Did Collins and Jones save Cunliffe?

May 10th, 2014 at 11:50 am by David Farrar

Claire Trevett writes:

As for Labour, Grant Robertson wanted Cunliffe’s job last September. Last week, things were so fragile he might have been in with a chance. List MPs were doing the numbers as internal polling showed them diving into the low to mid-20s and Cunliffe with stratospherically high negative ratings.

One poll was reported to have Labour only five or six points ahead of the Greens. Emerging from the election as effectively a medium-sized party is no way to celebrate Labour’s centenary. The prospect those List MPs could be looking in the Situations Vacant come October was focusing minds.

There were whispers about the nuclear option of forcing a leadership change, not necessarily to win the election but to try to shore up Labour’s vote from a catastrophic low. Ironically, Cunliffe’s opponents Jones and Robertson may well have stopped those musings turning into a more concrete push. Some had discussed putting Jones up as that last-minute leader because he could have an immediate impact on the polling.

He took himself out of the equation by resigning. Robertson helped forestall any such move by his dogged pursuit of Collins, ensuring it distracted from Labour’s woes, giving voters time to forget and for the polls to rally. David Parker also helped, delivering a monetary policy statement that actually had some relevance to everyday people, although he has so far fallen short on delivering the numbers needed for people to assess what it means to them.

I’m not sure it is a bad thing for National, if Labour doesn’t have a change of leader.

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61 Responses to “Did Collins and Jones save Cunliffe?”

  1. WineOh (575 comments) says:

    It is too late for another leadership change now.

    Phil Goff Nov 2008 – Dec 2011
    David Shearer Dec 2011 – Sep 2013
    David Cunliffe Sep 2013 – May 2014
    Robertson May 2014 – Nov 2014??

    The thought of having 4 different leaders in 4 years would be a disaster for the party, like it or not Cunliffe is here until the election.

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  2. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (825 comments) says:

    I think Claire’s column is way out of touch. Roy Morgan shows Labour and Greens will be in Government and no way Labour’s internal polling will be showing them in late 20s….Watch out for all the major polls which will come out of the budget release, which means only on the Sunday of 25th or most likely June 1st. National would be taking a huge hit. Every newspaper, every TV station is working against John Key and National. Legitimate fund raising events which are well published, declared are now being portrayed as some backroom discussions…

    There is no reaction from John Key or Government. Bitterly disappointed.

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  3. lilman (912 comments) says:

    Cunliffe is a person who has no traction ,as a leader,as an MP and most importantly within his Caucus.
    When it os time to take him out,no-one will stand with him as it will be certain death as a future leader in the party.

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  4. WineOh (575 comments) says:

    Actually worth fleshing out the past leaders of the Labour Party and their length of tenure:
    Harry Holland 14yrs
    Michael Savage 7 yrs
    Peter Fraser 10 yrs
    Walter Nash 13 yrs
    Arnold Nordmeyer 2 yrs
    Norman Kirk 9 yrs
    Bill Rowling 9 yrs
    David Lange 6 yrs
    Geoffrey Palmer 1 year (and almost one month :-P)
    Mike Moore 3 years
    Helen Clark 15 yrs
    Phil Goff 3 yrs
    David Shearer 1 year + 9 mths
    David Cunliffe – 8 months, so far

    So how would it feel to be the shortest duration Labour leader in the history of the party – even worse than the useless Geoffrey Palmer – ditched 2 months before the election in favour of Mike Moore (who lost in a landslide election to Bolger).

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  5. Judith (8,226 comments) says:

    I don’t think Collins did anyone any favours. An election that is won because someone else stuffed up, is not what this country needs. If a winner cannot be determined by the strengths of their vision and its application, to this country – then we all lose. So a labour win because of Collin’s performance is bad for us all.

    Whether Collins is successful in achieving the demise of National in this election, will entirely depend on how she conducts herself when she returns to parliament. Should the opposition have actually found solid proof of any dishonesty, and that is released at the same time, or just after the budget, then I think National will be in a very precarious position because the budget will be their key point – and if she overshadows it – they have little chance of undoing the damage.

    However, even if that happens, Labour is still not going to be able to form a government without it being a coalition (same for National). Winston, (especially demonstrating his strengths in this mornings debate), is likely to be the king maker, and the more we hear from him, the more it is obvious that his being able to work with National is highly unlikely. A Key/Winston relationship would never work – both are too ‘big’ to work with the other.

