    April 7th, 2014 at 9:09 am

    Yes, we live in a pretty good place to be.
    ……….
    but it is current policy to increase the population. There is no mandate but the 3 stooges (National, Labour, Green) are letting it happen anyway. Aucklanders have seen a drop in their quality of life (already).

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  23. mikenmild (11,231 comments) says:

    I’d argue that agreement between the parties would indicate quite a broad mandate in favour of present population policies.

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  24. deadrightkev (319 comments) says:

    If we are the least corrupt its a grossly distorted world out there.

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  25. publicwatchdog (2,225 comments) says:

    Missed this one David?

    If New Zealand is purported to be the ‘least corrupt country in the world’ (along with Denmark, according to the Transparency International 2013 ‘Corruption Perception Index’) , then shouldn’t we be the MOST ‘transparent’ and LEAST financially secretive?

    So – how come New Zealand is ranked 48th out of 82 countries in the Tax Justice Network’s ‘Financial Secrecy Index’?
    _________________________________________________________________________________________________________.

    Secrecy is an essential ingredient for corruption.

    http://www.financialsecrecyindex.com/introduction/fsi-2013-results

    Kind regards,

    Penny Bright

    ‘Anti-corruption / anti-privatisation Public Watchdog’

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  26. Dean Papa (775 comments) says:

    You missed one DPF,

    1st for cockiness

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10770562

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  27. Dean Papa (775 comments) says:

    Hospitality- 1st

    “Meanwhile New Zealanders demonstrated their patriotism by voting themselves as the most hospitable!”

    http://www.lonelyplanet.com/press/2004/01/14/lonely-planet-survey-of-independent-travellers-finds-thailand-and-italy-are-hot-favourites/

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  28. RupertB (4 comments) says:

    DPF, another one for your list is the Global Slavery Index 2013. New Zealand ranks 7th out of 162 countries for “Countries with lowest prevalence of modern slavery”. http://www.globalslaveryindex.org/findings/#overview

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