Annual net migration with Australia falls again

June 23rd, 2014 at 3:00 pm by David Farrar

migrationmay14

Stats NZ has released the latest monthly data and as one can see the net loss to Australia is still shrinking. Labour seem to think this is a bad thing, incidentially! Arrivals from Australia are at a record high, and departures are close to a 10 year low. Will the two lines cross in the next year?

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9 Responses to “Annual net migration with Australia falls again”

  1. redqueen (582 comments) says:

    From Labour’s perspective, this is terrible news. It means people actually want to live here and all the New Zealand bashing isn’t working…so far, the Conservatives do it, NZ First do it, the Greens do it, and Labour do it. National and Act seem to be the only parties calling the shots as they are: life is pretty good and we’re doing better than we have been in a long time. We still have plenty to do and things to fix, but this isn’t a terrible shite hole, contrary to what the Lefties seem to say. Simply put: I’ve had a guts full of all of this New Zealand bashing by whingers.

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  2. Harriet (5,103 comments) says:

    Aussies moving to, or kiwis returning to NZ, are generaly richer than probably most others who come to NZ.

    Labour sees no votes in that. A crisis for them.

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  3. Odakyu-sen (732 comments) says:

    Healthy, self-motivated, can-do New Zealanders who can compare and critique NZ society.

    Nahh. What use would such people be to Labour?

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  4. mjw (399 comments) says:

    Yep, as soon as people knew Tony Abbott was going to be PM, they started fleeing Australia.

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  5. hj (7,059 comments) says:

    Stats NZ has released the latest monthly migration data and as one can see the net loss to Australia is still shrinking. Labour seem to think this is a bad thing, incidentially!
    ….
    I think they are following the Reserve Bank suggestion:

    The Reserve Bank in its submission to the inquiry says that, while many factors influence the demand for housing, in New Zealand migration and demography appear to be particularly important, not just in the latest cycle but in those of the 1970s and 1990s.
    The first and best approach to improving housing affordability would address supply-side factors like availability of affordable sections and whatever it is about the construction industry which is responsible for its record of low productivity and high inflation.

    “[But] in a second best world, where supply is not particularly responsive, policy might also look at whether there is scope to manage inflows of non-New Zealanders in a way that limits the contribution to cyclical demand pressures.” the bank says.
    It acknowledges that a policy of varying the inflow of immigrants in a counter-cyclical way would be challenging because of the lags involved.
    And the advantages in terms of stabilising the cycle would have to be weighed against the potential disruption to longer-term goals of migration policy – the confusing signal it could send.
    Precisely because of those lags, now is the right time to have this debate.

    http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10747202

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  6. hj (7,059 comments) says:

    Michael Reddell NZ Reserve Bank makes the point:

    Outflows of New
    Zealanders should generally act as a stabilizing force, helping to rebalance the
    economy. Economies with slow growing populations need to devote a whole lot
    smaller proportion of their real resources to simply maintaining the capital stock per
    worker.
    Based solely on the fertility and migration choices of New Zealanders (each
    presumably behaving fairly rationally), our population growth would have been
    growing only quite slowly since the mid 1970s. As it is, our population growth since
    1990 has been second or third fastest in the OECD. What changed? Migration
    policy did in the early 1990s.
    And 80% of our population growth in the last couple of decades has been the net
    inflow of non NZ citizens – thus almost purely a matter of discretionary policy
    choice. Government policy interventions can act to stymie successful adjustment –
    and I believe this to have been the case in NZ over the last two decades. Our negative
    NIIP position is larger, our real exchange rate is higher, our real interest rates are
    higher, and our capital stock per worker (and associated perceived business
    opportunities) are lower than they would have been if we had simply let the selfstabilising
    behavior take its course. As John McDermott’s slides showed earlier, that
    adjustment was working prior to the mid 1980s.

    http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/reviews-consultation/savingsworkinggroup/pdfs/swg-report-jan11.pdf

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  7. thor42 (971 comments) says:

    This is great to see!

    Whether they are Australians or New Zealanders returning home, both are welcome!
    We have an Aussie guy at work and he’s the best bloke you’d ever meet.

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  8. hj (7,059 comments) says:

    Red Queen says:
    “National and Act seem to be the only parties calling the shots as they are: life is pretty good and we’re doing better than we have been in a long time”
    ………
    who is “we” ? We are a low wage economy with high house prices becoming increasingly concentrated in fewer hands.

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  9. redqueen (582 comments) says:

    @hj

    ‘We’ is the people who are actually working and trying to do things like raise families, get ahead, and have a nice life. I agree, housing is stupidly overpriced and we could certainly use a boost in productivity (money’s worth, rather than simply paper itself). However, that will be addressed through improved economic fundamentals, more land being available for freedom of choice (aka, you can actually build something), and people actually being left free to improve themselves, rather than ever more ‘planning’ by the mob of ‘experts’ on the left. At that point, house prices might actually flatten out and we might actually get a boost in incomes.

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