    And why should Winston even try? Should there be a change of leader for Labour (and I don’t think that will make a great deal of difference to their already low support levels) it is pretty obvious that Winston will be the strongest personality.

    Whether he has the title or not, everyone knows that whichever party NZ1 is in coalition with, it will be Winston who will have the most influence.

    This week – the future of New Zealand rests with the actions of two people – Winston Peters and Judith Collins. And that is a frightening thought!

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  6. Manolo (13,514 comments) says:

    It would be a huge mistake to write the socialists off, who in unholy alliance with e communist Greens could well gain political power and become government.

    I share SCS’s disappointment regarding Labour Lite’s lack of spine. They need to go for the kill and expose each one of the lies spread by the opposition. Knowing the MSM is rooting for the reds, what are Key & co. waiting for?

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  7. Alan (1,073 comments) says:

    If he was in any danger, of which I’m far from convinced, it’s passed.

    Labour has a natural constituency in this country, it just needs to avoid doing stupid things which it’s done over the past two weeks, in order for these people to come home to it. A bit of discipline from Labour will see them into the mid 30s.

    In terms of the election, I see the what’s happening in Christchurch as the biggest danger to National; I’d love to see some regional sub samples on the next set of polls. There’s a real danger that the skillful Dalziel will help deliver a large vote there for Labour. Christchurch is pissed off and looking for someone to blame.

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  8. Adolf Fiinkensein (2,811 comments) says:

    It is highly amusing to see all the pompous pious lefties pontificating over the imagined demise of Judith Collins.

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  9. iMP (2,304 comments) says:

    Let’s just remember, that most of the polls are a sample of what 1000 kiwis think everyone else is thinking.

    After 20 Sept its simply: Greens/Lab/Maori/Mana/NZF vs Nats/ACT/UF/Conservatives.

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  10. kiwi in america (2,461 comments) says:

    Alan – whilst it’s true that people in Christchurch are disgruntled, I refer you to an analysis I did of Labour’s result in the Christchurch East by-election http://www.kiwiblog.co.nz/2013/12/guest_post_by-election_analysis.html. Bottom line – the result in Chch East was little different from the Mt Albert by-election despite Labour pouring in much bigger resources (massive free canvass done by 2013 Conference attendees), the intense focus of new leader Cunliffe’s team and excellent GOTV ground effort by Jim Anderton. Set against the backdrop of the earthquake and insurance issues, this was not too bad a result for National despite the media spin.

    By September more economic good news and incremental progress on the rebuild may see National creep up further from its Chch East result making Chch must less of an electoral drag.

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  11. peterwn (3,192 comments) says:

    Judith Collins was unlucky. The war room was looking for a target and she copped it. It could have easily been some other minister, and if there was insufficient to go on, the rest would have been manufactured, just like with Trevor’s made up claim about the $500,000.

    The left wing MSM journos are still baying for her demise – For John to yield to this would hand them a handsome victory.

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  12. hmmokrightitis (1,553 comments) says:

    Disagree peterwn, Crusher wasnt unlucky, she was stupid – her inability to think about a perceived conflict of interest was crass stupidity – JK must be furious.

    That on top of Williamsons stupidity would be bad enough, but the same timeframe?

    You dont kick the ball to the opposition in front of your goal.

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  13. Colville (2,149 comments) says:

    Re : Christchurch.
    I can see there will be a lot of tradies working a lot of OT getting a few very visible projects finished in time for Key and Co to be on telly opening them in the lead up to the election.
    Likely that the front of the building will be done and the gib not on the rest of it where the cameras dont get to go!

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  14. Colville (2,149 comments) says:

    Crusher and Williamson.
    Great to get them over and done so far out from the election, joe punter will have forgotten come the big day.
    130 days away approx? its a long time, plenty of water to go under bridge yet.

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  15. bc (1,344 comments) says:

    I agree hmmokrightitis. Labour were in freefall, until Maurice and Judith stuffed up – thanks for nothing you two!

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  16. hmmokrightitis (1,553 comments) says:

    bc, quite why a minister wouldn’t think before they do anything like that: “If this was on the front page of the herald, how would it look?” I have no idea. Cant be naivety, surely. Arrogance, stupidity, who knows. But as you say, thanks for nothing FFS, they almost kicked the ball into their own damned goal themselves. :(

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  17. thePeoplesFlag (212 comments) says:

    Nice try DPF, but no one is buying.

