Maori views on culture

May 8th, 2014 at 7:00 am by David Farrar

Some interesting data from on culture and language.

  • 46% of Maori say engagement in Maori culture is quite or very important to them
  • 49% say spirituality is quite or very important to them, ranging from 38% for under 25s to 62% for over 55s
  • 29% say religion important
  • 89% say tribal identity important
  • 58% have been to a marae in last year
  • 75% watched a Maori TV programme and 34% a Maori radio station
  • 15% have a moko
  • 11% can speak Te reo well and and only 2.6% say it is their main language at home
  • 34% say things are getting better for their whanau and only 12% worse
  • 83% say their whanau are well off and just 6% not well off
  • 95% say whanau includes parents, children, partner and siblings
  • 41% say also includes aunts, uncles, cousins, nephews, nieces, in-laws

Pleasing to see most whanau are so well off, and many improving. Also interesting how tribal identity most important, then spirituality and culture followed by religion.

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17 Responses to “Maori views on culture”

  1. griffith (1,111 comments) says:

    15% have a facial tatoo?

    Boob tats aint te moko

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  2. lilman (957 comments) says:

    Maori feel engaged with their culture,which is a good thing for New Zealand,but cant find the time to vote in local elections so need to demand seats on councils with voting rights.
    It seems very lazy if not arrogant.

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  3. Viking2 (11,467 comments) says:

    89% say tribal identity important

    The problem here is that so many have so many tribal genetics, and many don’t know for sure those genetics, that identifying with any tribe is a matter of preference on any given day.
    History and who made whom pregnant have a big influence on this.( not just Maori, many races are the same.)
    without DNA testing (which is strongly opposed in Maoridom), we will never know the truth of any claim to tribal affiliations.

    A few years ago a very wise Maori lady said to me,: being Maori means that you nearly always know who your mother is, but, often not your father.:

    Now this is not only true for Maori as other races also have this issue.

    I can site you a very prominent Maori leader ( but I am not going to), whose genetics are clearly European but whose life has been intertwined into Maoridom.
    You only need to look at some of them to see this.

    Not saying they shouldn’t identify with the tribe the feel they belong to, just saying without DNA evidence its a matter of heresay for many.

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  4. Kea (12,770 comments) says:

    There we have it folks ! Maori are better off under National.

    Compare:

    Labour came in promising to improve the circumstances of Maori and close the gaps. Even though the Clark government came in during an economic boom time across the Western world, the gap expanded to the biggest in NZ history. Maori were put so off side they broke away and formed NZ’s first race based party. Clark would not even attend important Maori ceremonies out of fear of Maori.

    What this shows is National is doing a great (and improving) job of picking up the pieces. Thanks John and see you next term ;)

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  5. Dave Mann (1,218 comments) says:

    “Maori feel engaged with their culture,which is a good thing for New Zealand”

    Why is this a ‘good thing for New Zealand?

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  6. kowtow (8,428 comments) says:

    Talk is cheap.

    Proven by the stats.

    When it comes to the crunch ,where a real effort to be part of ones own culture ie language ,only 2% are actually involved.

    And don’t tell me saying “Kia ora” or “tamariki” twice a day counts .

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  7. Odakyu-sen (637 comments) says:

    I wonder if we are confusing here “Maori culture” with “Maori imagery” or (dare I say it) a “Maori brand”?

    It’s important to clearly define what you mean by the term “culture,” because it can mean all things to all people.

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  8. Scott Chris (6,133 comments) says:

    15% have a facial tatoo?

    No.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C4%81_moko

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  9. Paulus (2,626 comments) says:

    Not too may years ago some serious Maori DNA testing was done and the findings well published.
    The conclusion is that the DNA was very similar to tribes still found in the South East of Taiwan. Remember at the time of the conclusion of the release of the report that Winston Peters declared himself to be of Chinese descent.
    This is quite logical if you look at the considered routes through the Pacific, via say the Cook Islands, where the local language is known as Cook Island Maori.

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  10. Huevon (222 comments) says:

    Wish I was a Maori…if I “engage with” my culture (Western civilisation), my tribe (Irish), my religion (Catholic Christianity) and my family (marriage between one man and one woman) I get labelled a bigot, homophobe, misogynist, and racist.

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  11. Simon (719 comments) says:

    If the Stats department closed down overnight no one in the real world would miss them.

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  12. dime (9,970 comments) says:

    “75% watched a Maori TV programme and 34% a Maori radio station”

    once? twice? everyday?

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  13. griffith (1,111 comments) says:

    Culture in this context would mean.
    the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society.

    We could discuss the finer details of the quantifiable social behaviour in reference to the readily available social statistics of Maori New Zealand.

    As the colonial race we have no right to hold them up to our culture of social behaviour or our cultures derived morels.

    The politically correct way to deal with maori is to treat them as is their cultural heritage.

    Fire up the hangi….. long pork……. dindins….. just FFS clean them well first………..

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  14. Viking2 (11,467 comments) says:

    Dave Mann (1,135 comments) says:
    May 8th, 2014 at 8:10 am

    “Maori feel engaged with their culture,which is a good thing for New Zealand”

    Why is this a ‘good thing for New Zealand?

    Seriously good question. See what happens when you do.
    Findlayson’s “take no prisoners approach allows Maori to “own” us all.

    http://www.rotoruareview.co.nz/#folio=6

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  15. Tauhei Notts (1,710 comments) says:

    I’m not Maori, but am thinking of becoming one.
    My eldest brother became a Maori and a member of the Ngati Wikitoria tribe. He aligned himself with Ngai Tahu, as they seemed to have the most dough. Also, our parents were both born not far from Tuahiwi. I suggested to my eldest brother that he change his name to Tawhi as our great grand parents were from Wales.

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  16. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    @ Viking2 (10,833 comments) says:
    May 8th, 2014 at 7:25 am

    Judging from the numbers of people that join places like Ancestry.com and other such genealogical search sites, it is not just Maori that find ‘tribe’ identity important.

    Genealogical exploration has become a big industry as people search to track their roots back as far as possible, to find out their ‘tribal’ origins. They are not just happy with a nationality, but they want to know the ‘clan’ or base ethnicity of their ancestors, and frequently then apply the results to their current identity.

    The fact that Maori, as a race remained isolated from the infiltration of other cultures until historically relatively recently, is bound to make that desire more distinct – and much easier to establish.

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  17. EverlastingFire (286 comments) says:

    I feel like these stats have been doubled from what they really are.

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