Pasifika doing better in NZ

May 26th, 2014 at 1:00 pm by David Farrar

The Salvation Army has published a report on the state of people in New Zealand. Some of the positive changes:

  • ECE enrolment rates up from 24% in 2008 to 28.8% today
  • Suspension rate down from 7.1% in 2008 to 4.4% today – now lower than the NZ average
  • NCEA Level 1 achievement rates up from 48% in 2008 to 63% today
  • NCEA Level 2 achievement rates up from 54% in 2008 to 69% today
  • NCEA Level 3 achievement rates up from 32% in 2008 to 43% today
  • Drinks with hazardous drinking behaviours down from 23.4% to 17.8%
  • Pasifika on benefits down from 24,914 in 2013 to 23,239 in 2014
  • Median income in real terms up from $744 in 2008 to $767 today
  • Pasifika offending rate down 27% over last five years
  • Pasifika youth offending rate below NZ youth offending rate

Not all the stats are positive, such as home ownership rates. But considering most of the stats cover the period of the global financial crisis, I’d say that the changes overall are quite commendable. The educational improvements are, to me, the most important as they will have flow on effects with jobs, incomes and crime.

 

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25 Responses to “Pasifika doing better in NZ”

  1. Judith (8,534 comments) says:

    Let’s hope this report receives a better reception than the last one did. There were many in the Pacific Island community that were not the least bit happy with the last report, many calling the report unrepresentative, and not reflective of the actual situation.

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  2. louie (96 comments) says:

    > I’d say that the changes overall are quite commendable.
    Not the spin that Radio NZ National managed to put on the report early this morning (6:30ish). All they could talk about from the report was about Pacific people sleeping in cars.

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  3. dave53 (91 comments) says:

    You should have heard Moaning Retort this morning. Their utterly negative spin on it could have been from a different report to the one you are quoting!

    http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/245377/pasifika-people-missing-out-report

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  4. Adolf Fiinkensein (2,903 comments) says:

    Yes they’re missing out, alright. Missing out on Labour.

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  5. trout (939 comments) says:

    Before the complaints roll in about how Pacifica people do not get a fair share of the cake let there be a full declaration of payments to the church and funds repatriated to the islands, not to mention the large sums spent on funerals and celebrations. These self imposed costs are of course legitimate but financial capability to purchase houses will of course be handicapped. The churches, and their clergy, seem to have plenty of money to spend on new buildings and houses.

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  6. Harriet (4,969 comments) says:

    The Islanders over the last few years have decided to get some pride and get off the Labour plantation. However due to the likes of the lack of jobs and the nessecity of the dole they are to a degree still loyal to Labour.

    We will see this at the election as they will give their electorate vote to Labour – and the party vote to the Christian Conservatives as they are loyal to God also. It’s their culture.

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  7. Odakyu-sen (646 comments) says:

    I dislike the word “Pasifika”. It doesn’t sound like an English word, with its “-ka” suffix and lack of an “n” when used as an adjective, as in “Pasifika People”. (Why not “Pacifican People,” if you must.)

    I have tried the online Websters and the Oxford dictionaries, but I can’t find any reference to “Pasifika.” (Googling shows that most websites that use “Pasifika” are NZ-domained ones.

    What were the reasons given for abandoning the term “Pacific Islander”?
    (I don’t like this term for the same reason that I dislike the term “Asian”–another blanket term for groups of distinctive ethnicities that too many European Pakeha* (among others) are too lazy to bother to learn to differentiate.)

    *Note: Many European Pakeha (of British ancestry) that I know resent being associated with “Europeans” with whom their ancestors fought several lengthy wars over the last couple of centuries.

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  8. goldnkiwi (1,304 comments) says:

    Perhaps Pacific Islander was shortened to Pacificer and then the spelling became stylised to Pasifika?

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  9. Tautaioleua (305 comments) says:

    Odakyu-sen, that’s because it doesn’t have English origins. You’ll find that other Europeans discovered the Pacific region long before the English.

    Pasifika/Pasefika is inspired by the Latin phrase Mare Pacificum, or peaceful sea, a name given by navigator Ferdinand Magellan to the Pacific ocean.

    Who’s he, you might ask?

    He led the first expedition from Europe to Asia by the west, rounding the Americas by south, and crossing the Pacific Ocean for the first time, which resulted in the first circumnavigation of the earth.

    The English were still in caves at the time.

    :-)

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  10. Rosa19 (25 comments) says:

    the NCEA Level 2 qualifications can contain little or no maths, reading, writing, science or computing skills… if you look at the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) data for New Zealand, the percentage of Pasifika achieving level 2 or above declined for mathematics between 2009 (60 per cent) and 2012 (54 per cent) and stayed relatively stable for science (62 per cent) and reading (66 per cent)… the increase in Pasifika students achieving NCEA Level 2 is positive but the PISA results suggest that this is not reflected by an increase in the above base skills? See New Zealand Initiative, Do qualifications equate to ability?, February, 2014.