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  18. Bogusnews (450 comments) says:

    I’m a bit puzzled why Judith’s comment received several negatives. It sounded pretty good to me.

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  19. Psycho Milt (2,337 comments) says:

    Some had discussed putting Jones up as that last-minute leader because he could have an immediate impact on the polling.

    If that is true, and not just idle gossip being promoted by Labour’s opponents, the idiots who discussed it should get out of politics before they do even more damage. Jones was in the wrong party and would have been a disaster as leader – giving him the job in the hope of a short-term lift in the polls as a result would have been strategic stupidity of the worst sort.

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  20. Psycho Milt (2,337 comments) says:

    Speaking of stupid, there’s also this:

    …a monetary policy statement that actually had some relevance to everyday people, although he has so far fallen short on delivering the numbers needed for people to assess what it means to them.

    The point of a monetary policy isn’t whether or not it benefits you personally. The people waiting for numbers that will tell them if it benefits them or not are either idiots or utterly self-interested.

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  21. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (825 comments) says:

    Why this election is so important for National and New Zealand. A third term National Government means:

    1. End of Cunliffe and a very distinct possibility of a split Labour. A dud like Grant Robertson will never inspire Labour. They will be doomed for at least for another 3 years and National could look forward to a record 4th term in 2017 assuming the clowns in National don’t stuff up

    2. Greens will be in opposition for another 3 years. For power hungry Russel and Tuatara that will be too much of a wait. They will disappear from the political scene to plant mung beans

    3. END OF WINSTON PETERS – He will retire from politics for good and if John Key shows him some mercy, he will get a ambassador role somewhere and enjoy his retired life

    4. END OF DOTCON. He will be gone for good and that is the best that can happen for New Zealand

    5. Horny Hone will be consigned to dust bin. Irrelevant

    6. No crazy taxes, green growth crap (take it on the chin Mills boy), no more nonsense about green jobs

    7. Economic growth, more jobs, low crime and sensible middle of the road regime

    8. Rejuvenated National team ready to tackle “young” Labour – King, Mallard, Goff…..

    9. All the MSM who are predicting National’s demise now will end up with egg on their face and we can have a good laugh….

    10. Best of all resident commies Corin Dann and Paddy Labour Gower have to call John Key PM for another three years – priceless…..

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  22. mikenmild (11,193 comments) says:

    SCS
    1. I doubt an election defeat will mean the end of Cunliffe. No one else likely to challenge.
    2. Greens are committed activists. They won’t just go away.
    3. Sir Winston Peters will serve as co-Prime Minister in the National/NZ First coaltion government.
    4. You are right on this one.
    5. Hone will be back. They love him at home.
    6. Same old, same old.
    7. The legacy of the last Labour government will continue to be diligently maintained by English and Key.
    8. Teams will remain roughly comparable – three or four key players in each.
    9. Who is predicting National’s demise?
    10. Not commies, but John Key will keep half the premiership (job share with Winston).

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  23. dime (9,607 comments) says:

    I love that Robertson thinks he is electable.

    An obese, smug, gay guy who lives in the beltway and is ashamed of his husband. That should appeal to voters.

    I also heard him make fun of the fact that he’s a home wrecker. Class.

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  24. Sir Cullen's Sidekick (825 comments) says:

    Karma is a bitch fellows….read this!!

    Embattled internet entrepreneur Kim Dotcom has reduced his stake in his data storage and encryption business, Mega, with the largest shareholder now listed Shen Zhao Wu, a donor to the National Party. – Source: NBR

    Now will the honourable Horny Hone will back out because Dotcon’s business is now majority owned by a Chinese man who is also a donor to the National party?

    @mikenmild – Check out today’s NZ political column by John Armstrong who says – “Wheels falling off as National hits bumpy bits on road to election”

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  25. tvb (4,229 comments) says:

    National would rather go into opposition that share co-PM with Winston. How is that supposed to work anyway. Key would simply pack his bags and look for an international job of which there will be plenty of offers.

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  26. OneTrack (2,742 comments) says:

    mike – “Sir Winston Peters will serve as co-Prime Minister in the National/NZ First coaltion government.”

    I don’t think so. Key has better things to do than put up with Winston’s antics. Based on the obvious antagonism between the two, it just wont happen.

    Vote Winston, enable green. It is as simple as that.

