A young conman

May 2nd, 2014 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

Stuff reports:

At 20 years old, Hamilton’s Andrew Colin George Jacobs is already a career conman with 40 convictions.

His modus operandi? Everything from lying to police to blackmail and forgery – basically anything to get a quick buck.

He owes more than $14,000 in reparations to his victims.

This week Jacobs was back before the courts and was jailed for five months for three charges of obtaining by deception and one of using a document for pecuniary advantage – three weeks after being imprisoned for 13 months for blackmail, in the High Court at Hamilton.

I like to believe in rehabilitation, and certainly many young people can turn from a life of crime – especially if they have drug or alcohol addictions.

However, earlier this month he was sent to prison for further fraud offending – including blackmail – after falsely telling a 17-year-old girl he had cancer in order to get part of her dead father’s estate.

He was sentenced to jail by Justice Gilbert on April 3, who at that stage was concerned about his criminal history of 36 convictions.

It was while on bail awaiting sentencing on those blackmail charges that Jacobs committed his latest offending, between December last year and January this year.

It involved him using an alias to buy a Toyota Altezza via Trade Me for $8350.

Jacobs forged a “nationwide bank” email confirming he had transferred funds into the victim’s account.

Jacobs doesn’t seem to be from a “disadvantaged” background, or be in a culture of drugs or violence. He just seems to be a greedy little c*** who has no regard for the people he rips off.

Hopefully he will dislike prison enough to change his ways. I’m not optimistic though.A

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22 Responses to “A young conman”

  1. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    Sounds a bit like a young “Tojo” Cunliffe!

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  2. duggledog (1,431 comments) says:

    Another great example of the modern New Zealand ‘justice’ system’s complete inability to do anything to protect ordinary kiwis from petty criminals like this. They should never have removed the option of caning in schools.

    I hear they are just starting to talk about 3S for burglary.

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  3. fernglas (119 comments) says:

    What a lot of these recidivist conmen have in common is a sense of entitlement, and also a belief in the rightness of whatever they are doing. Effectively they are so convincing because they con themselves as well. I have dealt with many of them and they don’t improve with old age, nor do they change. Like paedophilia, it is a personality trait that can be managed but only with the incentive of prison. Hope it works for this guy, not just for his sake but for his otherwise inevitable parade of future victims.

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  4. Komata (1,142 comments) says:

    Thanks fernglas; very enlightening.

    In your opinion, how DO we stop these individuals? Jail probably won’t work (and will, if anything, probably hone their skills), so what are the options? It would appear that these individuals don’t see that they are doing ‘wrong’, there is no ‘medical’ treatment for the ‘condition, and there is an unwillingness to recognize that they actually have a ‘problem’ anyway. Based on this, is it correct to say that there aren’t very many alternatives available? Permanent (‘forever’-type) imprisonment is unlikely and therefore not really an option. In short, therefore, can it be concluded there are actually NO options, and that all ‘society’ can do is to try an limit the size and effect of the offending?

    Thanks.

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  5. J Bloggs (173 comments) says:

    I wouldn’t be surprised if a psychiatric evaluation of Jacobs came back with a finding of either narcissitic personality disorder or psychopathic personality disorder. He has already learnt (over a period of time) that lies and deception without regard for others can be rewarding. All being caught is going to do is teach him to be better at not being caught in the future. You are not going to be able to rehabilitate this one. Unfortunately, he is going be a thorn in the side of society for a very long time.

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  6. Judith (8,404 comments) says:

    This type of thing happens time and time again.

    and this is the reason why I think the three strikes rule is not complete. It is our young offenders that should be receiving the most attention – the first time the break the law in a serious manner they should have every available measure thrown at them, to prevent them developing crime as a way of life. Hit them hard enough the first time, and in many cases there won’t be a second. Instead we take the soft approach – hoping they won’t do it again.

    It is highly unlikely this individual will ever stop now – even when incarcerated he will take delight in conning the other inmates and staff. Once a fraudster learns the tricks of the trade and develops the habit they never stop – only their MO alters to allow them more efficiency and less detection. You got to stop them before it becomes a habit.

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  7. Left Right and Centre (2,876 comments) says:

    Downside of prison is that you’ve got all the time in the world to impart your wisdom on others.

    CrimeTec: Not knowing enough is the real offence !!

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  8. Judith (8,404 comments) says:

    @ fernglas (41 comments) says:
    May 2nd, 2014 at 7:34 am

    Totally agree – there is a saying ‘once a fraudsters always a fraudster – they are one of the worst types of offenders to deal with.

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  9. jcuk (637 comments) says:

    We need an island to which they can be sent which doesn’t cost the NZ taxpayer keeping them fed and housed in prison … perhaps Norfolk Island style? or export them to the UK the way the British sent people to Australia for much less serious offences? Working their way by sailing ship rather than the luxury of a 757.

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  10. bringbackdemocracy (415 comments) says:

    List candidate for NZ First????????

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  11. Komata (1,142 comments) says:

    Out of interest;

    Do ‘Con Men’ make good company directors? (‘Birds of a feather’ and all that…)

    Just wondering.

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  12. duggledog (1,431 comments) says:

    Komata

    Here’s how you stop shit like this from offending; you don’t breed them in the first place. But it’s waaaay too late for that thanks to appalling decisions made by our representatives over the generations. This little c*** is only one of thousands unfortunately

    Dollars to donuts he will be from a shit family, and most likely they passed their traits on to him. If he was from a good family, in the old days he would have been chucked into the army four years ago. In the UK they used to ship the naughty boys off to the colonies :)

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  13. Left Right and Centre (2,876 comments) says:

    Send Andrew to Iran. Watch sand sold to Arabs. Or hand cutting. Either either

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  14. jp_1983 (200 comments) says:

    Jail will protect the public from getting conned by him while he serves a third of the his sentence.

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  15. stephieboy (2,518 comments) says:

    The only thing I can think of is a form of preventative detention with a strict regime whilst the low life remains in custody..Not quite a bread and water regime but running close, but suffiecently uncomfortable that it may make him think twice or three times, once he gets out under, of course , strict parole conditions.
    This is about the only thing I can think of and as DPF suggests, is he capable of ” rehabilitation.?” Most narcisstics and psychopaths are not, it appears.

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  16. Bad__Cat (140 comments) says:

    If he is not going to Change, we need to warn the public. “Thief” tattoo’d on his forehead should do it.

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  17. wf (397 comments) says:

    Perhaps he went through that stage as young boys do, where they try out their skill at persuading Mum, by force of charm, to give them something that they want. Or be allowed to do, or simply to succeed in their argument.
    Once learnt this is a handy skill to have, and this boy seems to have become adept.

    Moral of the story is for Mums (and I guess there might be a vulnerable dad or two)not to allow them to succeed at their first attempt, because look where it can lead to!

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  18. RRM (9,638 comments) says:

    You’re purty. From now on, you’re my bitch.

    Squeal like a little pig, boy!

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  19. Left Right and Centre (2,876 comments) says:

    Bad__Cat – and sell some bodyspace to advertisers – get some reparation out of it too.

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  20. wikiriwhis business (3,883 comments) says:

    He’s a kid in an economy with no oportunities. Simple as that

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  21. Warren Murray (291 comments) says:

    Facial tatoo to warn everyone he meets would be a good starter.

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  22. Left Right and Centre (2,876 comments) says:

    He’s a kid in an economy with no oportunities. Simple as that

    I’m surprised with all the no-hopers the NZ economy fails to provide enough opportunities for that there aren’t tens of thousands of con artists and crims trying to make an alternative living.

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