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  11. scrubone (3,099 comments) says:

    The English were still in caves at the time.

    Cambridge university had been founded 300 years previously.

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  12. Odakyu-sen (646 comments) says:

    “… that’s because it doesn’t have English origins.”

    I understand that many words in English usage don’t have English origins. What I don’t understand is the refusal to add an “-n” and to use the word in its adjectival form that ends with a “-ka”. I don’t know of any other words in the English language whose adjectival forms end in “-ka.”

    “Africa” becomes “African” when used as an adjective. I would expect “Pasifika” to become “Pasifikan” at least, to reflect a standard English usage.

    It just doesn’t flow…

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  13. I Say Look Here (57 comments) says:

    Wonderful to see our taxpayer dollars being spent so wisely on Radio New Zealand.

    Clearly their report has been deliberately skewed to accentuate the negative. If they were at all interested in balance, it would have said something along the lines of “Pasifika people have made progress in key areas since 2008, according to the Salvation Army’s latest report, but much work remains to be done….”

    You’ve failed us yet again, RNZ.

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  14. Tautaioleua (305 comments) says:

    If it’s a Latin phrase, wouldn’t we use the Latin form for adjectives? why would you bastardise it by using English, instead?

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  15. rangitoto (247 comments) says:

    “Cambridge university had been founded 300 years previously”

    Oxford uni is older still. Cambridge was founded by refugees from Oxford town vs gown violence of 1209.

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  16. Odakyu-sen (646 comments) says:

    “why would you bastardise it by using English, instead?”

    Because English is a bastard language. (And a nasty one at that, it seems…)

    To quote James Nicoll “We don’t just borrow words; on occasion, English has pursued other languages down alleyways to beat them unconscious and riffled their pockets for new vocabulary.”

    Japanese does exactly the same thing to English. Deal with it.

    Anyway, I am getting way off topic.

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  17. Bob R (1,371 comments) says:

    ***Not all the stats are positive, such as home ownership rates. ***

    Majority are based in Auckland where house prices have been driven up. It’s hard to see them competing with Asians for houses.

    “The Asian population is now New Zealand’s third largest at 471,711, according to the census. It has grown from 6.6 per cent in 2001 to 11.8 per cent in 2013.

    Spoonley predicts that within the next two decades the Asian population will be larger than the Maori population.

    “The fastest growing group in New Zealand are the Asian community. Already in Auckland they almost outnumber Maori and Pasifika,” he said.”

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  18. G152 (337 comments) says:

    If the Island people in New Zealand stopped giving most of their money to their churches the ‘poverty’ would be instantly solved

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  19. Bob R (1,371 comments) says:

    Do you have any stats on that? What about Europeans who give money to their churches?

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  20. Don the Kiwi (1,750 comments) says:

    Odakyu-sen

    “I dislike the word “Pasifika”. It doesn’t sound like an English word, with its “-ka” suffix and lack of an “n” when used as an adjective, as in “Pasifika People”. (Why not “Pacifican People,” if you must.)”

    I stand to be corrected, but I think that “Pasifika” is the term Pacific Islanders – particularly Tongan and Samoan people – prefer to be called. I believe it was them who first used the word, to be more compatible with their own language.

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  21. Bad__Cat (140 comments) says:

    Pasifika is a socialist term, from the same people who spouted on about Amerika a decade or two ago.

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  22. Odakyu-sen (646 comments) says:

    That’s an interesting point, Don, but it really isn’t up to the Pacific Islanders to dictate what New Zealanders should call them. If such a practise was common, all the Japanese in Auckland would expect to be called “Nihonjin.”

    I detect a fawning to outsiders and a willingness to abandon ones’ rights to determination of one’s own language. If you won’t stand up for your language, you probably won’t stand up for any other part of your culture. (Having said that, I realize that any living language will change over time.)

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  23. kowtow (8,449 comments) says:

    Nomenclature.

    Why do we insist on dividing our population into various and different ethnic etc groups?

    Aren’t we all New Zealanders and equal?

    Just more cultural marxism.

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  24. MikeG (425 comments) says:

    I presume that ‘today’ means 2013 as NCEA achievement is measure each school year. It also means that those NCEA students went through primary school BEFORE National Standards were introduced – in other words they got a good start in their education life, despite what Anne Tolley tried to tell us.

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  25. Odakyu-sen (646 comments) says:

    kowtow,

    don’t you mean “nomenklatura”?

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