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  27. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Onetrack
    Winston just puts it on for the cameras, the only thing he has any feeling for is the baubles of office.
    I think Key detestes him, if only Key hadnt had that cup of tea Winston would be where he belongs, in the wilderness or shining the shoes of his awful lawyer brother

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  28. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    The other thing i dont get from this article is that i didnt think that the labour mps could roll the leader i thought the party, unions etc had to do that.

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  29. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    I think its Cunliffe forrced fake smile that i hate the most out of my list of hates about him

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  30. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    Pure fiction.

    You neolibs must have missed the Roy Morgan poll this week.

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  31. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    A great piere by Bob Jones on Winston a few years ago
    Compares his demise to Graham Capill of all people
    http://www.stuff.co.nz/blogs/opinion/613879/i-The-rise-and-descent-of-Winston-Peters-i

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  32. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Samuel
    I havent missed the polls since Cunliffe took over. He hasnt really imprroved things has he, just seems more people a voting greens, labourrs not going up

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  33. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    martinh
    I havent missed the polls since Cunliffe took over. He hasnt really imprroved things has he, just seems more people a voting greens, labourrs not going up – You’re not the brightest guy on the block are you?

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  34. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    By the way, in this article of Claires who are rthe anonymous donors key keeps mentioning, he seems to act as though he knows who they are.
    How bad could it be Kim John Unn and Bashaar Al Assad or something?
    Not sure id give a shit if it was Kim dotcom, he gives to anything which isnt John Key

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  35. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    This article DPF has posted was on thursday.
    Why hasntrhe posted all the ones this weekend about Collins and how it has seemed to of affected National?

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  36. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    martinh

    I assume English is not your first language.

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  37. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Samuel
    Why do you assume that?
    I assume that you cant answer the question as to why Labour has not gone up with Cunliffe in charge.

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  38. Judith (8,226 comments) says:

    I think you are underestimating Winston and I sincerely hope National isn’t mirroring you.

    On this morning’s debate, Winston came through very strong. He is astute enough to know that the baby boomers are the biggest population group (in the voting population) and therefore is offering what many of them want.

    Baby boomers remember when New Zealand did not need so many immigrants, when the land was owned by kiwis, and owning your own house was possible with just a little bit of hard work. The cohort has started to retire, and so pampering their specific needs also will win him votes. They are also the ‘grandparents’ who having bought up their own families, are concerned about what sort of world they are leaving for their grandchildren. The want them to have what they had as children – the freedoms to express themselves without fear of foreign intervention.

    Baby boomers are also the same group that protested against apathied (separatism), nuclear weapons, and other such social ‘ills’. They remember with great passion the rainbow warrior bombing, a pointless war in Vietnam and so on. They are a generation that appreciates honesty and straight talk. As children they were told of the horrors of war from their fathers that fought, and so are still a little wary of too much foreign investment in ‘their’ country, whilst at the same time detest the oppression of any one group based on ‘colour’ or difference.

    Due to their background, many baby boomers are swinging voters, and as most people know – that is the vote that make the biggest difference in an election. In 2008 they swung against Helen, for two terms they’ve supported National, but they are restless, and all over the place.

    Winston is not stupid, he might never get my vote, but I really believe he has done his homework and knows whose confidence he had to gain and where he can make the swinging vote settle – and frankly, his recent talk has gone a long way towards getting that.

    Don’t underestimate the ol’ dog – that could be nationals biggest mistake.

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  39. Samuel Smith (276 comments) says:

    martinh

    Why do you think I assume that?

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  40. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Samuel
    Samuel Smith (271 comments) says:
    May 10th, 2014 at 4:40 pm
    martinh

    I assume English is not your first language.

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  41. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Samuel
    So come on, tell me, are you a xenophobe? Is your name meant to represent SS?

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  42. David Garrett (6,658 comments) says:

    Judith: That’s an unusually coherent contribution…

    martinh: He may be referring to the many typos in your contributions old boy…Our gracious host provides us all with four minutes to proof read and correct our efforts…Yes, some of us do indeed still try and get the usage of our mother tongue arright..Samuel is presumably one of them…

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  43. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    David
    Ok thanks for the tip, my keyboards stuffed at present so im using it and the on-screen keyboard so i might have more mistakes than i would normally allow myself.
    Thanks also for showing some consolidation and doing one after the word tongue yourself!

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  44. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    David,
    That might not be what Samuel means as i havent heard back from him.
    I dont think it can be as his post at 4:18 is:

    You neolibs must have missed the Roy Morgan poll this week.

    Im not sure he is a pedant as if he was he would now be looking so embarrassingly hypocritical. What a dag perhaps he is a hypocritical pedant hence the silence now from him…….

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  45. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Cunliffe gets the followers he deserves.

    Samuel
    During your england studies you should look up the Roy Morgan poll and see how its not the most reliable indicator.

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  46. slightlyrighty (2,499 comments) says:

    I see nothing in Cunliffe’s make up that says Prime Minister. The campaign will only make that even more clear. A head to head with Key and Cunliffe during the election will be telling.

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  47. David Garrett (6,658 comments) says:

    slightly: I have had the advantage of seeing Key and Cunliffe up lose and jousting…I think Key will best him in an election debate, but it would be close….but debating skill alone doesn’t make someone PM material…

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  48. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    problem is people a tiring of Key.
    Cunliffes unappealing but it may be a change just to get rid of Key

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  49. David Garrett (6,658 comments) says:

    martinh: “People are tiring of Key”…Really? On what evidence do you base that extraordinary conclusion? Poll data I have seen suggest he is more popular than ever…especially when compared to Cunliffe…

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  50. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    David
    Just my extraordinary perception.
    I agree Keys lucky Cunliffes his opposite

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  51. Judith (8,226 comments) says:

    @ martinh (893 comments) says:
    May 10th, 2014 at 6:03 pm

    New Zealander’s are not very good at electing governments for a third term. Whilst I don’t think they are tiring of him, they are perhaps less enamored like they were when he was a fresh face.

    Through no fault of his own – earthquakes, recessions, and world politics has prevented him from fulfilling the dreams that many had about his tenure.

    To make it worse, things like Pike River, Auckland housing, Novopay, and issues with Chch rebuild give the impression that the Govt is not managing well. (We won’t even mention errant MPs) Of course it wouldn’t matter who was in charge, the impact would be the same, but when you couple these things with the choice of a third term without change, Key is at a distinct disadvantage. He is going to have to pull something special out of the hat to win (without having a four or five party coalition).

    I don’t think the budget is going to be the big attraction that it is hoped to be. Anything too extravagant is going to get claims of a lolly scramble, and a small/tiny amount in the black, isn’t enough for people whose lifestyle isn’t reflecting an improvement, to be convinced enough to make it a big deciding issue.

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  52. martinh (1,163 comments) says:

    Judith
    I think housing has being why ive gone off him. Foreigners shouldnt be able to outbid those living here

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  53. Judith (8,226 comments) says:

    @ martinh (895 comments) says:
    May 10th, 2014 at 6:55 pm

    I understand why the govt doesn’t mind the housing situation because it fits within their financial plan, however, they are there to represent what the people want, and I don’t know anyone that doesn’t agree with you. They do not like the way that NZ land is being sold. Although some of those people are national supporters, they do not agree with that aspect. Key will have to offer those people some big positives on other policies, if he is to retain their loyalties against those who are promising to end the ‘foreign land grab’.

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  54. David Garrett (6,658 comments) says:

    Judith: On what do you base your claim that “NZers are not good at electing third term goverments”? KJ Holyoake ruled for four terms from 1957 to 72′…Muldoon for three from 1975 to ’84…The She Beast for three terms…I would have said three terms is more the norm than the exception…

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  55. prosper (137 comments) says:

    Judith. Only a small number of baby boomers marched against apartheid, most wanted to watch the rugby. A smaller number were against Vietnam the vast majority believed in the domino effect. Many were pleased with the sinking of the Rainbow Warrior but regretted the death. Barring U.S. warships from NZ because of neither confirm nor deny yet allowing Chinese warships to dock and believing they are nuclear free is beyond naive. I could go on. My point is the baby boomers were busy getting on with life and unfortunately let a very vocal minority dictate direction. Most baby boomers vote for the same party election after election.

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  56. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    Your post ignores the obvious facts, DPF.

    Labour polls at somewhere around 30-33% and the Greens poll at somewhere about 12-15%. That’s the “left” vote.

    National has been doing really well in the last few years and polls somewhere from 42-48%. There is no other right wing party with any real support, because National has devoured its coalition partners, and what’s worse is that this is about as well as National has ever done. The left have actually managed to get over 50% in MMP elections, the right never have (I used to have a spreadsheet detailing all the vote shares).

    National cannot win the election without coalition partners, and it looks like ACT and the Maori Party are going to take an absolute hiding this time. Dunne is good for one, and that’s it. If National gets below 43% on election day, it is going to be very hard for them to form a government.

    That leaves Winston. His natural constituency is conservative people who don’t like right wing economics – in other words, disgruntled National voters. I think Judith is right: he is going to come out of this election quite well. National could persuade him to support the government, but he will extract a heavy price and the past has shown that the National right will only pay that price for so long.

    National has been playing without a proper opponent for 5 years. Goff was never going to win and Shearer was ineffectual. National and its media allies have spent the last six months throwing the most ridiculous amounts of frankly pathetic shit at Cunliffe, and for that they have managed to keep Labour about where it was and have done nothing to stop the Greens being at historically high levels of support.

    You better hope that the media decides to go back to bashing Labour, because if they don’t, it is going to be a hard road. Labour actually look pretty organised now. Jones is gone, and Robertson seems to have found a job he likes and is good at. They’ve even found an outlet for Trevor’s talents.

    The elephant in the room is Christchurch. Like most people who live elsewhere, I haven’t been paying much attention, but with the floods and reading around, it seems that the rebuild has been botched. That’s on the government.

    I still think that National will be the next government, but the deals required to make that happen will be so dodgy as to turn off a majority of New Zealanders (like the last time they did a deal with Winston).

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  57. Tom Jackson (2,479 comments) says:

    I understand why the govt doesn’t mind the housing situation because it fits within their financial plan, however, they are there to represent what the people want, and I don’t know anyone that doesn’t agree with you. They do not like the way that NZ land is being sold. Although some of those people are national supporters, they do not agree with that aspect. Key will have to offer those people some big positives on other policies, if he is to retain their loyalties against those who are promising to end the ‘foreign land grab’.

    It’s not just that. Our biggest city seems at risk of becoming an enclave for Asian business interests. It’s one thing to have wealthy people moving and investing here. It’s quite another when they come from a culture that does not value democratic rights, honest government, and civil freedoms.

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  58. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    Don’t care what happens, so long as the homosexual, dysfunctional, and fiscally dyslexic leeching socialists don’t get control of Treasury. Imagine Ross 69 and Mikenwimp lining up for their new State houses, extra benefits, and pumping out more unwanted brats to qualify for all the taxpayer-funded bludging benefits. It would see tax on Lotto, CGT on family homes (Cunliffe would be in the role of MoF that day), unions telling us what to pay staff, hours of work, and conditions; petrol at $4 per litre to appease the evil Greens. We have two properties and a business to sell. Am well and truly ready to hack a track overseas until these goons have stuffed NZ credit, and are no better than the losers they harbour in Sth Auckland, Naenae, Porirua, etc. They are currently operating a campaign of sleeze and envy highlighting the envy of useless gutless supporters in polls. What is infuriating is the assistance they are getting by MSM, and in particular the likes of Campbell, TVNZ, Newstalkzb, and Radio NZ. It is a effen disgrace.

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  59. MrTips (148 comments) says:

    Tom Jackson, Judith and others are right. Winston first are shaping up to be a major factor in this election for one reason only: they stand FOR something. National and Labour are both presenting policies that lack thought and practical application.

    Winston is not just attracting “baby boomers”; people in their 40-50s and even some students are also starting to listen to him.

    Why? Because Labour can’t produce coherent policy and a united front whilst its radical homosexual faction is fighting for control with the unionists and washed up old guard. As long as this remains, Labour is doomed.

    National seems to be asleep. The details of the $3K for ChCh are moronic; eg. who would employ a beneficiary immediately for more than the 90 day trial period? Coupled with the National inspired complete cock-up that is the ChCh rebuild, people are rightly asking: if National can’t positively contribute to ChCh rebuilding, how the hell can they be expected to run NZ?

    And Winston stands waiting.

    The message is clear National: DO something and STAND for something coherent. Bill English is right – the election is National’s to lose and at the moment they are doing it very well.

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  60. igm (1,413 comments) says:

    Winston is spouting the rhetoric re logs, immigration, etc., that got him a bauble in the first MMP government. He never tried to deliver on bloody thing . . . he is a charlatan and bauble sucker.

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  61. Paulus (2,540 comments) says:

    David Garrett.

    People are tiring of John Key because the media say so continually, day after day in the hope that it will stick.
    They are succeeding.

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